User: Iram Topic: Muslim Women
Category: Veiling Practices
Last updated: Mar 26 2015 14:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Kyrgyzstan's cocktail of conservatism and apathy a bitter draught for women 26.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

At her bar in the Kyrgyzstani capital Bishkek, Guliaim Aiylchy places women in jobs that are traditionally the sole preserve of men. But in a country that merely pays lip service to women’s rights, her enlightened approach appears uncommon

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Voices behind and beyond the veil 23.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
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As a Muslim woman, I see the veil as a rejection of progressive values | Yasmin Alibhai-Brown 21.3.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
When even young girls are being dressed in hijabs, we need to ask what the female cover-up symbolises It could be a millenarian crisis or a delayed reaction to decades of bad history, but millions of Muslims seem to have turned inwards, hankering for an imagined golden age. They are contemptuous of modernity’s bendable, ductile values. Some are drawn to reactionary dogma, and preachers while a good number have thrown themselves into political Islam to resist and combat western hegemonies – or so the story goes. As a practising (though flawed) Shia Muslim, I watch the new puritans with apprehension. So too other Muslims worldwide, the silent many, watch and tremble. From the eighth to the early 20th century, Muslims strove for a broad education (as commanded in the Qur’an), questioned doctrines, and were passionate about scientific advancements, political and social ideals and art. Not even humiliating colonial rule deterred them from the march forward. Now the marchers are walking backwards. The hijab, ...
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‘Muslims in Pakistan are still seeking their identity’ 18.3.2015 TOI: Cities
‘Muslims in Pakistan are still seeking their identity’
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Canada MP retracts comments against wearing niqab at citizenship ceremony 17.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Conservative legislator Larry Miller said Muslim woman should ‘stay the hell where you came from’ if she does not want to remove face-covering

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Fashion blogger Dina Torkia: ‘There’s a fear factor around the hijab’ 17.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Hijabi blogger ‘Dina Tokio’ started blogging while working in a call centre. Now she’s collaborating with Liberty and reporting for the BBC on a beauty pageant for Muslim women. How long before she’s up there with Zoella? In a lot of ways, Dina Torkia is a typical fashion blogger. The 25-year-old’s Days of Dolls site is full of pictures of her trying out new trends against an urban backdrop and has the usual smattering of self-promotion (for her recently launched clothing range). Torkia – who blogs under the name Tokio – also has the requisite social media stats: more than 33,000 followers on Instagram and videos on Youtube that average around 30,000 views. Torkia fundamentally differs from the likes of, say, Stylebubble’s Susie Lau . She is part of a wave of “ hijabi bloggers” – Muslim women giving voice to their love of fashion while wearing their hijabs. In all pictures on her site, Torkia is wearing a headscarf, and her clothes – however fabulous they may be – conform to Muslim standards of modesty. ...
Rocking the casbah: the gig of a lifetime that put Iranian women back on stage 16.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Since the 1979 revolution, women in Iran have been banned from singing solo. So what happened when this woman decided to stage an all-female concert? As No Land’s Songs, a film about the thrilling gig, shows in Britain, Sara Najafi tells Alexis Petridis how she outwitted scholars, officials and militia Three years ago, the Iranian singer and composer Sara Najafi came up with the idea of hosting a concert in Tehran, her hometown. It was a plan so audacious, it seemed slightly nuts. The concert would be “a festival of the female voice” featuring solo singers – not just Iranians, but artists from France and Tunisia, too. Nothing like it had been attempted in Iran for 35 years: after the Islamic Revolution of 1979, women were banned from singing solo in public. What’s more, Sara was inspired by the Green Movement, which grew out of the mass protests at Iran’s 2009 presidential election result. “It brought me to a new idea of music,” she says. “Basically, I wanted to make music for that movement.” Some ...
The real way to kick out prejudice 15.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Standing next to someone from a minority won’t prove to anyone that you are not prejudiced. Diversity goes deeper than cheap publicity stunts The sight that greeted people as they approached Wembley from the station, the looks on their faces. After a mob of Chelsea fans was filmed singing “We’re racist and we like it” and preventing a black man getting into their carriage on the Paris Metro, most Chelsea supporters have been keeping their heads down, quietly apologising. And then they came out of Wembley Park station to this. So a betting company had hired a Sikh man, a woman in a niqab, a black man and a white woman in a wheelchair to pose in front of a green banner, inviting Chelsea fans to be photographed with them to “prove you’re not prejudiced”. They tweeted photos of the stunt – pissed boys, faces like wadded toilet paper, clinking cans above the white woman’s head, one guy laughing so wide you can see the staining on his guts – but off to the sides of the banner you see the other fans walking ...
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I'm queer no matter who I'm with. I won't define myself differently for your comfort | Ashley C Ford 14.3.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
Identifying as queer or bisexual often means being mistrusted, misunderstood and even mislabeled for the rest of your life A family member asked me last week why I continue to identify as queer, even though I’m a woman who is in a long-term relationship with a man: “Give me one good reason why you have to call yourself ‘queer.’” She added that I could save myself a lot of trouble if I wore my opposite-sex relationship more openly, like some kind of hetero-veil to block bigots. I explained that I’d signed a contract with some very shady people, and that it said that I would have to publicly identify this way for a certain number of years and, if I said who, they’d have me killed. That’s not how being queer actually works; I wish the explanation was as easy to grasp as a ...
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Canada PM Stephen Harper's anti-Islam talk is Putin-like tactic - opposition 14.3.2015 DNA: India
A Canadian opposition leader on Friday compared Prime Minister Stephen Harper's handling of Islam to Russian President Vladimir Putin's crackdown on gays, ratcheting up political rhetoric over the religion as Harper's ruling Conservatives seek re-election in October. Harper said this week that the niqab, a face-covering veil worn by some Muslims, was "rooted in an anti-women culture" as he defended the government's desire to ban women from wearing a niqab during the oath of citizenship. While Canadians and Harper himself typically celebrate multiculturalism, the sudden furore over wearing the niqab comes as Harper's Conservatives warn Canadians they are under threat from "jihadist terrorism," a threat best met by new tougher security legislation Harper will campaign on. Thomas Mulcair, leader of the left-of-center opposition New Democratic Party, on Friday told Ottawa radio station CFRA that Harper was pandering to Islamophobia. "It's not dissimilar to what we see with the president of Russia, who uses a ...
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To the wire: the smugglers who get people into Syria for Islamic State 12.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Minibuses carry everyone from foreign would-be Isis jihadis to people who simply want to cross the border from Turkey to visit sick relatives

On an obscure rural road not far from the Syrian border, the minibus finally gives up the ghost. “It’s broken down,” the driver shrugs. “I will call someone else to get you to Syria.”

A friend arrives 15 minutes later in a small private car. Peeking into the minibus, he asks: “All of you to the wire?”

You have no idea what we see in Syria every day now. Our lives are like a horror movie.

Related: Turkish border guards sweep up fuel smugglers and Isis fighters alike

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Canada PM Stephen Harper calls niqab 'anti-women'; faces ridicule on Twitter 12.3.2015 DNA: Urban Tales
— Mary Ellen Davis (@RubyMcrae) March 12, 2015 Dream @pmharper , is this woman's outfit and headwear offensive to you too? #dresscodePM pic.twitter.com/dLOptfwEJx — Rob Bieber Ⓥ (@rob_bieber) March 12, 2015 Perhaps eager to teach his child a lesson in the lawmaking powers of the federal government, Vancouver writer Ryan Knighton tweeted:  Raining in Vancouver today. My eight-year-old daughter doesn't want to wear her rain coat. Please legislate. #dresscodePM — Ryan Knighton (@ryanknighton) March 11, 2015 The Canadian government moved last month to appeal a court ruling allowing Muslim women to wear face coverings while taking their citizenship oath. At the time, Harper said it was "offensive that someone would hide their identity at the very moment where they are committing to join the Canadian family." His most recent comments came in response to opposition leader Justin Trudeau, who on Tuesday accused the ruling Conservative party of fueling prejudice against Muslim Canadians. The #dresscodePM hashtag ...
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Lebanese TV host Rima Karaki: I don’t feel like a hero, it was self-respect 10.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
In Guardian interview, al-Jadeed presenter who cut off Islamist guest says she had a duty to stand up for herself When Rima Karaki cut off the mic after her guest, Hani Sibai, an Islamist sheikh, ordered her to “be silent”, little did she expect it would become a viral video sensation in Lebanon and around the world. Supporters online have hailed her for standing up for women’s rights against a patriarchal religious establishment that sought to subjugate them. But for Karaki herself, it was a simple question of ...
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IS militants forcing women with 'sexy eyes' to cover them with double veils 9.3.2015 Sify News
Islamic State (IS) militants are forcing women with "sexy eyes" to cover them by wearing double veils so that their eyes remain hidden.
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Stunning photos from the week gone by 9.3.2015 Rediff: News
Images of the events that shaped the world last week.
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Afghan artist in hiding after sexual harassment protest 8.3.2015 Hindustan Times: World
A young Afghan artist who walked through the streets of Kabul wearing a suit of armour featuring large breasts and buttocks in protest against sexual harassment has gone into hiding after receiving death ...
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Fashion on the Ration: 1940s Street Style review – pluck, hope, humour and grace 8.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Imperial War Museum, London
From designer air-raid onesies to homemade mascara, necessity is the marvellous mother of invention in this small but perfectly formed look at how style survived in wartime Britain

In the last months of the second world war, the British cosmetics company Yardley ran an advertisement that read: “To work for victory is not to say goodbye to charm. For good looks and good morale are the closest of allies.”

Related: Fashion on the ration: 1940s street-style – in pictures

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Pakistan isn't about burqa-clad women; it's a misconception: Aamina Sheikh 8.3.2015 CNN-IBN Top Stories
A file photo of Aamina Sheikh. On Women's Day, Aamina talks about her reasons behind discriminatory attitude towards women, and misconceptions about women in Pakistan.
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The Veil Series: a celebration of Muslim women's hijabs – in pictures 6.3.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

The Veil Series is a captivating body of work by photographic artist Sara Shamsavari, celebrating the way young Muslim women in London, Paris and New York express their individuality through vibrant hijab styles. The exhibition is part of the Women of the World Festival at London’s Royal Festival Hall until 29 March

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Afghan men wear burqas for women's rights march in Kabul - video report 6.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
A group of Afghan men wear burqas for a march in support of women's rights in Kabul. The demonstrators, associated with a group called Afghan Peace Volunteers, say they organised Thursday's march ahead of International Women's Day on 8 March. The march drew mixed reactions, with some locals heckling the men Continue reading...
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