User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-National
Category: Lifestyle and Psychology
Last updated: Oct 21 2014 08:14 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In Laguna Beach, kelp has arrived -- and it's raising a stink 21.10.2014 LA Times: Environment
Warmer air and water temperatures, combined with overseas tropical storms, delivered an ecologically desirable but olfactory disagreeable gift to the shores of Laguna Beach this summer: copious amounts of kelp.
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Principles of Simply Sustainable Living 16.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Would you believe me if I told you that my inspiration for working on the environment came en route to living a beautiful life à la Martha Stewart (my former boss), Julia Child, Emily Post, and Alexandra Stoddard - domestic doyennes? To me, living a beautiful life is actually about respect - for oneself, for others and I maintain, for the environment. Taking the time to notice what's beautiful and to savor it, and when necessary, to protect it. The fact is, we all are visitors on this precious Earth - fortunate to wake every single day to the wonder and resources that surrounds us. Here's an idea to consider based on personal study of yoga and the environment. "Namaste" loosely translated means, "I bow to you." I've taken this translation one step further to encompass honoring all of life and planet Earth. Consider that you can practice "Namaste" outside of yoga through these simply sustainable steps: Every little thing you do is magic Never underestimate the power of one. One little step after another ...
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What Role, If Any, Should CSR Have at Retail? 15.10.2014 Yahoo: Business

What Role, If Any, Should CSR Have at Retail?When you think about the different ways that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) transpires throughout daily life, examples seen at retail will often come to mind. Such examples include the sale of green products, responsible ingredients and manufacturing claims (i.e. Fair Trade), or re-usable bags for purchase. More often than not, there...


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Let's grow a better future for the Pacific 10.10.2014 Oxfam International RSS main feed

Oxfam works with communities in the Pacific to make sure people can earn a sustainable living and grow a reliable source of good food.

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BT, Carlsberg, Coca-Cola, Unilever launch Collectively site 7.10.2014 GreenBiz.com

Consumer and tech giants are joining with Forum for the Future and the VICE design team on this site to reach consumers. Hello, millennials?

BT, Carlsberg, Coca-Cola, Unilever launch Collectively site
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The Battle to Be King of Ibiza Nightlife 5.10.2014 Yahoo: Politics

The Battle to Be King of Ibiza NightlifeThe global capital of clubbing has a secret—there's an underground war being waged to be the top club impresario in town. May the richest—ahem—best man win.


Netflix deal for 'Crouching Tiger' sequel upsets top theater chains 1.10.2014 LA Times: Business
The Netflix deal to finance Weinstein Co.'s "Crouching Tiger" sequel is opening a new front in the long-simmering conflict between Hollywood studios and theater owners.
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Food Tank's Fall Reading List: 20 Great Books About Food 1.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food Tank has selected 20 books that entertain, inform and reaffirm the importance of food and agriculture. From sustainable seafood to ethical eating to field guides for food activists, these books highlight innovative and creative methods that are creating a better, more sustainable food system while educating and informing eaters and consumers. The authors and editors that have contributed to this list make up some of the world's leading experts on food justice and sustainable eating. Food Tank hopes the facts and information in these books will not only inspire people already involved in the food movement but also encourage readers to share and educate others. American Catch by Paul Greenberg In 2005, five billion pounds of seafood were imported into the United States. Greenberg takes a deep look into the seafood hubs of the U.S. and attempts to explain why 91 percent of the seafood North Americans eat is, in fact, imported. Through analyzing current crises, oil spills and mining projects, Greenberg ...
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Homeowners, Environmentalists Square Off Over Nantucket Erosion 29.9.2014 Boston Globe: Latest
Normally, a story pitting the Nantucket’s swells against its hippies would lead to a lot of giggling on the mainland. This time, however, both sides make compelling arguments in a fight to save the island’s ...
Consumerism booms as Cambodia embraces once-forbidden capitalism 29.9.2014 Health
By Prak Chan Thul PHNOM PENH (Reuters) - Chy Sila has come a long way since he invested his $500 life savings in a small shop in Cambodia's capital to sell bootleg music and pirated movies. Fast-forward 16 years and Cambodians are now watching the films he distributes not on scratchy DVDs but in a $5 million multiplex theater, a joint venture with Thailand's Major Cineplex and the centerpiece of a new mall owned by Japanese retail giant Aeon that drew 2 million visitors in its opening month. ...
New Survey Uncovers the Lure of the City 25.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What attracts us to city life? A new survey offers some insights. A thousand urbanites - young and old - across major cities in the U.S. were contacted by Sasaki Associates, a planning and design firm based outside of Boston. The survey confirms what many of us who live in major cities already know to be true - there are so many opportunities to eat great food, see new things, and people watch, why would you want to live anywhere else? Who needs peace and quiet when you have the run of the opera, street festivals, and sports games, something different every night? But beyond the obvious, some of the numbers may surprise. These numbers can certainly help smart urban leaders continue to make city life as compelling as possible. Those surveyed live in San Francisco, Chicago, Austin, New York, Boston, and Washington, DC. Here are some other highlights: What do you love most about your city? More than 40 percent cited the restaurants and food; while 32 percent said local attractions; 24 percent said historic ...
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Why the Culture War Will Never Die 25.9.2014 American Prospect
Depending on how you define it, the American culture war between liberals and conservatives can stretch back all the way to the nineteenth century. But I prefer to date its current iteration to the 1960s, when the hippies and the squares gazed across a high school football field at one another and said, "Man, I hate those guys." However the actual 1960s played out, in our memories, the hippies were definitely the good guys, and the winners in the end. (This is in no small part because liberals created all the novels, TV shows, and movies that chronicled the period.) They may have been a little silly, but there's one thing that's undeniably true: They had all the fun. While the squares were getting buzz cuts, convincing themselves that the Vietnam War was a great idea, and nodding along with Richard Nixon's encomiums to the Silent Majority, the hippies were getting high, dancing to cool music, and above all, getting laid. And the squares are still mad about it, even the ones who weren't actually born ...
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No Need to Sacrifice the Planet’s Arteries to Save Her Lungs 23.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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When losing hurts worse than winning feels good 23.9.2014 World
GLENEAGLES, Scotland (AP) — Jim Furyk is the only player in the last 25 years to experience both ends of emotion in that moment the Ryder Cup is over. He knows how empty it feels to lose the decisive game. And he has been soaked in a celebration of ...
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No Need to Sacrifice the Planet's Arteries to Save Her Lungs 23.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From the flood-prone coastline of Bangladesh to East Africa's drought-stricken farm lands, climate change hits people hardest who have least contributed to it. World governments have agreed to mobilize $100 billion a year for climate mitigation and adaptation projects by 2020, most directly through the new Green Climate Fund (GCF). The People's Climate March will hopefully set some official pants on fire and speed up the capitalization of the new fund. At the same time, we need to be vigilant that the powers that be don't abuse the GCF as honey pots from which they can fund business-as-usual or outright destructive projects. Using large dams as an example, governments need to heed the following lessons of experience with climate finance as they commit new funding to the GCF: Take a holistic view of ecological threats: Large dams have helped turn freshwater ecosystems into the ecosystem type most threatened by species extinction. Tropical reservoirs are also a major source of greenhouse emissions in the ...
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Food Babe challenges companies on fast-food ingredients | In Person 22.9.2014 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
Food Babe is the nom de blog for Vani Hari, a 35-year-old banking consultant turned food activist, who has built a loyal online audience by calling out companies from Starbucks to Chick-fil-A for ingredients she deems harmful.
Food Babe challenges companies on fast-food ingredients | In Person 22.9.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
Food Babe is the nom de blog for Vani Hari, a 35-year-old banking consultant turned food activist, who has built a loyal online audience by calling out companies from Starbucks to Chick-fil-A for ingredients she deems harmful.
Jailed, Some Mentally Ill Inmates Land In Solitary Confinement 21.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Day or night, the lights inside cell 135C of central New Mexico's Valencia County Detention Center were always on. Locked inside, alone, for months, Jan Green — a 52-year-old computer technician with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder — rocked on a bench for hours, confiding in an imaginary companion. "I would talk and hold conversations just in my little crazy world, I guess you would say, just to keep me company," Green says. Though isolated, Green was, in a sense, far from alone. In jails around the country, inmates with serious mental illnesses are kept isolated in small cells for 23 hours a day or more, often with minimal treatment or human interaction. Some states have moved to curb long-term "solitary confinement" in prisons, where research shows it can drive those with mental illnesses further over the edge. But there has been little attention to the use of isolation in the country's 3,300 local jails, the biggest mental health facilities in many communities. Unlike prisons, jails hold those ...
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Existential Zombie 20.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Existential Zombie 20.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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