User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-National
Category: Policy
Last updated: Aug 27 2014 08:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 32,599    
Xcel defends handling of Monticello nuclear plant upgrade 27.8.2014 Star Tribune: Business
At issue is who pays:  investors or customers?
Also found in: [+]
A climate for change: The EPA’s limits on emissions are important but not enough 27.8.2014 Washington Post: Editorials
THE COUNTRY is about to see its fiercest climate-change battle. After years of congressional inaction, President Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency is applying new rules to curb greenhouse-gas emissions from cars, trucks and — most controversially — power plants, the biggest national emitters. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said he will try to restrict the EPA if Republicans take over the Senate. Mr. Obama’s executive actions will be an issue in the 2016 presidential ...
Also found in: [+]
Tell the Forest Service they have an obligation to protect your public groundwater resources 27.8.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Marcus Griswold, Water Resources Scientist, San Francisco: Recently, the US Forest Service released a “Directive” which would guide how groundwater is managed by the agency.  They are currently accepting comments from the public on that Directive and now is the time to weigh in to ensure public...
Also found in: [+]
How Cutting Emissions Pays Off 26.8.2014 Environmental News Network
Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions?
Also found in: [+]
UPDATED: Decorated War Veteran/Resident Arrested: Peabody Coal Overruns Rocky Branch, Despite Appeal Pending: Gov. Quinn and AG Madigan on Enviro Justice, Civil Rights? 26.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Rocky Branch, Illinois. Photo courtesy of Jeff Lucas, Gutting the Heartland. UPDATED: 10:30am CST Rocky Branch residents are reporting that decorated Vietnam War-veteran Glen Kellen, a Rocky Branch resident, has been arrested this morning, as he attempted to move his cross and protest sign closer to the public road. Shawnee Hills and Hollers posted this photo of the arrest to Facebook: Despite an appeal over the controversial Rocky Branch strip mine permit still pending with an Illinois Department of Natural Resources administrative judge, Peabody Energy defiantly crossed closed public roads and moved massive mining equipment in Saline County yesterday , in preparation to carry out its already violation-ridden and state-subsidized mine operation. Calling out clear violations of the state's mine permitting process, civil rights and environmental justice policies, besieged farm residents facing toxic mine blasting and water contamination within yards of their homes and wells have appealed to Gov. Pat ...
Also found in: [+]
Fixing Our Dysfunctional Government (Pt. I): Separation of Powers or Partisan Division? 26.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Congress is in recess, but as one wag said, making oblique reference to the reputation of the current Congress for its do-nothing nature, "How would you know?" Chicken and egg: do-nothing Congress? Under-performing executive? Given the multiple challenges facing our nation, abroad and at home, the indictment of congressional if not governmental inutility is a serious one. The causes of this nonperformance require study and no single change in procedure, rule, or even constitutional provision is probably enough to resolve or improve matters. But let us begin the examination. At the end of these series of columns, considering governmental reforms, I will advocate that the office of the vice president, which is presently without meaningful day to day role in our constitutional system, be tasked with undertaking the consideration of governmental reforms to make legislative and executive branch work more harmoniously and effectively. In making that recommendation, I have a personal interest in ...
Also found in: [+]
What it meant to be 'progressive' in turn-of-the-century Minnesota 26.8.2014 MinnPost
The growth of cities and industry in the late nineteenth century brought sweeping changes to American society. Minneapolis and Saint Paul grew rapidly. Urban labor provided new opportunities for Minnesotans as well as new challenges. Business practices and labor rights became topics of heated debate. The progressive movement spread amid growing concerns about the place of ordinary Americans in relation to the new urban landscape. Ignatius Donnelly 's novel Caesar's Column (1890) predicted a dystopian future ruled by business elites. He argued that greed and corruption would ultimately destroy democracy. The progressive movement was a reaction to these fears, as well as an expression of political idealism. The rise of  populism  in the 1870s strongly influenced progressive politics. The Financial Panic of 1873 caused farmers and workers to criticize corporate power and wealth inequality. Many Minnesotans joined groups like the  Farmers' Alliance  and  Knights of Labor  to influence public policy. ...
Also found in: [+]
Napa earthquake: Tech upgrades helped PG&E respond quickly 26.8.2014 SFGate: Business & Technology
[...] roughly 70,000 businesses and homes lost power following Sunday's early-morning earthquake near American Canyon. PG&E's sprawling networks for delivering electricity and natural gas appear to have suffered little lasting damage from the 6.0-magnitude quake, which struck at 3:20 a.m. Sunday. More than 400 phone calls poured in from customers who smelled natural gas, but only 20 buildings lost gas service, in each case as a result of structural damage. The deadly 2010 explosion of a PG&E pipeline beneath San Bruno forced PG&E to inspect its natural gas system and replace miles of transmission pipes and smaller distribution lines. Liquefaction beneath San Francisco's Marina district during the Loma Prieta quake snapped natural gas lines and triggered fires that consumed apartment buildings. Natural gas is suspected in one fire that followed Sunday's quake, a blaze that destroyed four mobile homes.
Also found in: [+]
Utility 2.0: NY’s New Business Model Should Properly Value the Costs and Benefits of Distributed Energy Resources 26.8.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Beia Spiller Source: AtisSun As we’ve mentioned before, New York is changing how it evaluates and compensates electric utilities. One goal of this change is increased consumer engagement, which makes customers allies in the development of a more reliable, resilient, and ‘smart’ electric grid. Many customers have begun taking advantage of new energy technologies and their falling prices by turning to community microgrids, installing on-site distributed generation, like rooftop solar, or investing in more efficient appliances, among other actions. Advances in telecommunications and information systems have also created new opportunities for energy services we could not have imagined just a few years ago. For example, innovative tools like demand response allow third parties or utilities to turn off pre-approved appliances – like swimming pool pumps and air conditioners – remotely when the power grid is stressed and needs a quick reduction in energy demand. To this end, more customers are adopting local, ...
Also found in: [+]
New Report Series: India's Burgeoning Solar and Wind Energy Markets Jumpstarting Job Growth 25.8.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Anjali Jaiswal, Senior Attorney, San Francisco: India’s solar and wind programs have catalyzed rapid growth, providing much needed energy access while creating enormous employment opportunities for India’s workforce, as discussed during the launch of a new series of reports on Renewable Energy Jobs and Finance in...
Also found in: [+]
Solar Could Grow Faster if We Had a Functioning Federal Government 25.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It is obvious that the United States federal government is struggling to perform basic governance functions and, as I wrote earlier this summer , it is incapable of leading the transition to a renewable economy. Nevertheless, one of the key elements of that transition, the adoption of solar power, is well underway in the U.S. According to a new report by John Rogers and Laura Wisland, published by the Union of Concerned Scientists : Solar is undergoing widespread and rapid growth in the United States... The amount of solar PV installed in the United States grew by 485 percent from 2010 to 2013...Solar accounted for an average of 16 percent of electricity capacity installed annually in the United States from 2011 to 2013, and almost 30 percent in 2013. They note that the price of solar systems has dropped by over 50% since 2007, and that as local government permitting processes become streamlined and as financing options grow, household solar installations are becoming more feasible. There are a variety ...
Also found in: [+]
In energy, which comes first: products or behavior change? 25.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Utilities are under pressure to get consumers to use less power. But how can we entice them to make permanent changes?

In energy, which comes first: products or behavior change?
Also found in: [+]
Huge solar farm proposed near Silicon Valley wins power contract, but loses major investor 25.8.2014 San Jose Mercury News: Breaking News
A solar project proposed for Panoche Valley in San Benito County secured a power purchase agreement with Southern California Edison, but it needs new financing after Duke Energy withdraws as financial backer.
Also found in: [+]
New University of Texas Chancellor's Military Background Is Cause for Reflection 24.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
How James Foley’s Death Changed the Course of Obama’s Foreign Policy 24.8.2014 Terrorism
Colin Powell is an American hero.  He served two combat tours in Vietnam, and rose to become the first African-American Secretary of State, National Security Advisor, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  But the doctrine that bears his name – the Powell Doctrine – is a disaster. The Powell Doctrine is somewhat of a misnomer: it’s actually mostly the Weinberger Doctrine, articulated by President Reagan’s former Secretary of Defense and refined by Powell afterwards.  It says that American military power should not be used except overwhelmingly and as a last resort, with a clear political objective and exit strategy in ...
Also found in: [+]
Cause of New Mexico nuclear waste accident remains a mystery 24.8.2014 LA Times: Environment
A 55-gallon drum of nuclear waste, buried in a salt shaft 2,150 feet under the New Mexico desert, violently erupted late on Feb. 14 and spewed mounds of radioactive white foam.
Also found in: [+]
Let's make a deal: How Colorado came to a fracking compromise 24.8.2014 Denver Post: News: Local
On the second day of his vacation, surrounded by science fiction and comic book fans at Comic Con, Alan Salazar looked around the San Diego Convention Center for a quiet place so he could take a phone call from his boss. It was July 25, and Gov. John Hickenlooper wanted to talk to his trusted staffer about yet another compromise attempt on fracking measures headed to the November ...
Also found in: [+]
EPA Expanding Crime Division As North Dakota's Oil Sector Booms 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency's law enforcement arm has opened an office in Bismarck so that it will have a bigger presence in the North Dakota's booming oil patch. Jeffry Martinez, the special agent in charge of the EPA's Denver-based Criminal Investigation Division, said the new office opened at the end of July but isn't permanently staffed yet. "This is a first step and I'm hopeful that it will lead over time to a fulltime presence," said U.S. Attorney Tim Purdon. The Criminal Investigation Division is made up of 200 federal agents who are tasked with upholding environmental law. "Environmental crimes involve lying, cheating and stealing like any other crime," said Maritnez. "We try to pick the worst of the worst." In less than a decade, North Dakota's oil production has gone up tenfold, to over 1 million barrels of oil a day. The proliferation of oil infrastructure — more than 11,000 wells, along with pipelines, waste disposal sites and drilling rigs — has increased the ...
Also found in: [+]
Ferguson and the Case for Creating a Special Prosecutor's Office for the Police 23.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The recent shooting, of yet another unarmed young black male, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, MO - by a white police officer - makes it abundantly clear that there is a need for a legislatively created Special Prosecutor's Office for the Police. This office should be created not only in the State of Missouri but in every state across the nation. To my knowledge, no such office currently exists anywhere in the United States. However, with police misconduct being so prevalent and increasingly more pervasive and given that it ruptures the very fabric of our society, there is a need for a Special Prosecutor's Office for the Police in each of our 50 states. The time has come to stop talking about the need for special prosecutors in a specific case. The time is upon us to actually do something about it. This should no longer be, as it always has been in the past, just another abstract discussion. Teddy Roosevelt once admonished the nation that just having discussions about problems and solutions in the abstract ...
Also found in: [+]
State energy director praises local mineral rights advocacy group 23.8.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Jody Camilletti, of Hayden, confirmed Friday that she is among the 200 people who have submitted letters of application for 18 remaining seats on Gov. John Hickenlooper’s new task force on energy development issues. Camilletti was present at Saddleback Ranch near Milner on Thursday night when Matt Lepore, director of the Colorado Oil and Gas Commission, which regulates those industries in the state, said it is likely to take another two weeks before selections for the task force are final. “The governor recognizes how important it is for this task force to work well together and has taken direct interest in naming these people,” Lepore told an audience of about 100, who were invited to a barbecue by Citizens Supporting Property Rights. Camilletti said her motivations for seeking a spot on the task force are similar to those that led to a role in the creation of CSPR, which advocates for the interests of people who own subsurface mineral rights. “We feel like the stakeholders need a voice so that it’s not ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 32,599