User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Mar 01 2015 14:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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GreenSpace: Phila. storm-water plan seen to have wider positives 1.3.2015 P-com Living Green
Sure, newly planted shrubs and trees can soak up storm water that otherwise would have overwhelmed the sewage system. Now there is early evidence that they may improve health and safety as well.
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Colorado land impact of oil and gas boom: scars spread and stay 1.3.2015 Denver Post: Local
Oil and gas companies have yet to fully restore land around half of the 47,505 inactive wells in Colorado, and 72 percent of those un-restored sites have been in the process for more than ...
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Our View: Sweeping streets is more than cosmetic 1.3.2015 Steamboat Pilot
We can empathize with downtown residents who are losing sleep over the noise made by the city of Steamboat Springs’ pre-dawn street-sweeping operations this winter. However, we believe City Council’s plans to exempt street sweeping from the city noise ordinance, as it has already for emergency vehicles and snow plows, is a necessary step. At Issue The noise made by city street sweepers in the wee hours. Our View Sweeping city streets is essential to keeping Steamboat on the healthy side of air pollution regs. In fact, we are aware that city officials are obligated, under the terms of agreements with both the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency, to sweep the streets once they have dried following snow events. That effort is made to reduce a kind of air pollution referred to as “PM-10.” The abbreviation refers to tiny particulates suspended in the air that measure 10-microns or less – roughly the diameter of a human hair. Routt County ...
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Here's How NYC Says It's Saving 800 Lives A Year By Cleaning Up The Air 28.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It’s been a cold winter in New York City , which means a lot of building owners are turning up the heat -- and pumping more pollutants into the city’s air. But the amount of black smoke billowing above the five boroughs is dramatically less than it was just four years ago. Since 2011, according to city figures, soot pollution in the city's air has plummeted by 50 percent , which amounts to 375 tons of airborne soot that isn’t lodging itself inside the lungs of New Yorkers, or helping to hasten the effects of climate change. It’s an improvement, according to the city's health department , that is preventing 800 deaths a year, as well as 2,000 emergency room visits and hospitalizations due to lung and cardiovascular diseases. And it’s thanks, in large part, to a program called New York City Clean Heat . Launched in 2011 under former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the program set its sights on two culprits behind much of the city’s air pollution: No. 6 oil and No. 4 oil. From left to right, vials of Ultra-Low ...
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California moves forward to limit toxic perchlorate contamination - EPA still overdue 27.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Jennifer Sass, Senior Scientist, Washington, D.C.: California is taking a big leap forward on the path to making the tap water of its residents safer than ever by setting a new public health goal (PHG) for perchlorate - a toxic water contaminant - of 1 part...
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Dems stop bill seeking oversight of Colorado health exchange bonuses 27.2.2015 Denver Post: News: Local
The House Health, Insurance and Environment Committee Thursday killed a Senate bill that would have required legislative approval of any pay bonus given to employees of the state health insurance ...
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The Right to Breathe Easy 27.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I have written before about air quality as an issue for community-centered deliberation and action, and as a place where technology fluency can change the world. Air quality is never far from recent news tropes; but the past month we have witnessed an explosion in coverage, and for good reason. Studies have found new correlations between bad air, ADHD and autism . Add that to well-known epidemiological links to cardiovascular disease and, of course, asthma . The amount of air quality suffering globally is truly staggering; and now comes the newest report : more than half of all residents of India live in such polluted air that more than three years is shaved off their lifespan. That's 2.1 billion life-years lost, and that is just India, never mind China, Indonesia and countless other countries. My own beloved Pittsburgh suffers through 230 days of bad air every year, and even San Francisco, blessed by ocean winds, witnessed terrible air quality for nearly two weeks just last month. No doubt: air ...
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Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies 26.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Streams within approximately 40% of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University. According to the publication, particularly streams in the Mediterranean, the USA, Central America and Southeast Asia are at risk.
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Food fight looks likely as nutrition panel urges attention to environmental impact 26.2.2015 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Dan Domme What if nutrition guidelines indicated food's impact on the environment, not just its impact on your waistline? Should the nation’s official nutrition guidelines address the environmental impact of American eating habits along with personal-health concerns? Absolutely, in the view of a federal advisory board that has assembled a scientific foundation for the guidelines’ next revision , due later this year. As you probably have heard, the panel suggested last week that the guidelines drop their longstanding warning about cholesterol intake, especially from eggs, while reassuring us that moderate coffee and alcohol use probably shouldn’t be a concern. That's the natural stuff of news briefs. But the truly new – and highly controversial – substance of its recommendations lies at the intersection of public and environmental health. For example, in suggesting that Americans eat less meat, and particularly less red meat, while moving toward more plant-based diet plans, the panel ...
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First 50 Days: Nothing but the Big Polluter Agenda 26.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Around the time the new Congress marked its first 50 days, my children's classes were celebrating the 100th day of school. Students did a hundred math problems, read books for a hundred minutes, and brought in bags of a hundred objects like dried beans and pasta. If Republicans in Congress marked their milestone in a similar way, they would probably write up 50 ways to gut environmental safeguards or haul in 50 miniature smokestacks. And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would be at the top of the class. Fifty days into the new Congress, McConnell has established himself as a champion of polluting industries. McConnell devoted much of this session to supporting the Keystone XL pipeline for dirty tar sands oil and trying to block the EPA from reducing climate change emissions. These efforts get a failing grade from public health experts because they would increase pollution linked to asthma attacks, respiratory illness and cancer. Why has the GOP leadership used the first 50 days to push pollution? ...
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Celebrating Black Leadership on the Environment 26.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Adrianna Quintero, Senior Attorney, Director, Latino Outreach, San Francisco: Black History Month calls for a celebration of the visionary environmental leadership of Black individuals and communities, as well as an examination of the many environmental injustices faced by people of color in our country. Whether we acknowledge it or...
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Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives 25.2.2015 NPR Health Science
India's air pollution is so bad that it shortens many people's lives by about three years, a study found. This week Al Gore visited New Delhi to link bad air to climate change.
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Celebrating Black Leadership on the Environment 25.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Black History Month calls for a celebration of the visionary environmental leadership of black individuals and communities, as well as an examination of the many environmental injustices faced by people of color in our country. Whether we acknowledge it or not, the extreme weather events of last year and early 2015 do not visit economic, psychological and health-related damage upon all Americans equally. We have seen for decades how racism, poverty and other forms of marginalization negatively impact our experience of environmental issues such as pollution and extreme weather. When a superstorm like Hurricane Sandy hits, it does its worst damage to families who lack access to health insurance, rent homes, are un- or under-insured, and generally already overburdened. From winter storms that bring higher heating costs and disrupted services, to summer heat waves that are felt more harshly in urban centers where, research shows, 52% of black Americans are more likely than whites to live in "urban heat ...
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Indians lose billions of life years to air pollution 25.2.2015 New Scientist: Living World
Over half of India's population lives in areas with dangerous levels of air pollution. Now that has been translated into years of life lost ...
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Beacon Hill Study: Bizarre algebra, crazy assumptions, and the wrong policy 25.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Laurie Johnson, Chief Economist, Climate and Clean Air Program, Washington, DC: On behalf of the fossil fuel industry, the Beacon Hill Institute (BHI) just rolled out a national study, accompanied by a suite of 16 state analyses, claiming economic calamity will result from first-ever proposed limits on carbon pollution. The limits,...
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How to Appreciate Progress? Go Take a Hike. 25.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When I was growing up in Azusa (whose motto was "From A to Z in the USA") back in the early 1960s, we relished the rare days after a winter rainstorm. On those days we could go outside and see snow-covered peaks in the San Gabriel Mountains, soaring 10,000 feet overhead. And while these mountains were only a few miles from my home as the crow flies, it was rare to actually be able to see them. The air pollution was so bad back then we had " red flag days " when school children weren't allowed to play outside during recess because of dangerous levels of air pollution. It was 45 years ago that the Clean Air Act passed and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created, and they have both made a tremendous difference in our quality of life. The EPA estimates that without the Clean Air Act, by 1990 "an additional 205,000 Americans would have died prematurely and millions more would have suffered illnesses ranging from mild respiratory symptoms to heart disease, chronic bronchitis, asthma attacks, ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Protect People, Wildlife From Toxic Soot Pollution 24.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Preventing Sea Level Rise in New York City While Cleaning the Air in India and China 23.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week, the New York City Panel on Climate Change predicted a hot and stormy future for the city that never sleeps. Apparently, by the end of the century New Yorkers will have ample reason to lose sleep. I view these projections as possible yet avoidable scenarios. New York City is spending $20 billion to help ensure it can adapt to a more difficult future, but if the panel's prediction of two feet of sea level rise comes to pass, we will need many multiples of $20 billion to protect New York. These projections should be seen as probabilistic warnings, not certain predictions of the future. There is little question that we must adapt to a changing climate, but we still have the ability to mitigate climate change and reduce the impacts of humans on the planet's ecological and climate systems. Some of the change will need to come in the developed world, as we transition to a fossil fuel-free economy. But much of the change will need to come in the developing world as they hopefully leapfrog over our ...
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WorldViews: Map: These will be Europe’s most polluted cities by 2030 23.2.2015 Washington Post: World
When Europeans talk about air pollution, they often think of India or China, but rarely consider their own continent to be at risk. And while levels of air pollution have decreased throughout Europe over the past decades, a new study by Austrian scientists concludes that smog is far from being defeated on the continent.Read full article ...
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Parks Service Surveys The Environment's Accoustical Health 22.2.2015 NPR Health Science
The National Park Service has been measuring sounds in nature for a decade. But not all sounds are natural. NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with Kurt Fristrup, who's behind the bio-acoustical project.
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