User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Apr 16 2014 10:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 9,701    
Here's What Fracking Can Do To Your Health 16.4.2014 Mother Jones
If you know one thing about fracking, it might be that the wells have been linked to explosive tap water. Of course, a tendency toward combustion isn't the biggest problem with gas-infused water; it's what could happen to you when you drink it. Although the natural gas industry is notoriously tight-lipped about the ingredients of the chemical cocktails that get pumped down into wells, by now it's widely known that the list often includes some pretty scary, dangerous stuff , including hydrochloric acid and ethylene glycol (a.k.a. antifreeze). It's also no secret that well sites release hazardous gases like methane and benzene (a carcinogen) into the atmosphere. So just how dangerous are fracking and other natural gas extraction processes for your health (not counting, for the sake of argument, explosions and earthquakes )? Is it true, as an activist-art campaign by Yoko Ono recently posited, that "fracking kills"? The answer to that second question is probably not, especially in the short term and if you ...
Also found in: [+]
Study: Pollution greater in minority neighborhoods 16.4.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The University of Minnesota study found that on average, minority populations are exposed to nitrogen dioxide levels that are 38 percent higher than levels of the gas found in predominantly white neighborhoods.
Also found in: [+]
U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Historic EPA Protections to Limit Mercury and Toxic Air Pollution from Power Plants 15.4.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Historic EPA Protections to Limit Mercury and Toxic Air Pollution from Power Plants
Also found in: [+]
Toxic mercury pollution limits survive major court challenge 15.4.2014 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
Some environmental threats are hard to explain. Toxic mercury is not. A dangerous neurotoxin that threatens young children, developing babies, and others, almost everyone reacts viscerally at the idea of ingesting it. And the scientific evidence endorses that instinctive response. That’s why today’s decision by a federal court to uphold the EPA’s Mercury and Air […]
Also found in: [+]
Drama helps kids with autism communicate better 15.4.2014 New Scientist: Living World
Improvised drama sessions may help develop communication, interaction, and imagination skills – the "triad of impairments" seen in ...
Also found in: [+]
The intersection of public health and transport in Indian cities 15.4.2014 THE CITY FIX
Typical transport investment and policy proposals in India often consider few factors, some being connectivity with surrounding areas, land use and socioeconomic impacts, available funding, and the level of support from local stakeholders. All too often, these assessments consistently overlook ...
Also found in: [+]
Minnesota and mining: Our children, our waters and wild rice are political pawns 15.4.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Brett Whaley This is Minnesota’s watershed moment, literally and figuratively. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) announcement came just two weeks before public comments were due for PolyMet’s Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement. PolyMet ’s proposed NorthMet Mine is the first in a long line of sulfide mining projects aimed at turning Minnesota’s Superior National Forest, the lake country of the Arrowhead, into a sulfide-mining district — a district that would impact both the Lake Superior and Rainy River watersheds, arguably in perpetuity. The announcement? The MPCA had decided overnight not to release its recommendation to maintain or to change the 10mg/L sulfate standard for wild rice waters. Results from the MPCA wild rice study , released earlier, looked promising that the sulfate standard would be upheld. The timing of the agency’s postponement was too coincidental, too sudden, and it just plain reeked. Now we know the stench was real. Investigative digging by the ...
Also found in: [+]
Southland air regulators seek to hold ports to pollution targets 15.4.2014 LA Times: Environment
Under proposed rule, if the L.A. and Long Beach ports fail to hit targets the air district would require them to propose additional pollution reduction measures.

Air quality regulators, embarking on a bold new strategy to reduce smog in Southern California, want to hold the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach responsible for their pledges to cut pollution from thousands of trucks, ships and trains carrying goods to and from the nation's largest port complex.
Also found in: [+]
Study: Green Tea Boosts Working Memory 15.4.2014 Forbes.com: News
If green tea were a celebrity, it would already be tippy top of the A-list. Its active ingredients have been linked to an array of health benefits, including weight loss, decreasing anxiety, and warding off the growth of cancer cells. And now new research adds “memory enhancer” to the list. Researchers [...]
Also found in: [+]
Is it safe to go in the water this summer? 15.4.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
For travelers on vacation, how much do you know about the water you’re swimming in? And what is a destination obliged to tell you about pollution?
Also found in: [+]
Massive Ozone Hole Found In Earth's 'Detergent' Layer Over The Pacific, Scientist Warns 15.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This post originally appeared on Climate Central: It turns out the hole in the now famous ozone layer above the South Pole isn’t the only hole in the atmosphere. Researchers recently discovered, to their considerable surprise, that the atmosphere above part of the western tropical Pacific Ocean is nearly devoid of one of the key chemicals that scrubs pollutants from the air. This newfound hole occurs naturally over thousands of kilometers in one of the most remote places on the planet (which accounts for its having gone unnoticed until now) and one of the main spots where air is sent up to the stratosphere . The stratosphere is the layer of Earth's atmosphere above the troposphere , the layer where humans live and in which most weather occurs. Having air shooting up to this layer without first being “washed” of all the junk that humans and nature put into the atmosphere has uncertain implications for the health of the planet’s protective ozone layer and its overall climate. In tropical thunderstorms over ...
Also found in: [+]
Largest Cleanup in EPA History Proposed 14.4.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
In an historic action that will protect people's health and the environment, and benefit riverfront communities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed a plan to remove 4.3 million cubic yards of highly contaminated sediment from the lower eight miles of the Passaic River in New Jersey. The sediment in the Passaic River is severely contaminated with dioxin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, pesticides and other contaminants from more than a century of industrial activity. Ninety percent of the volume of contaminated sediments in the lower Passaic are in the lower eight miles of the river.
Also found in: [+]
Oil and gas industry must stop silencing victims 14.4.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Kate Sinding, Senior Attorney, New York City: What is the fracking industry trying to sell us in Marcellus? Certainly not logical consistency. In one notorious case, now described at length by Jonathan H. Marks in The Hastings Center Report, we get a stark look at the contradictory...
Also found in: [+]
Exponential City Growth Presents 'Window Of Opportunity' For Companies, The Environment 14.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO, April 14 (Reuters) - The world's urban areas are set to grow by almost twice the size of Manhattan a day until 2030 and the design of future cities in Asia and Africa will be crucial to slow global warming, a U.N. study showed on Monday. The breakneck expansion means billion-dollar opportunities for companies, ranging from greener construction of homes and offices to improved rail and bus networks, according to a report by the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). "There is a window of opportunity" to enlist urban design to slow global warming, said Karen Seto, a professor at Yale University who co-led a chapter about city planning in a 2,000-page IPCC report about slowing climate change. A 33-page IPCC summary - with a photo of Shanghai on the cover - was issued on Sunday. It said yet-to-be-built cities could help slow warming but most details are in a 116-page chapter, obtained by Reuters before publication on Tuesday. In ...
Also found in: [+]
Invasive Lionfish On The Decline In Jamaica After National Campaign To Save Reefs 14.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Jamaica is reporting a big decline in sightings of lionfish, the voracious invasive species that has been wreaking havoc on regional reefs for years and wolfing down native juvenile fish and crustaceans. Some four years after a national campaign got started to slash numbers of the candy-striped predator with a mane of venomous spines, Jamaica's National Environment and Planning Agency is reporting a 66 percent drop in sightings of lionfish in coastal waters with depths of 75 feet (23 meters). Dayne Buddo, a Jamaican marine ecologist who focuses on marine invaders at the Caribbean island's University of the West Indies, attributes much of the local decrease in sightings to a growing appetite for their fillets. He said Sunday that Jamaican fishermen are now selling lionfish briskly at markets. In contrast, a few years ago island fishermen "didn't want to mess" with the exotic fish with spines that can deliver a very painful sting. "After learning how to handle them, the fishermen ...
Also found in: [+]
Guest: The failure of the EPA to protect the public from pollution 12.4.2014 Seattle Times: Opinion
Can we trust the EPA to do what is in the public’s best interest? Not if history is any guide, writes guest columnist E.G. Vallianatos.
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change, Media, Psychology & the Denial of Death 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
On the standard, commercial television channels we hear about extreme weather virtually every single day. Droughts in the southwest hardly seen since the days of the Dust Bowl and bizarre weather such as we saw this winter of snow in Houston, vast wildfires in California, mudslides north of Seattle and massive flooding in nothing other than hip and affluent Boulder, Colorado have besieged our beautiful country and world. It very much appears that nowhere any longer is secure from unpredictable and precipitous, extreme weather. Internationally, we have seen an earthquake coincide with a tsunami in Japan coinciding then with the nuclear disaster of Fukushima. It continues to radiate far and wide. A tsunami in the Philippines and a powerful earthquake in Northern Chile are but a few examples of the extreme weather our planet has been experiencing in the last few years. But as one hears the CNN coverage of these disasters, rather astonishingly, one hears little reference to what might be causes of extreme ...
Also found in: [+]
Fighting Our Fossil-Nuke Extinction 10.4.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Harvey Wasserman

ShutterstockThe 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez disaster has brought critical new evidence that petro-pollution is destroying our global ecosystem.

read more

Also found in: [+]
Jar Of French Mountain Air Sells For $860 In Smog-Choked China 10.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BEIJING (AP) — Beijing artist Liang Kegang returned from a business trip in southern France with well-rested lungs and a small item of protest against his home city's choking pollution: a glass jar of clean, Provence air. He put it up for auction before a group of about 100 Chinese artists and collectors late last month, and it fetched 5,250 yuan ($860). "Air should be the most valueless commodity, free to breathe for any vagrant or beggar," Liang said in an interview. "This is my way to question China's foul air and express my dissatisfaction." Liang's work is part of a gust of recent artistic protest — and entrepreneurial gimmickry — reflecting widespread dissatisfaction over air quality in China, where cities often are immersed days on end in harmful pollutants at levels many times what is considered safe by the World Health Organization. The chronic problem has spurred brisk markets for dust masks and home air purifiers. China's senior leaders have pledged to clean the country's air, partly in ...
Also found in: [+]
Fracking in the Bakken threatens Missouri River watershed health 10.4.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Marcus Griswold, Water Resources Scientist, San Francisco: Science continues to point to the risks of groundwater contamination from oil and gas development, not just from oil, but from the salty liquid waste called brine. The U.S. Geological Survey recently released a study highlighting groundwater contamination from oil...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 9,701