User: flenvcenter Topic: Education Arts and Culture-National
Category: Lifestyle and Psychology
Last updated: Mar 21 2017 19:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Parasitic Fish Offer Evolutionary Insights 21.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Lamprey are slimy, parasitic eel-like fish, one of only two existing species of vertebrates that have no jaw. While many would be repulsed by these creatures, lamprey are exciting to biologists because they are so primitive, retaining many characteristics similar to their ancient ancestors and thus offering answers to some of life's biggest evolutionary questions. Now, by studying the lamprey, Caltech researchers have discovered an unexpected mechanism for the evolution of the neurons of the peripheral nervous system—nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord.
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Thailand’s coin-eating turtle unconscious after 2nd surgery 21.3.2017 Washington Post: World
A Thai veterinarian says a 25-year-old sea turtle has slipped into a coma two weeks after it had life-saving surgery to remove 915 coins from its stomach.
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Wi-fi on rays of light: 100 times faster, and never overloaded 17.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Slow wi-fi is a source of irritation that nearly everyone experiences. Wireless devices in the home consume ever more data, and it’s only growing, and congesting the wi-fi network. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have come up with a surprising solution: a wireless network based on harmless infrared rays. The capacity is not only huge (more than 40Gbit/s per ray) but also there is no need to share since every device gets its own ray of light. This was the subject for which TU/e researcher Joanne Oh received her PhD degree with the ‘cum laude’ distinction last week.
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Measures of poverty and well-being still ignore the environment - this must change 16.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Orthodox economic measures like Gross Domestic product fail to measure the things that matter most, write Judith Schleicher & Bhaskar Vira: like human wellbeing and ecological health. This creates a systematic bias in 'development' policies that must urgently be addressed if we are to build an inclusive, equitable and sustainable societyWithout nature, humans could be neither healthy nor happy.
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Doubts about whether internet filters protect teenagers online 14.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Internet filters are widely used in homes, schools and libraries throughout the UK to protect young people from unpleasant online experiences. However, a new study by Oxford casts doubt on whether such technologies shield young teenagers after finding no link between homes with internet filters and the likelihood of the teenagers in those households being better protected. 
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Office Depot's Molly Ray on flipping the marketing script for sustainable products 11.3.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
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Diet and Global Climate Change 9.3.2017 Green Lifestyle and Sustainable Culture News - ENN
You are what you eat, as the saying goes, and while good dietary choices boost your own health, they also could improve the health care system and even benefit the planet. Healthier people mean not only less disease but also reduced greenhouse gas emissions from health care.As it turns out, some relatively small diet tweaks could add up to significant inroads in addressing climate change.
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Personal solutions can't save the planet 8.3.2017 TreeHugger
A short film called "Forget Short Showers" wants us to replace ethical shopping with fierce activism.
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Turning food waste into tires 7.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Tomorrow’s tires could come from the farm as much as the factory.Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered that food waste can partially replace the petroleum-based filler that has been used in manufacturing tires for more than a century.In tests, rubber made with the new fillers exceeds industrial standards for performance, which may ultimately open up new applications for rubber.
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John de Graaf: Buying less is more for social sustainability 3.3.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The "Affluenza" director discusses decoupling economic growth from consumption and reaching out across the political aisle.
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12 ideas for observing an eco-minded Lent 1.3.2017 TreeHugger
Use this 40-day period as a time to experiment and establish sustainable lifestyle habits.
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Yes, consumers can change public policies — sometimes. Here are the challenges. 27.2.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Trump boycotters shouldn't get their hopes up.
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The reasons for our left or right-handedness 17.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Unlike hitherto assumed, the cause is not to be found in the brain.It is not the brain that determines if people are right or left-handed, but the spinal cord. This has been inferred from the research results compiled by a team headed by private lecturer Dr Sebastian Ocklenburg, Judith Schmitz, and Prof Dr H. C. Onur Güntürkün. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and from South Africa, the biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have demonstrated that gene activity in the spinal cord is asymmetrical already in the womb. A preference for the left or the right hand might be traced back to that asymmetry.“These results fundamentally change our understanding of the cause of hemispheric asymmetries,” conclude the authors. The team report about their study in the journal “eLife”. 
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SFU technology puts 'touch' into long-distance relationships 14.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Long-distance couples can share a walk, watch movies together, and even give each other a massage, using new technologies being developed in Carman Neustaedter’s Simon Fraser University lab. 
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For SafeTrack Surge No. 12, the Blue Line takes a hiatus through the end of February 12.2.2017 Washington Post
For SafeTrack Surge No. 12, the Blue Line takes a hiatus through the end of February
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Harnessing The Power Of Nature To Improve Our Cities 11.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design / Island Press People feel happier, healthier, and more social when they engage with nature. Their cognitive abilities go up and stress levels go down. So why is nature so often thought to be found only "out there" in the wilderness, or perhaps suburbia? For Timothy Beatley, a professor at the University of Virginia, nature should be found everywhere, but especially in cities. Cities must remain dense and walkable, but they can be unique, memorable places only when they merge with nature. If well planned and designed, a city's forests, waterfronts, parks, gardens, and streets can make out-sized contributions to the health and well-being of everyone who lives there. In his latest excellent book, the Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design , Beatley brings together all the established science, the important case studies, the innovative code and design practices from around the world in one place. Even if you think you already know a lot about how best to ...
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Research suggests wearing police uniform changes the way brain processes information 10.2.2017 Environmental News Network
New research from a team of cognitive neuroscientists at McMaster suggests that simply putting on a uniform, similar to one the police might wear, automatically affects how we perceive others, creating a bias towards those considered to be of a low social status.
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Real-time feedback helps save energy and water 9.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Those who take long showers use a great deal of water and energy. Yet people who enjoy taking long showers do not usually realize to what extent they are damaging the environment. However, if a clever measuring system shows current consumption, this immediately leads to increased efficiency. The consumption information available on the display is incentive enough to reduce water and energy consumption when showering on average by 22 per cent. This was shown by a study conducted by the Universities of Bonn and Bamberg, as well as ETH Zurich. The results have initially been published online in the journal Management Science. The print edition will be published soon.
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New doubts on whether early humans were forced to start farming 7.2.2017 Environmental News Network
The development of agriculture is universally believed to underpin some of the most significant advances made by humans worldwide. In New Guinea, where one of the earliest human experiments with tropical forest agriculture occurred, researchers have cast doubt on two views about the origins of agriculture.
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Winter bicycle commuters ride for sustainability, economy and lifestyle 5.2.2017 Steamboat Pilot
In the pre-dawn light of a January morning in Steamboat, with the fat flakes falling straight down, the cyclists appear randomly like wraiths. But they’re really just committed commuters living a slice of the Steamboat lifestyle that appears to be growing with the emerging popularity of fat-tire bikes. You spot a single rider on the sidewalk that borders U.S. Highway 40 between downtown and the mountain, another on Yampa Street, and a third waiting at the stoplight at Ninth Street, waiting to ross busy Lincoln Avenue. Motorists bundled up in their heated cars and trucks feather the brakes, shake their heads in wonder and mumble, “What are they thinking about?” Ask winter bicycling commuters why they do what they do, and the answers begin with fitness and end with a commitment to leading a more sustainable lifestyle. In the big, wide middle of the trend are those who are infatuated with bicycles in all their variety. Who can resist studded bike tires? Dedicated cyclist Rich Levy says he’s been told ...
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