User: demo Topic: Energy
Category: Solar
Last updated: May 25 2015 22:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Round-the-world solar plane readies for Pacific crossing 25.5.2015 New Kerala: Technology
Read Full story of ' Round-the-world solar plane readies for Pacific crossing ' at newkerala.com.
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A Fossil-Fueled Fantasy 25.5.2015 Truthout.com
Extracting coal from the ground and disposing of its toxic byproducts makes a dirty mess no matter how it's burned. But this "clean coal" ruse is conjuring up billions of dollars in government subsidies. Burning the dregs from spent oil wells releases yet more carbon into the atmosphere, stoking climate change. Zigging and Zagging Down a Slippery Slope, an OtherWords cartoon by Khalil Bendib. Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That's Truthout's goal - support our work with a donation today! Newfangled carbon-capture power plants supposedly burn coal without poisoning the planet. They don’t. Extracting coal from the ground and disposing of its toxic byproducts makes a dirty mess no matter how it’s burned. But this “clean coal” ruse is conjuring up billions of dollars in  government subsidies . Take the 110-megawatt Boundary Dam plant in  Canada’s Saskatchewan province , the world’s first carbon-capture operation. It cost $1.2 billion to get it switched on last year. That’s several ...
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Solar plane set for Pacific crossing 25.5.2015 CNN: Top Stories
The Solar Impulse 2, the experimental plane attempting to fly around the world without a single drop of fuel, is set to take off from China early Tuesday morning on the most challenging and dangerous part of its journey yet.
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Solar Impulse faces 'moment of truth' 25.5.2015 BBC: Technology
In what will be its greatest challenge yet, the zero-fuel aeroplane Solar Impulse will try to fly non-stop from China to Hawaii - a journey of more than 8,000km across the Pacific Ocean.
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Solar aircraft to be flown across the Pacific in world record bid 25.5.2015 Guardian: Environment

Longest solo plane flight in history will be attempted in Solar Impulse II aircraft powered by nothing but sunlight

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The benefits of solar do outweigh its costs. Some have a hard time accepting it 25.5.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
A new Grattan Institute report on rooftop solar says its economic costs exceed its benefits by $9bn. That’s true only if you don’t include all the benefits Oh dear. Here we go again. The solar industry is clearly winning the battle to turn the global electricity industry upside down and inside out. The plunging cost of battery storage will accelerate that process. It’s just that some people have a hard time accepting it. The latest big headlines are from the Grattan Institute, which wrote in a report that the economic costs of rooftop solar outweighed the benefits by $9bn. When you actually look at the numbers, they’re a witch’s brew of mistaken assumptions and omissions. All the supposed negative impacts on the network, if they exist, are likely to be reversed when batteries come in, and PV households will be the first to install them, potentially making the grid much stronger, if the utilities provide the right incentives. Why not have headlines which say the investment people have made in PV is soon ...
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VIDEO: Solar plane pilot set for six-day leg 25.5.2015 BBC: Technology
The first round-the-world solar-powered flight, known as the Solar Impulse Two, is hoping to make the next and most difficult leg of its journey.
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The UK town that loves solar power 23.5.2015 BBC: Business
Where is the solar 'capital' of the UK?
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Shell boss endorses warnings about fossil fuels and climate change 23.5.2015 Guardian: Environment

Ben van Beurden agrees that we need to capture the carbon emissions of fossil fuel reserves, but predicts that the world will be ‘zero carbon’ by the century’s end

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Efforts to curb solar industry subsidies fail amid opposition from Iron Rangers 22.5.2015 MinnPost
An effort to curb state subsidies and other perks for Minnesota firms making solar panels fizzled in the final days of the legislative session amid opposition from an Iron Range company with political ties to the DFL. But the company, Silicon Energy of Mountain Iron, will soon face scrutiny on another front. Auditor Jim Nobles Legislative Auditor James Nobles says he will investigate the $7 million in government loans for Silicon Energy as part of a wider probe of a state agency’s controversial economic development projects. “Given the size and importance of it, it will be in our scope, for sure,” Nobles said. Nobles is evaluating whether the agency, the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board (IRRRB), has made smart bets with loans and grants intended to create jobs in northern Minnesota. The agency uses taconite taxes paid by mining companies to finance economic development.    Silicon Energy has fallen far short of its goals for job creation despite the IRRRB loans and the state subsidies. Some ...
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Who are the first victims of climate change? 22.5.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Climate change is all about degrees.
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Saudi Arabia's solar-for-oil plan is a ray of hope 22.5.2015 Guardian: Environment

Talk by the world’s biggest oil exporter of giving up fossil fuels and embracing solar and wind energy adds momentum towards a global climate change deal

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How Solar Is Lighting the Way for Recovery in Nepal 22.5.2015 American Prospect
(Photo: Milap Dwa) Milap Dwa and Chij Kumar​, technicians from Gham Power​, installing a 120-watt solar PV system kit on top of one of the few houses in Barpak, Gorkha, that are still standing. In the days following Nepal’s 7.8-magnitude earthquake on April 25, as massive power outages complicated relief efforts, Sandeep Giri and his coworkers were shaken but determined to help. Giri, who was born and raised in Nepal, is the CEO of  Gham Power , a solar company that’s been operating in Nepal for the last five years. After the earthquake, Gham Power’s employees sprung into action to deploy solar power systems that could power lights and mobile charging stations for relief workers and the displaced. Besides basic needs like medical attention, food, water, and shelter, electricity is a major issue in the wake of a disaster, says Giri. “First, you don't want to be in the dark, as it's scary, you don't feel safe, and it is also very cumbersome to get or administer relief without light. Second, in this day and ...
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Welcome to Baoding, China's most polluted city 22.5.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
In February, Baoding was given the unwanted title of possessing the worst air quality in the whole of China. Jennifer Duggan pays a visit – and discovers a city desperate to reinvent itself as a pioneer of renewable energy How China’s pollution problem impacts on its people - in pictures It is a rare blue-skied day in the city of Baoding, in north-eastern China. It’s not even that clear, but the hazy sky is as blue as it gets here. Most days, the sky is obscured by a thick blanket of smog. Baoding, a city of 10 million people, was named in February as China’s most polluted city by the Ministry of Environmental Protection , based on air pollution figures gathered for 2014. By mid-May of this year, the city had only enjoyed 16 days of air quality that could be considered “good” by the official classification. It was much better when I was young – the air was very clean. We rarely see blue skies now The great irony is that, in 2010, Baoding was named ​as ​a pilot of China’s project to introduce low-carbon ...
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Buying organic isn't just about personal health 22.5.2015 LA Times: Opinion
To the editor: Walking or working out is an investment in our health, instead of spending that time making more money. Similarly, buying organic food is investing not only in our own health, but in everyone's health. ("Is organic food worth the higher price? Many experts say no," May 19)
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Why rooftop solar users should pay to maintain the grid 22.5.2015 LA Times: Opinion
To the editor: Evan Gillespie fails to point out some important reasons the California Public Utilities Commission might rework a rate structure that he says protects those who use the least amount of energy. ("PUC may short-circuit California's fair, progressive electricity rate policy," op-ed,...
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Oil companies should bear the risks of drilling and production 22.5.2015 LA Times: Top News
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Brazil's ditching of climate change targets may not signal policy shift 22.5.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Dilma Rousseff’s reneging on a plan to limit CO2 emissions had many fearing the worst but June’s summit with the US may simply mean a delayed announcement

First it was there. Then it was gone. The long-awaited announcement of Brazil’s new climate target came and went with a sleight of hand that caused an uproar among environmentalists this week.

But rather than signalling a shift in policy, as some had feared, the sudden appearance and disappearance of the country’s CO2 reduction goals appears to have more to do with diplomatic mistakes, realpolitik priorities and the greater importance of the US than China, the Guardian has learned.

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US military space plane begins latest secret mission 22.5.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Mystery surrounds the fourth unmanned mission of the X-37B, which took off from Cape Canaveral on 20 May

The US air force’s X-37B robotic space plane launched on 20 May from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, adjacent to Nasa’s Kennedy Space Centre. This will be the spacecraft’s fourth unmanned mission. As before, most details are classified.

Unclassified tests include a new “ion engine” and the exposure of various materials to see how they degrade in space.

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Europe Seeks Model to Repel U.S. Web Giants 22.5.2015 Wall St. Journal: Europe
Policy makers worry Europe’s job generators are at the mercy of U.S.-owned digital companies, writes Stephen Fidler.
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