User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Nov 01 2014 03:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Economy Is Still The Biggest Issue For The Voters 1.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- For all the talk about ISIS and Ebola, and all the political firestorms over the Affordable Care Act, most voters this year remain focused on the economy. In a new HuffPost/YouGov poll of likely voters , 56 percent named the economy as one of the two issues most important to them. Health care, named by 35 percent, was a clear but relatively distant second choice, followed by immigration, "how things work in Washington" and foreign policy/terrorism. Three more topics -- social/women's issues, the environment and gun policies -- barely broke into the double digits. Priorities diverged sharply between those supporting a Democratic candidate for Congress and those backing a Republican. While both groups overwhelmingly named the economy as a top issue, the Republican voters picked immigration and foreign policy as the second and third most important issues, with health care in fourth place. The Democratic voters, in contrast, rated health care nearly as important as the economy, with how things ...
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Bear Creek mystery: Water testers seek source of E.coli contamination 1.11.2014 Denver Post: Local
Twice a month, Metropolitan State University student biologists David Watson and Stephen Aderholdt have been slogging through contaminated Bear Creek testing the water, at work on a mystery ...
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TTIP: How the world's largest trade deal affects you 31.10.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
The huge US-European deal will have a major impact on health and the environment. New Scientist explains what it is – and what it means for ordinary ...
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Another Fracking Health Threat 31.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You may have been shocked by this recent headline : "Dead babies near oil drilling sites raise questions for researchers." But those who are following the national debate about fracking are all too familiar with the concerns community members have about pollution from this new drilling technology. In fact, our report on health risks to infants, children and pregnant women living near fracking operations found serious reasons for concern. As the CEH report notes, chemicals used in fracking and/or created by fracking operations have been linked to low birth weight, birth defects, respiratory problems, infertility and cancer, among other serious problems. There has been much attention to water pollution risks from fracking, but there has been less research into air quality around fracking sites. Now a new study , co-authored by CEH's Research Director Caroline Cox and published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health shines light on fracking air pollution risks. Along with the study, a report, ...
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US Trade Agreement with Asia-Pacific Countries Must Have Strong Environmental Provisions 30.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The U.S. and eleven other countries are in the final stages of a trade agreement - the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) - that would, if completed, be the biggest trade agreement in recent history. It would cover countries accounting for over forty percent of the world's trade and economic output. It will have far reaching implications for public health, environmental and conservation protection in the U.S. and around the world. If it is to truly reflect a "21st Century Trade Agreement" as President Obama has outlined, it will need to include meaningful, binding, and enforceable environmental provisions and not include back-door mechanisms that undercut bedrock protections for people's health and the planet. That was the message in a letter that leading environmental and conservation groups just sent to the U.S. This trade agreement is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, U.S., and Vietnam. These countries are major ...
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A New Flank in China's War on Pollution? Controlling Emissions from Ports and Shipping 30.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As President Obama and other Asia-Pacific leaders gather in Beijing for the upcoming Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit , climate change and air pollution will undoubtedly be on the agenda. This summit therefore provides an important opportunity for these leaders to address one of the most significant -and largely unregulated -- sources of toxic air pollutants and black carbon emissions in Asia: its ports and shipping system. Asia is home to nine of the ten busiest and most densely populated container ports in the world - seven of them in China. As detailed in NRDC's new report, The Prevention and Control of Shipping and Port Air Emissions in China , container ships loading their cargo in China and elsewhere in Asia are free to run on dirty bunker fuel, a waste product of traditional fuel oil processing containing a number of pollutants that are known to cause cancer, respiratory illness and premature death, as well as exacerbate climate change and damage the oceans. The sulfur levels in marine ...
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Pennsylvania congressman launches frack waste investigation 30.10.2014 Philly.com News
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EPA’s Ongoing Outreach Shows Commitment to Strong Power Plant Carbon Pollution Limits 29.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Using Microscopic Bugs to Save the Bees 28.10.2014 Environmental News Network
For decades, honeybees have been battling a deadly disease that kills off their babies (larvae) and leads to hive collapse. It’s called American Foulbrood and its effects are so devastating and infectious, it often requires infected hives to be burned to the ground. Treating Foulbrood is complicated because the disease can evolve to resist antibiotics and other chemical treatments. Losing entire hives not only disrupts the honey industry, but reduces the number of bees for pollinating plants. Now an undergraduate student at BYU, funded by ORCA grants, has produced a natural way to eliminate the scourge, and it’s working: Using tiny killer bugs known as phages to protect baby bees from infection.
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In the Shadow of Oil Refineries, We Must Protect Texans’ Health 28.10.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Marcelo Norsworthy Source: flickr.com/podruzny/ Big Oil casts a long shadow along the Texas Gulf Coast: its toxic emissions of cancer-causing compounds leave overburdened communities facing serious health concerns, even as the industry resists implementing commonsense, protective policies. The shadow, however, need not be so dark for much longer. Currently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to strengthen long-overdue emissions standards for petroleum refineries, which is a critical step toward securing healthier air quality for millions of Americans. Refineries are a major source of a “toxic soup” of extremely harmful air pollutants including neurotoxins, hazardous metals, and cancer-causing pollutants. Exposure to these compounds can cause lung disease, skin disorders, headaches, and immune system ailment, as well as increase the risk of cancer. Refineries nationwide reported about 22,000 tons of hazardous air pollution in 2010, and many of the largest polluters are right ...
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Farm salt poisoning costs $27 billion annually 28.10.2014 New Scientist: Focus on America
Salt is poisoning 2000 hectares of farmland daily, cutting crop yields in some areas by as much as 70 per ...
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Dow Chemical and Monsanto Are At It Again as EPA and USDA Approve "Agent Orange" Crops 28.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a long overdue effort, the U.S. is currently spending millions of dollars to help the Vietnamese clean up the tragic legacy of our use of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. The effort to remove the remaining contamination caused by the toxic mix of herbicides is expected to be completed in the next few years. Agent Orange was primarily manufactured by Dow Chemical and Monsanto, and these two companies are at it again. This time, they've teamed up to unleash a mixture of their chemical herbicides on the American farmland. The Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently gave Dow Chemical approval to manufacture and sell next generation, genetically engineered (GE) corn and soy that can withstand massive dosing of the herbicide 2,4-D. The gene altered crops are also resistant to Monsanto's glyphosate herbicide, Roundup. The new combined GE crop systems are given the appropriately military name "Enlist Duo." We know what the coupling of Dow and Monsanto did to ...
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New Drayage Trucks – at Half the Price (and the Pollution)? It’s True! 28.10.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Source: flickr.com/photos/truckpr By: Christina Wolfe, EDF's Ports & Transportation Analyst  Calling all heavy-duty truck owners who work at the Port of Houston! Cold, hard cash is available for the purchase of new trucks that are more fuel-efficient and cleaner-burning, providing up to 80 percent of the cost of a new truck. The Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) will be hosting a Drayage Truck Event at the Port of Houston on Saturday, November 1, from 10:00am to 1:30pm, to share information about available grants and loans in order to help owners replace older, dirtier vehicles with new, cleaner ones (see how others have taken advantage of these opportunities in the past). Why is funding like this available to help someone pay for a new truck? By replacing an older truck with a new one, we all benefit from improved air quality. These benefits include: better health , since cleaner air reduces the onset of asthma and cancer and helps avoid the loss of work and schooldays, and economic advancement, as ...
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When it comes to food packaging, what we don't know could hurt us 27.10.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Recent analyses raise disturbing questions about the health and environmental effects of the stuff that encases our edibles.

When it comes to food packaging, what we don't know could hurt us
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In Florida, a water-pollution warning that glows at night 27.10.2014 Washington Post
COCOA, Fla. — Karen McLaughlin normally carries a flashlight for her nighttime kayak trips along Florida’s Banana River to spot any alligators resting on the banks. But these days, it’s the river itself that glows in the ...
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Indigenous Communities Take Chevron to Global Court for 'Crimes Against Humanity' 26.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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GreenSpace: Unvented gas stoves are an asthma risk 26.10.2014 P-com Living Green
When most people think of air pollution, they think of outdoors - smokestacks and tailpipes. So they may overlook a significant source indoors - the household gas stove, which is gaining new notoriety as an air polluter these days.
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Dead babies near oil drilling sites raise questions for researchers 26.10.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
The smartphone-sized grave marker is nearly hidden in the grass at Rock Point Cemetery. The name printed on plastic-coated paper — Beau Murphy — has been worn away.
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Our Planet's Primal Scream -- Is Anyone Listening? 25.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Recent headlines have sounded the alarm on the mounting impacts of climate change. Over the past few months, we have seen everything from the hottest summer on record, to historic droughts and extreme wildfires ravaging communities in California, to vanishing wildlife habitat in Alaska, to toxic algae blooming out of control and contaminating drinking water supplies in America's heartland. How much more do we need to know about the devastating effects of climate change before Congress takes action? In California, the first six months of 2014 were the hottest on record, and 82 percent of the state is currently experiencing extreme drought. And the situation is expected to get worse -- recently scientists predicted that 2014 will end as the hottest year ever recorded. Experts also tell us that climate change has tripled the probability that the drought-causing weather conditions will continue. This historic drought is contributing to more frequent and intense wildfires. In the past, California's ...
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I can't hear you: Noise pollution is a health threat near unconventional oil and gas sites 24.10.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Tanja Srebotnjak, Public Health Research Fellow, San Francisco: The concerns about air and water pollution resulting from the explosive growth in unconventional oil and gas development using hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) and other controversial stimulation methods have received a lot of attention recently. Increased oil and gas production using...
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