User: flenvcenter Topic: Energy-National
Category: Policy
2 new since Feb 23 2017 19:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Paul Waldman: Republicans suddenly realize burning down the health-care system might not be a great idea 23.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The Republican effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act is not going well, in large part because it turns out that making sweeping changes to a system that encompasses one-sixth of the American economy turns out to be rather more complicated than they imagined. Their backtracking has an interesting character to it, in particular how they’ve been gobsmacked by the transition from shaking their fists at the system to being responsible for it. Up until November, they had been pursuing a strategy th... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Can rising seas yield common ground with Trump? 23.2.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Exploring opportunities for climate collaboration with the Trump administration
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Decoding the Doublespeak of FCC Chairman Pai 23.2.2017 American Prospect
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images FCC commissioner Ajit V. Pai testifies during the House Energy and Commerce Committee Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing on oversight of the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday July 10, 2012.  Michael Flynn, Kellyanne Conway, and Stephen Miller aren’t the only Donald Trump surrogates who’ve had a very bad couple of weeks. Ajit Pai, the president’s pick to lead the Federal Communications Commission, was pilloried by The  New York Times  and  Washington Post  editorial boards last week after his agency released  a rapid-fire series of rulings  in a move that resembled Trump’s  rush of executive orders . Chairman Pai’s directives, which he issued with zero public input, undermine the open internet and undercut the agency’s Lifeline program, which is designed to make the internet more affordable for families with low incomes.    Pai’s attack on Lifeline drew a swift response.  A series of letters  from  dozens of Democrats on Capitol Hill ...
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Emails show new EPA chief’s cozy ties with fuel industry 23.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — When a summer thunderstorm knocked out power to Scott Pruitt’s home three years ago, the then-attorney general of Oklahoma reached out to a lobbyist for American Electric Power. Pruitt’s executive assistant emailed Howard “Bud” Ground, saying “General Pruitt” wanted to know when his lights would be back on. The utility lobbyist asked […]
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Trump's First 100 Days: It's Trump's GOP. But there's resistance. 23.2.2017 Washington Post
Trump's First 100 Days: It's Trump's GOP. But there's resistance.
Key Moments In The Dakota Access Pipeline Fight 23.2.2017 NPR News
An overview of multiple legal challenges and protests since the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers considered approving a section of the pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.
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Thousands of Scott Pruitt's Emails Just Hit the Internet. Here Are the Wildest, Scariest Bits. 23.2.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by t he Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The close relationship between Scott Pruitt, the new administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and fossil fuel interests including the billionaire Koch brothers has been highlighted in more than 7,500 emails and other records released by the Oklahoma attorney general's office on Wednesday. The documents show that Pruitt, while Oklahoma attorney general, acted in close concert with oil and gas companies to challenge environmental regulations, even putting his letterhead to a complaint filed by one firm, Devon Energy. This practice was first revealed in 2014, but it now appears that it occurred more than once. The emails also show that American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, an oil and gas lobby group, provided Pruitt's office with template language to oppose ozone limits and the renewable fuel standard program in 2013. AFPM encouraged Oklahoma to challenge the rules, ...
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Republicans suddenly realize burning down the health-care system might not be a great idea 23.2.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Republicans suddenly realize burning down the health-care system might not be a great idea
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‘Politics of Demonization’ Breeding Division and Fear 22.2.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Amnesty International releases its Annual Report for 2016 to 2017 Risk of domino effect as powerful states backtrack on human rights commitments Salil Shetty, head of the global movement, warns that “never again” has become meaningless as states fail to react to mass atrocities Politicians wielding a toxic, dehumanizing “us vs them” rhetoric are creating a more divided and dangerous world, warned Amnesty International today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the ...
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The President of Iceland is right: Ban pineapple pizza. 22.2.2017 TreeHugger
This is a silly post, about a silly bit of news, but is a reminder that we really should think about what we eat.
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Red State Rural America Is Acting On Climate Change – Without Calling It Climate Change 22.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Rebecca J. Romsdahl , University of North Dakota President Donald Trump has the environmental community understandably concerned . He and members of his Cabinet have questioned the established science of climate change , and his choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency, former Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, has sued the EPA many times and regularly sided with the fossil fuel industry . Even if the Trump administration withdraws from all international climate negotiations and reduces the EPA to bare bones , the effects of climate change are happening and will continue to build . In response to real threats and public demand, cities across the United States and around the world are taking action to address climate change. We might think this is happening only in large, coastal cities that are threatened by sea-level rise or hurricanes, like Amsterdam or New York. Research shows, however, that even in the fly-over red states of the U.S. Great Plains, local leaders in small- to ...
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5 Issues to Watch as India Reaches for Ambitious Energy Access Target 22.2.2017 WRI Stories
5 Issues to Watch as India Reaches for Ambitious Energy Access TargetAdd Comment|PrintThere’s renewed optimism that India can electrify every one of its households. Photo by DIVatUSAID/Flickr India’s electricity access challenge is formidable. About 300 million people lack electricity, while an additional 100 million have less than 4 hours of electricity per day, and possibly several million more suffer from unreliable supply. Population growth and an increase in electricity demand each year... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
"We Will Never Stop": An EPA Employee Blasts the Trump Administration 22.2.2017 Mother Jones
As we embark on month two of Donald Trump's presidency, it's hard to imagine a group of federal employees facing more uncertainty than the staff of the Environmental Protection Agency. Industry ally and new EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt can be viewed only as an agent of profound change, and he's already faced intense opposition from Senate Democrats and from the staff he inherits . In recent days, both Bloomberg and the Washington Post have reported that the first moves Trump and Pruitt will make in their overhaul of US environmental policy will be to roll back parts of Barack Obama's climate legacy and the "Waters of the US" rule—a thorn in the side of farmers and ranchers. This comes as no surprise—both of these policies were identified at the top of the administration's "America First Energy Plan" agenda the moment the White House website switched over on inauguration day . After his hostile nomination process, Pruitt made an appeal to civility Tuesday in his first address to EPA staff . "We as an ...
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A Day Without Immigrants: Last Week's Protests Were a Foretaste of Strikes to Come, Organizers Say 22.2.2017 Truthout - All Articles
When Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke signed on to Trump's program of mass deportations, immigrant workers in Wisconsin swung into action and planned a general strike. In this interview, Farmworker German Sanchez and Voces de la Frontera Executive Director Christine Neumann-Ortiz discuss last week's strikes and plans for future actions. Demonstrators take part in the Day Without Latinos, Immigrants and Refugees march in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on February 13, 2017. (Photo: Sue Ruggles) Since election night 2016, the streets of the US have rung with resistance. People all over the country have woken up with the conviction that they must do something to fight inequality in all its forms. But many are wondering what it is they can do. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, experienced organizers, troublemakers and thinkers share their insights on what works, what doesn't, what has changed, and what is still the same. Today's interview is the fourteenth in the series. Click here for the most recent ...
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7,500 pages of emails reveal Scott Pruitt’s close ties with oil, gas industry 22.2.2017 Washington Post
The release comes days after the former Oklahoma attorney general was sworn in as head of the Environmental Protection Agency.
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Trump pick as security adviser is independent-minded 22.2.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s choice of an outspoken but non-political Army general as national security adviser is a nod to pragmatism, but Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will serve a commander in chief with unorthodox ideas about foreign policy and an inner circle of advisers determined to implement them. McMaster, 54, is an independent-minded […]
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Scott Pruitt Goes After Critics, EPA In His First Speech To The Agency 22.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt mentioned a “toxic environment” just once during his first address Tuesday to the embattled agency staff. But he wasn’t talking about industry pollution or conserving nature. He was referring to his critics’ political rhetoric. “Forgive the reference, but it’s a very toxic environment,” the controversial new administrator said in the speech, which lasted under 20 minutes.   “Civility is something I believe in very much,” he added. “We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some issues in a civil manner.” Then, at last, he began to outline his vision for the EPA. He described an agency that prioritized making it easier for polluters to comply with regulations. He promised to listen intently to companies before saddling them with new regulations. He admonished his new employees, some fearing layoffs amid looming budget cuts, for acting outside the agency’s legal mandate and running roughshod over states’ rights. “Regulations ought to make ...
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How We Got Here: The Misuse of American Military Power and The Middle East in Chaos 22.2.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Danny Sjursen

The United States has already lost -- its war for the Middle East, that is. Having taken my own crack at combat soldiering in both Iraq and Afghanistan, that couldn’t be clearer to me. Unfortunately, it’s evidently still not clear in Washington. Bush’s neo-imperial triumphalism failed. Obama’s quiet shift to drones, Special Forces, and clandestine executive actions didn’t turn the tide either.

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D.C. Circuit concludes Recovery Act bars judicial review of suits against FHFA over treatment of Fannie and Freddie shareholders 22.2.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
D.C. Circuit concludes Recovery Act bars judicial review of suits against FHFA over treatment of Fannie and Freddie shareholders
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Trump pick as security adviser is nod toward pragmatism 22.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s choice of an outspoken but non-political Army general as national security adviser is a nod to pragmatism, but Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will serve a commander in chief with unorthodox ideas about foreign policy and an inner circle of advisers determined to implement them. McMaster, 54, is an independent-minded […]
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