User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-Independent
Category: Education
Last updated: Nov 23 2017 03:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Do Birdsong and Human Speech Share Biological Roots? 23.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds?
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Scientific team selected to conduct independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico 22.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico.“American communities across the Gulf of Mexico depend on their access to, as well as the long term sustainability of, red snapper,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “I look forward to the insights this project will provide as we study and manage this valuable resource.”
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Albatrosses in decline from fishing and environmental change 22.11.2017 Environmental News Network
The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (20 November) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Three studies from UTA's clear lab detect harmful pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near natural gas extraction sites 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Three new research studies from the University of Texas at Arlington have found harmful pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near unconventional natural gas extraction sites.
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Refining Pesticides to Kill Pests, Not Bees 21.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pyrethroid pesticides are effective. Sometimes too effective.
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Study looks at why ring-tailed lemurs raise a stink when they flirt with potential mates 20.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
A University of Toronto study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it likely helps their chances in securing a mate.Ring-tailed lemurs are Strepsirrhines, a sub-order of primates who share a common ancestor with humans. They are very social animals, living in large groups with females dominating the group. Like other lemurs, they huddle in large groups in order to keep warm and maintain social bonds, with lower ranking males often excluded.
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Mismanagement, Fraud and Worker Abuse at Charter Schools Are Driving School Staff to Unionize 20.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Unionized teachers with ASPIRA charter school network rally outside an ASPIRA high school to convince the company's management to come to terms on a contract on March 9, 2017, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Charter school teachers and staff are increasingly seeking union representation. Issues such as job security, salary, benefits and decent working hours have been catalysts driving collective bargaining efforts. Pro-union workers also want a larger say in decisions impacting school management and measures of student learning. Unionized teachers with ASPIRA charter school network rally outside an ASPIRA high school to convince the company's management to come to terms on a contract on March 9, 2017, in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images) Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a one-time or monthly donation by clicking here. Nearly 30 ...
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Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation 19.11.2017 Truthout.com
Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) In a time of deep political, social and economic uncertainty for everyone (except the ultra-rich), Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin provide some theoretical and practical guidance for the left. This Truthout interview is an effort to help reimagine a realistic social order in an age when the old order is dying but the new has yet to be born. Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! We live in an age of illegitimate neoliberal hegemony and soaring political uncertainty. The evidence is all around: citizen disillusionment over mainstream political parties and the traditional conservative-liberal divide, massive inequality, ...
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Reimagining nation, reasserting region 18.11.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Genomic Study Explores Evolution of Gentle 'Killer Bees' in Puerto Rico 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A genomic study of Puerto Rico's Africanized honey bees – which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” – reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. According to the researchers, these changes likely contributed to the bees' rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years.
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Study Reveals Structure and Origins of Glacial Polish on Yosemite's Rocks 16.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left highly polished surfaces on many of the region's rock formations. These smooth, shiny surfaces, known as glacial polish, are common in the Sierra Nevada and other glaciated landscapes.
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University of Oregon research maps major shifts in Colorado River history 16.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Geologists have long debated how and when the Colorado River made its first connection to the ocean. In a new study, a team led by the UO’s Becky Dorsey has helped pull the river’s story together.The river did not, as many thought, simply roar down out of the Colorado Plateau and pour into the Gulf of California.
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Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life 15.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption – not just organism death – are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use. So reports a new study published this week in Elementa.
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How to Keep Cows Happy 15.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Corrals are used on livestock farms around the world to round up the animals when they need to be weighed or vaccinated. New research now shows that removing splashes of colors, shadows or water puddles from corrals, keeping noise levels down and not using dogs and electric prods can dramatically reduce the stress cattle experience. Maria Lúcia Pereira Lima of the Instituto de Zootecnia Sertãozinho in Brazil is the lead author of this study in Springer’s journal Tropical Animal Health and Production.
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Pesticides May Cause Bumblebees to Lose Their Buzz, Study Finds 14.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new University of Stirling study has found.
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Synthetic circuits can harvest light energy 14.11.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
By organizing pigments on a DNA scaffold, an MIT-led team of researchers has designed a light-harvesting material that closely mimics the structure of naturally occurring photosynthetic structures.
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Southern Movement Assembly Creates a Framework With a Labor Sensibility for Southern Struggles 14.11.2017 Truthout.com
The Southern Movement Assembly's strategic framework operates on the principle of social unionism, seeing workplace and community issues as interconnected, and bringing them together in a broader struggle for economic justice. A discussion with Southern Movement Assembly coordinators Libby Devlin and Saladin Muhammad, and Project South founder Rita Valenti. Libby Devlin, Saladin Muhammad, and Rita Valenti participate in the Worker Justice Assembly at SMA VII. (Photo: Southern Movement Assembly [SMA Vll]) Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 90th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this ...
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VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration 14.11.2017 Environmental News Network
We’re all familiar with tipping points, when crossing what might seem a minor threshold can lead to drastically different outcomes—the Super Bowl favorite that falls to last place with injury to a single lineman, a tomato seedling that surges skyward the moment it tops the shadowy confines of its clay pot.
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New Map of Worldwide Croplands Supports Food and Water Security 14.11.2017 Environmental News Network
ndia has the highest net cropland area while South Asia and Europe are considered agricultural capitals of the world.A new map was released today detailing croplands worldwide in the highest resolution yet, helping to ensure global food and water security in a sustainable way.
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15,000 scientists from 184 countries warn of dire future for humanity 14.11.2017 TreeHugger
Humankind is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperiled biosphere, the authors write.
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