User: demo Topic: Energy
Category: Coal
Last updated: Mar 22 2017 21:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Seven Things That Need to Happen to Keep Global Temperature Rise Below 2C 22.3.2017 Truthout.com
In late 2015, the world agreed to limit the global temperature rise to "well below 2C". Ever since the signing of the  Paris Agreement  on climate change,  scientists ,  think tanks  and  policymakers  have been scrambling to define exactly what meeting this temperature limit will mean in policy and investment terms. A new  report  released this week by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) is the latest attempt to address this question. Commissioned by the German government in its role this year as G20 president, the report sets out the "essential elements" needed to create an energy sector transition consistent with the Paris Agreement. The  G20  is a group of 20 major economies, including China, India, Germany, the UK and US, which  accounts  for 63% of global population and 83% of emissions. The IEA and IRENA each took a separate approach to modelling the most cost effective decarbonisation pathway, with the IEA using a so-called ...
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Plans for coal-fired power plants drop by almost half in 2016 22.3.2017 BBC: Business
A report suggests a "dramatic" decline in the number coal-fired power plants in pre-construction in 2016.
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Report: Climate outlook improves as fewer coal plants built 22.3.2017 AP Business
BEIJING (AP) -- Led by cutbacks in China and India, construction of new coal-fired power plants is falling worldwide, improving chances climate goals can be met despite earlier pessimism, three environmental groups said Wednesday....
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Report: Climate outlook improves as fewer coal plants built 22.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BEIJING (AP) — Led by cutbacks in China and India, construction of new coal-fired power plants is falling worldwide, improving chances climate goals can be met despite earlier pessimism, three environmental groups said Wednesday. A joint report by the groups CoalSwarm, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace follows a warning this week by two international agencies […]
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How Trump's Supreme Court Pick Quietly Wipes Out Environmental Cases 20.3.2017 Mother Jones
Faced with the Trump administration's assault on regulations, environmental advocates are planning to turn to the courts to limit some of the damage. Green groups are already crafting lawsuits to block any efforts to roll back rules on power plant emissions, vehicle pollution, coal mining, and pipeline permits. Environmentalists have been studying the record of Trump's Supreme Court nominee, 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch, whose Senate confirmation hearings begin Monday. They are trying to understand how he might handle cases on Obama-era climate initiatives, air pollution, and water quality, which may one day end up at the Supreme Court. Chief among their concerns are whether he will even allow them to have their day in court at all. "He’s not one of those judges who wants to swing the courthouse doors [open] to environmental suits," says Michael Gerrard, Columbia University Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. "It would lower their probability for success for those few ...
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Why the president’s big promises for coal miners may be empty 19.3.2017 Washington Post
Trump has vowed to roll back environmental regulations that the industry says are part of a “war on coal.” But while the industry still has a pulse, the prospects for the return of jobs are weak.
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Kansas court clears way for coal-fired power plant 18.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Topeka, Kan. • Kansas’ highest court on Friday cleared a major obstacle to the long-delayed construction of a big, new coal-fired power plant, rejecting an effort by an environment group to force the state to regulate emissions linked to climate change. The state Supreme Court upheld a 2014 decision by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment to give Sunflower Electric Power Corp. the go-ahead for its project. The utility wants to build an 895-megawatt plant adjacent to an existing one ou...
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World Bank indirectly backs harmful S-E Asian projects: watchdog 17.3.2017 Hindu: International
Says bank funds can increase poverty, social strife and promote projects which hasten climate change
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Editorial: New Utah mine lease is the beginning of coal's last gasp 17.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Elections have consequences. So it should be neither surprising nor all that depressing to hear that the new administration is reportedly about to keep a campaign promise and end the moratorium on coal leases on federal land. And it fits that Department of Interior has already approved a $23 million deal to allow the continued operation of the Sufco mine on the Greens Hollow tract, smack in the center of Utah. But, just as the news about coal mining on federal land should surprise no one, it is... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Eugene Robinson: A bellicose budget in Trump's own image 17.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
WASHINGTON • President Trump’s first budget is an attempt to reshape the federal government in his own image — crass, bellicose, short-sighted, unserious and ultimately hollow. Unsurprisingly, Trump titled it “America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again.” The reality is that if Congress were to accept these numbers — which it can’t possibly do — America would be made dumber, dirtier, hungrier and sicker. That may be Trump’s idea of greatness, but it’s certainly not mine. Would ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Trump budgets for a dumber, dirtier America 17.3.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
The president’s plan wouldn’t save much money, but it would punish his enemies.
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Trump's budget makes perfect sense and will fix America, and I will tell you why 17.3.2017 Washington Post
Trump's budget makes perfect sense and will fix America, and I will tell you why
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'Behind the Headlines': Congressional coal support, proposed DUI limit and Salt Lake Valley homeless shelters 17.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Rep. Jason Chaffetz and Sen. Mike Lee propose legislation to curb EPA regulations on Utah coal-power plants. The Salt Lake Area Restaurant Association asks Gov. Gary Hebert to veto a bill that would lower the legal blood-alcohol limit for drivers. And residents of South Salt Lake and West Valley City confront Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams over proposed locations for a new homeless shelter. On Friday at 9 a.m., Salt Lake Tribune reporters Emma Penrod and Matthew Piper, columnist Robert Gehrk...
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Here's How Donald Trump's Budget Screws Over the People Who Elected Him 17.3.2017 Mother Jones
President Donald Trump released his budget blueprint on Thursday morning and his administration is already playing defense. In an interview on MSNBC's Morning Joe, Office of Management and Budget chief Mick Mulvaney argued that the steep cuts (in some cases down to zero) to some government programs was necessary to ease the burden on the working man. "One of the questions we asked was, 'Can we really continue to ask a coal miner in West Virginia or a single mom in Detroit to pay for these programs?'" he said. "The answer was no. We can ask them to pay for defense—and we will—but we can't ask them to continue to pay for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting." This argument suggests an unfamiliarity with both coal miners and the budget itself—as things currently stand, a coal miner making $51,000 a year (roughly the median US household income) pays about 60 cents in taxes to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Mulvaney's misdirection gives away the game. Trump campaigned as a champion of rural ...
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Trump's budget would torpedo Obama's investments in climate change and clean energy 16.3.2017 Washington Post
Trump's budget would torpedo Obama's investments in climate change and clean energy
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Zinke finalizes Greens Hollow coal lease, would secure Utah's oldest mine 16.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Federal officials have finalized a 55-million-ton coal lease in a deal that ensures continued operations of Utah’s oldest and most productive coal mine and was heralded as a sign of the Trump administration’s pro-energy policies to come. The owner of the Sufco mine in Sanpete and Sevier counties delivered the winning bid of nearly $23 million last January in a process billed as “competitive” even though no other bids were submitted on the 6,175-acre Greens Hollow tract under the Fishlake and Ma...
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In Kentucky coal country, lawmakers open up to nuclear power 16.3.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Lawmakers in coal-producing Kentucky have voted to open the door to nuclear power, over objections from a legislator who called it a “kick in the teeth” to the beleaguered coal industry. The Kentucky House passed the bill 65-28 Wednesday, sending it to Gov. Matt Bevin. Bevin told Cincinnati radio station WKRC […]
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Chaffetz, Lee take aim at haze ruling that would reduce pollution at two Utah coal power plants 15.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
In the latest turn of the decade-long dispute over Utah’s Regional Haze Rule, Rep. Jason Chaffetz and Sen. Mike Lee introduced federal legislation to overturn a 2016 decision to require additional pollution controls at two Utah power plants. In a Monday announcement of the proposal, Chaffetz said the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency exceeded its authority when it partially rejected a plan drafted by Utah regulators and decided instead to require emissions-reduction steps at Rocky Mountain Po... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Chaffetz, Lee take aim at Utah haze ruling 15.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
In the latest turn of the decade-long dispute over Utah’s Regional Haze Rule, Rep. Jason Chaffetz and Sen. Mike Lee introduced federal legislation to overturn a 2016 decision to require additional pollution controls at two Utah power plants. In a Monday announcement of the proposal, Chaffetz said the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency exceeded its authority when it partially rejected a plan drafted by Utah regulators and decided instead to require emissions-reduction steps at Rocky Mountain Po... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Gorsuch’s environment record: Neither a clear friend or foe 15.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

By the time a lawsuit over pollution from a nuclear weapons plant had reached Judge Neil Gorsuch, it had crawled through the courts for more than two decades, outliving some of the landowners who said the contamination destroyed their property values. That pace didn’t sit well with Gorsuch, a judge for the Denver-based 10th U.S. […]
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