User: Iram Topic: Muslim Women
Category: Veiling Practices
Last updated: Apr 17 2015 12:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Respect women's right to wear veil in court, says Britain's most senior judge 17.4.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Lord Neuberger says fairness requires understanding of different cultures and warns against judges’ privileged perspective being allowed to sway decisions

Judges must show respect to women who choose to keep their faces covered due to their religious beliefs, the UK’s most senior judge has said.

Lord Neuberger said judges must have “an understanding of different cultural and social habits” in their bid to show fairness to those involved in trials.

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Australian Fashion Week: the beautiful, the bizarre and all the free mineral water you can drink 16.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Despite her five-year-old Witchery top, Brigid Delaney feels at home as she mixes with the fashionistas, Instagrammers and wannabes in Sydney

I have finally made it to the front row of a catwalk show! Just like Anna Wintour, but not.

It only took four hours and is miraculous considering I’m wearing my five-year-old Witchery top that has a tear in the armpit. But here I am on my phone, checking my likes on Instagram, looking serious, just like all the other people in the front row with their free gigantic bottles of mineral water.

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Deutsche Börse 2015 review – shadowy burqas v epic towerblocks 15.4.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Mikhael Subotzky spent six years photographing every door and window of a 54-storey tower in Johannesburg, while Viviane Sassen proves herself a sculptor of light. Set beside heartbreaking portraits of LGBTI South Africans and Russians letting loose on the beach, this year’s shortlist is full of intrigue As always, this year’s Deutsche Börse photography prize exhibition gives both a glimpse of the future and a nod to the past. One floor comprises two artists, Zanele Muholi and Nikolay Bakharev , who shoot in black and white for what might be called traditional purposes – socially engaged portraiture and low-key observation. Another floor features the work of Viviane Sassen and Mikhael Subotzky , who have nothing in common but a desire to push the boundaries of the medium. Moving between floors is like walking from one world into ...
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Shiv Sena wants mandatory family planning for Muslims, Christians 15.4.2015 CNN-IBN: India
After stoking controversy with its demand that Muslims be stripped of their voting rights, Shiv Sena today advocated compulsory family planning for Muslims and Christians to check their "rising" population.
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Iran to appoint first female ambassador since the Islamic revolution 14.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Marzieh Afkham to become the second female ambassador Iran has ever had as Rouhani says it is government’s duty to create equal opportunities for women

Iran is set to appoint its first female ambassador since the 1979 Islamic revolution, marking a breakthrough for women in government under the moderate president, Hassan Rouhani.

Marzieh Afkham, who is the country’s first foreign ministry spokeswoman, is to head a mission in east Asia, the state news agency reported. It was not clear to which country she will be posted as her appointment is yet to be announced officially.

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‘Art gets things out in the open’ – young British Muslim artists tell their stories 12.4.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
What does the work of young Muslim artists tell us about cultural tensions in the UK over the past 15 years? As a new generation of poets, playwrights and painters emerges, we meet four who are changing the narrative… The stories that follow are based on interviews with four successful young British artists – working as actors, poets, playwrights, painters – who grew up in Muslim communities. Three of the artists I spoke to were born in this country; the fourth, Yusra Warsama, arrived as a baby. All in their 30s, they are old enough to remember the relatively relaxed multiculturalism of the 1990s and to have come of age during the increasing tensions, driven by the news agenda of the past 15 years. The question I was interested to put to them was this: to what degree do they feel a responsibility to use their artistic voices to counter the stridently negative stereotypes that young British Muslims ...
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Jesus Christ the family man? Why the church won’t buy it 8.4.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
New scientific evidence on the tomb of Jesus – and his wife and child – will never be accepted. Religion prefers its relics, like its art, with smoke and mirrors If only the great arguments between religion and doubt could be settled by scientific evidence. A story this week has it that solid evidence has emerged about the historical Jesus: the “ tomb of Jesus ” reportedly contains proof that Jesus was married, had a son – and was never resurrected. So that’s settled then. Or at least it would be if the scholarly world unanimously accepted these claims (which seems unlikely) or if religious belief were grounded in evidence. If that were the case, all religious belief would have disappeared when Charles Lyell uncovered the nature of geological processes and intimated the true age of Earth in the 1830s – the first clear evidence of a godless natural ...
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Lynsey Addario: ‘War journalists are not all addicted to adrenaline. It’s a calling’ 5.4.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
The photojournalist’s work in conflict zones has seen her subjected to the horrors of the frontline, including being kidnapped in 2011. In a new memoir, already optioned by Hollywood, the mother-of-one explains why she keeps on going back Lynsey Addario, 41, is a photojournalist who works mostly in conflict zones. She grew up in Connecticut, the daughter of Italian-American hairdressers, and was given her first camera, a Nikon FG, by her father when she was 13. She joined the Associated Press in 1996, and later began working for the New York Times, initially as a stringer. She has reported from Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Darfur, Iraq, Syria and Libya, where she was kidnapped in 2011 . In 2009 she was part of the team that won the Pulitzer prize for the New York Times for its “Talibanistan” series , and the same year she won a $500,000 MacArthur “genius” Fellowship. It has been reported that her new memoir, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War , is to be made into ...
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Iran’s deputy minister for sports: yes, women can go to watch big matches 5.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
Court dismisses charge against British-Iranian volleyball fan who spent five months in Tehran jail Continue reading...
All eyes on Ayyan Ali as Pakistan's top model swaps catwalk for court ordeal 3.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Caught at Islamabad airport with over half a million dollars in cash, one of the country’s most famous faces is languishing in jail on money-laundering charges

In past years, Ayyan Ali was deployed as one of the catwalk “showstoppers” at Fashion Pakistan Week, an annual three-day extravaganza that returned this week to a five-star hotel in Karachi.

But the last time the country’s most famous model was seen in public she was wearing an uncharacteristic black burqa as she shuffled into a court far from the gathering of her fellow fashionistas.

Some people are unkind because they are jealous – everyone bitches about the beautiful people

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Chinas jailing of man who grew beard absurd 30.3.2015 Hindustan Times: World
A sixyear prison sentence reportedly given to a man in Chinas mainly Muslim Xinjiang region for growing a beard was absurd an overseas group said Monday as accounts of the penalty disappeared ...
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Must women play football in sarees? 30.3.2015 India Together

Women in India have continually faced restrictions on how they dress, whether it is on wearing jeans to college or sports gear on the fields. Shoma Chatterji looks at this persistent trend of sartorial repression and urges women to reject such diktats.

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Adoor presented Dr Hazarika Award 30.3.2015 The Assam Tribune
Adoor presented Dr Hazarika Award
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Sudan: an unlikely path to jihad for nine British medical students 30.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

A group of young medics recently travelled to Syria to work in Islamic State-controlled hospitals. Khalid Abdelaziz visited Khartoum to investigate their path to radicalisation

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How resilient Mumbai is battling multiple drug resistant TB 28.3.2015 Hindustan Times: Lifestyle
Bustling Mumbai is undoubtedly Indias most vibrant metropolis but with 60 of its 13 million population living in slums inevitable shortfalls in housing sanitation and nutrition make people susceptible to ...
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Kyrgyzstan's cocktail of conservatism and apathy a bitter draught for women 26.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

At her bar in the Kyrgyzstani capital Bishkek, Guliaim Aiylchy places women in jobs that are traditionally the sole preserve of men. But in a country that merely pays lip service to women’s rights, her enlightened approach appears uncommon

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Voices behind and beyond the veil 23.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
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As a Muslim woman, I see the veil as a rejection of progressive values | Yasmin Alibhai-Brown 21.3.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
When even young girls are being dressed in hijabs, we need to ask what the female cover-up symbolises It could be a millenarian crisis or a delayed reaction to decades of bad history, but millions of Muslims seem to have turned inwards, hankering for an imagined golden age. They are contemptuous of modernity’s bendable, ductile values. Some are drawn to reactionary dogma, and preachers while a good number have thrown themselves into political Islam to resist and combat western hegemonies – or so the story goes. As a practising (though flawed) Shia Muslim, I watch the new puritans with apprehension. So too other Muslims worldwide, the silent many, watch and tremble. From the eighth to the early 20th century, Muslims strove for a broad education (as commanded in the Qur’an), questioned doctrines, and were passionate about scientific advancements, political and social ideals and art. Not even humiliating colonial rule deterred them from the march forward. Now the marchers are walking backwards. The hijab, ...
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‘Muslims in Pakistan are still seeking their identity’ 18.3.2015 TOI: Cities
‘Muslims in Pakistan are still seeking their identity’
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Canada MP retracts comments against wearing niqab at citizenship ceremony 17.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Conservative legislator Larry Miller said Muslim woman should ‘stay the hell where you came from’ if she does not want to remove face-covering

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