User: demo Topic: Energy
Category: Coal
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 01:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Replacing coal with natural gas is not a climate-friendly solution 21.9.2016 Seattle Times: Opinion

Two-thirds of natural gas in the country comes from fracking, which emits enough methane to rival the climate impacts of coal. Why follow two steps forward on climate with one step backward?
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Scientists know climate change is a threat. Politicians need to realize it, too. 21.9.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
That's why we and 373 other scientists have written a letter about what's at risk.
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America's first wave-produced power goes online 20.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii • Off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it feeds into Oahu’s power grid — the first wave-produced electricity to go online in the U.S. By some estimates, the ocean’s endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America’s energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation’s reliance on oil, gas and c...
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Great Barrier Reef damage costs shipper $30M 19.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Canberra, Australia • The Australian government reached a $29.6 million settlement with the owners of a Chinese coal carrier to pay for environmental damage caused when the ship ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef six years ago, the environment minister said Monday. The government had sued Shenzhen Energy Transport for at least $89 million (U.S.) in Australian Federal Court after the fully laden ship Shen Neng1 went off course in April 2010 and grounded on Douglas Shoal, 60 miles east of the t...
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A 'clean-energy champion?' Groups debate Rep. Mia Love's environmental stance 19.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A wealthy conservative trying to push the Republican Party into fighting climate change has dubbed Rep. Mia Love a “clean-energy champion” and is spending at least $100,000 on digital ads supporting her re-election. The ClearPath Action Fund is a new group created by Jay Faison, a North Carolina entrepreneur, and his interest in Love is based partly on her votes during her first term and partly on what she may become if given more time in office. “Mia Love is a candidate who wants to do the righ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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First wave-produced electricity in US goes online in Hawaii 19.9.2016 AP National
KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (AP) -- In the waters off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity....
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First wave-produced electricity in US goes online in Hawaii 19.9.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (AP) — In the waters off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it is fed into Oahu’s power grid […]
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Trump's climate science denial clashes with reality of rising seas in Florida 18.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

By Donald Trump’s account, scientists have tricked Americans into accepting that global warming is caused by the burning of fossil fuels.

“I’m not a big believer in man-made climate change,” he told the Miami Herald on one of the rare recent occasions when he has talked about it.

A few blocks from...

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Why a Donald Trump Victory Could Make Climate Catastrophe Inevitable 17.9.2016 Mother Jones
This story first appeared at TomDispatch.com . In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement—already endorsed by most nations—should be a complete no-brainer. That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world. Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It's worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) before a planetary catastrophe ensues. They disagreed, however, about much else. Some key countries were in outright conflict with other states (Russia with Ukraine, for ...
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Hesperus coal mine lays off workers 16.9.2016 Durango Herald
Feeling the pressures of a depressed industry, the King II coal mine in Hesperus has restructured, resulting in the lay-off of seven full-time employees.Since the beginning of the year, King II’s workforce has reduced by nearly 30 percent. GCC...
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Duke CEO says utility avoiding LGBT law fight 16.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Cary, N.C. • Duke Energy Corp. aims to stay out of the fight over North Carolina’s law limiting protections for LGBT people, the company’s CEO said, noting the company is heavily regulated by the state. “I’m in a regulated industry with responsibility for keeping the lights on, and my focus is there and attracting a workforce that makes us better, and that’s a diverse workforce,” CEO Lynn Good told The Associated Press. However, Good also said that while the largest electricity company in the U....
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AP Interview: Duke CEO says utility avoiding LGBT law fight 16.9.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

CARY, N.C. (AP) — Duke Energy Corp. is staying out of the fight over North Carolina’s law limiting protections for LGBT people because as a heavily-regulated business it wants to stay away from the hot-button issue, the company’s CEO said. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory, who worked for Duke Energy for nearly 30 years, staunchly supports […]
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Will Trumpism, Brexit and Geopolitical Exceptionalism Sink the Planet? 15.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and Coast Guard swimmers test the integrity of a melt pond on sea ice in the Chukchi Sea on July 9, 2010, before drilling holes through which instruments can be deployed to collect data. (Photo: NASA ) In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement -- already endorsed by most nations -- should be a complete no-brainer. That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world. Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It's worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2.0 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) ...
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Mass Fish Die-Offs Are the New Normal: Climate Change Shuts Down a Montana River 15.9.2016 Truthout.com
A dead mountain whitefish floats in the Yellowstone River in Montana. (Photo: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks) An unprecedented fish kill in Montana's iconic Yellowstone River has brought the West's climate future in focus. Scientists say climate change killed the fish by creating a perfect environment for microscopic parasites, deadly to fish, to thrive. It's bad news for the West's outdoor economy. A dead mountain whitefish floats in the Yellowstone River in Montana. (Photo: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks) Early in the morning on August 19, 2016, Chad Jacobson, a 36-year-old Montanan, lifelong fisherman and soon-to-be father received a text message from a friend who is one of Montana's many fly-fishing guides. "Can you believe they shut down the Yellowstone?" said the text. Jacobson grew up in a family of fishermen and makes it a priority to get out on the rivers as often as possible throughout the year. He was stunned. "I mean, you see this kind of stuff happening in rivers around here, it's ...
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DIVIDED AMERICA: Losing out to China, workers embrace Trump 14.9.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

HANNIBAL, Ohio (AP) — Crushed by Chinese competition and feeling betrayed by mainstream politicians, workers in the hills of eastern Ohio are embracing Donald Trump and his tough talk on trade. For decades, they and others living across the Ohio River in West Virginia found work in coal mines and at a local aluminum plant […]
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More Than 150 Million Workers in India Just Staged the Largest Strike in History to Resist Neoliberalism 14.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Trade unionists in India staged a nationwide strike last week that affected key sectors of the nation's economy, including transportation, healthcare, finance, energy, coal, steel, defense and education.  Organizers reportedly claimed  that more than 150 million people took part and that it cost the economy some $2.5 billion, making the strike the "world's largest."  Those numbers could not be independently confirmed, but this much is clear: Workers are angry at the Indian government and unwilling to accept its neoliberal economic agenda without a fight. Union leaders had asked for negotiations in March, and called the September 2 strike when government officials ignored them. On August 30, in a last-minute attempt to head off the strike, the government proposed to increase the minimum wage for unskilled workers employed by the central government, from about $3.70 to $5.20 per day. The offer wasn't enough. Union leaders rejected the proposal, which didn't begin to address their broader, far-reaching ...
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Poll: Americans favor slightly higher bills to fight warming 14.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Most Americans are willing to pay a little more each month to fight global warming — but only a tiny bit, according to a new poll. Still, environmental policy experts hail that as a hopeful sign. Seventy-one percent want the federal government to do something about global warming, including 6 percent who think the government should act even though they are not sure that climate change is happening, according to a poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs ...
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Poll: Americans favor slightly higher bills to fight warming 14.9.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans are willing to pay a little more each month to fight global warming — but only a tiny bit, according to a new poll. Still, environmental policy experts hail that as a hopeful sign. Seventy-one percent want the federal government to do something about global warming, including 6 percent who […]
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Poll: Americans favor slightly higher bills to fight warming 14.9.2016 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Most Americans are willing to pay a little more each month to fight global warming - but only a tiny bit, according to a new poll. Still, environmental policy experts hail that as a hopeful sign....
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DIVIDED AMERICA: How China fueled pain and Trump support 14.9.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

HANNIBAL, Ohio (AP) — Crushed by Chinese competition and feeling betrayed by mainstream politicians, workers in the hills of eastern Ohio are embracing Donald Trump and his tough talk on trade. For decades, they and others living across the Ohio River in West Virginia found work in coal mines and at a local aluminum plant […]
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1 to 20 of 22,709