User: demo Topic: Energy
Category: Coal
Last updated: Aug 29 2015 04:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Colorado ahead of the curve on methane, VOC regs 29.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
With all the worry over the future of coal, residents of Northwest Colorado can breathe a sigh relief knowing the state is ahead of the curve on the Environmental Protection Agency’s new methane and volatile organic compound regulations. “While the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is still in the process of reviewing the EPA’s proposed rule, they anticipate it will complement and not interfere with steps Colorado has already taken in striking a balance between the state's need for a healthy oil and gas industry and resident concern about health, safety and the environment,” said Gov. John Hickenlooper in a statement. Chris Colclasure, planning and policy program manager for Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Air Pollution Control Division, said he doesn’t think oil and gas developers in the state have much to adapt to under the federal regulations. “It’s certainly easier for the state to implement, because we’ve got some experience,” he said. Colorado has stricter ...
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Beautiful Northumberland, off the beaten track 28.8.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Author Ann Cleeves describes the draw of her native Northumberland – and the parts most visitors miss in its former industrial corner. Plus more lovely but quiet bits of Britain Best seafood restaurants on the Northumberland coast Northumberland is a wild and beautiful place. Tourists visit for the history, for the hills and the wide, empty beaches. They drive west to Hexham and Hadrian’s Wall or north to Alnwick and Holy Island, but they usually ignore the coastal plain in the south east corner of the county where once coal was mined and ships built. If you take the Spine Road – the A189 from Newcastle – and look out over the flat farmland towards the sea, the view is almost entirely industrial. You see the chimneys of the power station that used to provide energy for the Alcan smelter, a giant offshore wind farm and the cranes at Blyth Docks. But nature is taking over again, now the heavy industry has retreated. The subsidence pools and the recently planted reed beds just inland from the dunes at ...
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Digging into big coal's climate connections 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
The bankruptcy filings of a Virginia coal firm have shone a rare light on a murky web of corporate attacks on climate science. Have you heard about the group that has abused open records laws to harass climate scientists across the United States? The organization behind North Carolina’s ban on using sea level science to inform coastal planning? The institution attacking renewable energy targets ? These are all activities of the innocuous-sounding Energy and Environment Legal Institute (E&E Legal). Now, thanks to a scoop by Lee Fang at The Intercept, we now know where some of their money comes ...
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Run for your lives, climate campaigners are sophisticated and can tie their own shoelaces 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Coal lobbyists think Australians should be shocked that climate campaigners have strategies and are coordinated

Before I reveal some chilling truths about environmental campaigners, you’d best grab your nearest cuddly toy and take refuge behind the sofa.

As government ministers, conservative commentators and coal lobbyists have warned us in recent days, the greenies are coming.

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Don't believe the hype. Coal employs fewer people than McDonald's | Ben Oquist 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
If Tony Abbott wants to focus on jobs, he has to abandon his obsession with coal – a capital intensive industry that creates fewer jobs than the horse industry The prime minister has repeatedly said that the next election should be about jobs. He has attempted to kick-start a new “economy versus environment” strategy in relation to a coal mining. According to the ABS a huge 0.3% of Australians are currently employed in coal mining. If the coal industry trebled in size tomorrow it still wouldn’t be enough to create jobs for the extra 101,900 people who have become unemployed since Tony Abbott became prime minister. Anyone who has ever seen an open cut coal mine will understand why they don’t create a lot of jobs. Work that was once done by men with picks and shovels is now done by explosives and enormous machines. Economists call such industries “capital intensive” which is another way of saying “doesn’t create many ...
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The day we stopped Europe’s biggest polluter in its tracks | John Jordan 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
Earlier this month, 1,500 protesters forced the temporary closure of a vast lignite mine in Germany. It was terrifiyng, exhilarating – and direct action at its best This month, I broke the law. I wasn’t alone; I was with 1,500 others, many of whom had never broken any law for their beliefs before. Together we managed to shut down Europe’s biggest source of CO2 emissions : RWE’s lignite mines in the Rhineland in Germany. In total, around 800 of us were arrested, and hundreds of us refused to cooperate with the authorities by withholding our names and IDs. This hampered the bureaucracy so badly that we were released without charge. It was the world’s largest act of disobedience against the mining of fossil fuels – and it might be the spark that ignites a rising, cross-border movement of disobedience for climate ...
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Lammy and Khan commit to divestment if elected as London mayor 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Labour MPs say they will ditch Boris Johnson’s policy and pull out City Hall’s £4.8bn pension fund from oil, coal and gas companies

Boris Johnson has come under increased pressure to move the capital’s finances of out fossil fuels, as Labour party’s Sadiq Khan and David Lammy both committed to do so if they are elected as London mayor next May.

“We’ve got hundreds of millions of pounds invested in all sorts of things. I’m going to lead by example and say we’re not going to invest anymore in fossil fuels,” Khan said in an interview with Guardian columnist Owen Jones on Monday.

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What will happen to oil and gas workers as the world turns carbon neutral? 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Building a wind farm or solar energy project is nothing professionals in fossil fuels can’t manage, but there are too few programmes to help them retrain

Adriaan Kamp used to be a die-hard oilman. After 17 years at Anglo-Dutch oil company Shell, the 54-year-old Dutchman now runs a consultancy based in Oslo advising national governments on transitioning to cleaner energy.

“In 2007 to 2008, we were looking at future energy scenarios in the Shell Group [and] there was a question on my desk about how do we play with renewables,” he says. “And from there, the journey started.”

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The Corporations Funding the Lawyers to Fight the Clean Power Plan 26.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout combats corporate power by bringing you trustworthy, independent news. Join our mission by making a donation now! Lawyers from coal-dependent states, led by West Virginia, are challenging President Obama's Clean Power Plan . Joining their effort is an army of industry-funded law firms that specialize in fighting the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Together, they will argue that the EPA does not have any authority under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act to issue the carbon regulations; they will also contest the legality of the " fence line " used to set state emission targets. Yet, buried in coverage of the litigation is the fact that the coalition suing the EPA is connected to some of the largest electric utility companies in the country - and many have purposefully kept themselves at arms' length so that their customers never know they are funding lawyers who are working to stop one of  President Obama's main pillars to fight climate change. Policymakers, regulators, and ...
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Protestors Occupy Lignite Coal Mine in Germany 26.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Four months before world governments meet in Paris to negotiate the deal they claim will "save the climate", 1500 protestors took matters into their own hands by entering an opencast lignite mine owned by energy provider RWE in western Germany. With this massive act of civil disobedience on 15th August they successfully blocked four of the mine's five diggers, bringing the destructive machines to a halt for most of the day. Under the slogan "Ende Gelaende", which loosely translates into "this far and no further", the action brought together people from all different kind of backgrounds and countries, old and young, experienced and newcomers, to the world of civil disobedience. They where united by their determination to stop the exploration of an energy source, which is destroying entire landscapes at the same time as being a major driver of climate change in Europe. Extracting and burning lignite and coal is the most CO2-intense way of producing electricity. Even conservative estimations state that in ...
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Public Utilities Commission testimony looks at pollution, carbon costs 26.8.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Environmental groups and doctors back the federal government's 'social costs of carbon' guidelines, while business groups and energy companies urge caution.
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Top campaigners call for mass climate action ahead of Paris conference 26.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Noam Chomsky, Desmond Tutu, Naomi Klein and Vivienne Westwood among group calling for mass mobilisation on the scale of slavery abolition and anti-apartheid movements

Desmond Tutu, Vivienne Westwood, Naomi Klein and Noam Chomsky are among a group of prolific figures who will issue a mass call to action on Thursday ahead of the UN’s crunch climate change conference in Paris in December.

They call for mass mobilisation on the scale of the slavery abolition and anti-apartheid movements to trigger “a great historical shift”.

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China Remains a Key Commodities Player 26.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The fear that China’s appetite for commodities is falling is rattling markets, but the country’s sheer scale means it will continue to shape the commodities trade.
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Bushfires, heatwaves and early deaths: the climate is changing before our eyes | Tim Flannery 26.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

In an exclusive extract from his new book, Atmosphere of Hope, Tim Flannery argues that recent events in Australia and around the world show how global warming is much more than a debate about scientific projections

When I wrote The Weather Makers, I laid out the state of climate science as it was understood in 2005. The book received much acclaim, but it was also criticised by climate-change sceptics as extremist and alarmist.

Since the book was published, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has completed two major summaries, in the form of its fourth and fifth assessment reports, and thousands of scientific publications have added to our understanding of how Earth’s climate system responds to carbon pollution.

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Mining stocks drive FTSE 100 rebound 25.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

BHP Billiton leads peers higher after world’s biggest miner promises to slash spending to shore up dividends

Mining stocks that were hammered on Black Monday clawed back some ground on Tuesday after major companies announced cost cuts that are likely to preserve expected dividend payouts.

Shares in BHP Billiton jumped by 5.5% to £10.21 – despite the world’s biggest miner reporting a 52% slump in annual profits to a decade low – after the group said it would slash spending to shore up dividends.

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Interactive energy planning tool developed by NITI Aayog 25.8.2015 New Kerala: World News
New Delhi, Aug 25 : The NITI (NationalInstitution for Transforming India) Aayog, which has replaced the Planning Commission, on Tuesday said it has developed an interactive energy planning tool, which aims to explore a range of potential future energy scenarios for India up to 2047.
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In Appalachia, the Coal Industry Is in Collapse, but the Mountains Aren't Coming Back 25.8.2015 Truthout.com
In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountain tops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley's all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that's how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, West Virginia. "They're going to blast that one next," he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He's referring to a process known as "mountain-top removal," in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. "And then it'll be just blank space," he adds. "Like the Taylor Swift song." Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from his taut skin. Dipping tobacco is tucked into his right cheek. He has a head of cropped blond curls that jog some memory of mine, but I can't quite figure out what it is. He's pointing at a peak named Coal River Mountain. These days, though, it's known to ...
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Lying by emission: Peabody Coal can’t handle the truth about the cost of carbon pollution 25.8.2015 MinnPost
Peabody Energy, the world’s biggest private-sector coal company, is having a tough time of things. As coal prices have declined over the last year, the inaugural title holder of Newsweek’s least environmentally-friendly company ranking has seen its stock price plummet to under $1 and its credit ratings downgraded to sub-investment grade. Last month, in the week leading up to the finalization of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan to reduce the United States’ dependence on coal, Peabody posted a quarterly net loss of $1 billion. Leili Fatehi Also having a tough time is the whole of the Earth and everything living on it. Coal power is contributing to climate change, biodiversity loss, deforestation, sea acidification and other devastating impacts with huge economic and human costs. In Minnesota alone, fossil fuel power production is costing more than $2.1 billion each year in health and environmental impacts. Pollution from Minnesota Power and Xcel Energy’s coal plants alone are ...
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Weatherwatch: The future is kite powered 24.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Wind turbines are controversial. They are accused of being blots on the landscape, expensive to run and need good winds to work. But the critics could be silenced with a totally new way of generating wind power – using kites. This is a serious proposition. Power-generating kites are far more sophisticated than toy kites, and designed like aircraft wings capable of flying in most conditions.

Related: Our weather pages are now bringing you real sunshine | Chris Elliott: Open door

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The world has noted Australia's lack of ambition on climate change | Connie Hedegaard 24.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Australia’s politicians seem to have accepted that climate change is happening and must be addressed urgently. So why are they delaying?

For an outsider to understand another country’s climate policy is never easy. Australia is certainly no exception. As a European observer, the recent debate about climate action in Australia is particularly puzzling.

Related: Former EU climate chief Hedegaard backs fossil fuel divestment

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