User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Sep 05 2015 24:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How Much Bacteria Is in Your Burger? 4.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture Just in time to put a damper on your Labor Day barbecue, the latest edition of Consumer Reports Magazine hit newsstands yesterday with the cover story, " How Safe is Your Ground Beef? " Our two-word summary: Not very. In fact, the recent Consumer Reports study profiled in the article revealed that every sample of ground beef collected by researchers from supermarkets around the country contained enterococcus and/or nontoxin-producing E. coli, which indicate fecal contamination. In other words, all the beef had poop on it. Pretty gross. And pretty dangerous - since feces can contain a host of harmful bacteria that can sicken (or kill) humans, this degree of contamination presents a serious food safety risk. In fact, according to a report by the FDA and CDC, 46 percent of E. coli O157 illnesses and nine percent of foodborne Salmonella illnesses could be attributed to beef. Between 2003 and 2012, outbreaks of E. coli O157 related to beef (mostly ground beef) ...
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How Much Bacteria Is in Your Burger? 4.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture Just in time to put a damper on your Labor Day barbecue, the latest edition of Consumer Reports Magazine hit newsstands yesterday with the cover story, " How Safe is Your Ground Beef? " Our two-word summary: Not very. In fact, the recent Consumer Reports study profiled in the article revealed that every sample of ground beef collected by researchers from supermarkets around the country contained enterococcus and/or nontoxin-producing E. coli, which indicate fecal contamination. In other words, all the beef had poop on it. Pretty gross. And pretty dangerous - since feces can contain a host of harmful bacteria that can sicken (or kill) humans, this degree of contamination presents a serious food safety risk. In fact, according to a report by the FDA and CDC, 46 percent of E. coli O157 illnesses and nine percent of foodborne Salmonella illnesses could be attributed to beef. Between 2003 and 2012, outbreaks of E. coli O157 related to beef (mostly ground beef) ...
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Polluters Spend Millions Lobbying the Government to Lie to You About Whether the Air is Safe to Breathe 4.9.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
John Walke, Clean Air Director/ Senior Attorney, Washington, D.C.: In my last two blog posts, I've explained falsehoods at the heart of an industry campaign opposing updated national health standards to limit smog air pollution. Now, stepping back from the falsehoods that make up that dirty air campaign, one...
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Higher Power: Joining with Pope Francis in the Fight for Healthcare Justice 4.9.2015 Commondreams.org Views
RoseAnn DeMoro

Imagine if the tens of millions of nurses in the world start working actively together with the leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics, 16 percent of the planet’s population, on confronting the health consequences of climate change and environmental degradation.

And, jointly pressing all nations – including the most recalcitrant, our own – to accept healthcare as a fundamental human right.

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Environmental, Public Health, and Civil Rights Groups Unveil New Environmental Justice Ad Campaign 4.9.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire

Today, the Sierra Club, EarthJustice, the NAACP, Physicians for Social Responsibility, and Moms Clean Air Force, hosted a tele-press conference to release a major new ad campaign drawing attention to the disproportionate impacts of smog pollution on the health of communities of color.

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Broad Set of Voices Agree: EPA’s Proposed Methane Pollution Standard is Common Sense 3.9.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Felice Stadler Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed the first-ever nationwide standards to reduce methane pollution from the oil and gas industry. It’s a common sense move: With its potent global warming power and low-cost solutions, cutting methane is the biggest bargain for greenhouse gas reductions in the energy business. The array of supporters speaking out in favor of the proposal underscores just how smart, practical and doable EPA’s move is. Applause has come from voices as diverse as citizens impacted by oil and gas development and investors to government leaders in the heart of oil and gas country. Here’s just a sample of the voices we’ve heard over the past two weeks: Communities in the Crosshairs Methane is a potent climate forcer, but it also carries with it serious health impacts because it’s emitted alongside toxic and smog-forming pollutants. Low income and communities of color often are closest to industrial sources of air pollution, putting them at ...
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COURT: Worst Mercury Pollution in Maine’s History Must be Cleaned Up 2.9.2015 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
BANGOR, Maine (September 2, 2015) – A Maine court today held the former owners of a chlorine bleach plant accountable for tons of mercury it dumped into the Penobscot River over the course of four decades. The judge ordered the polluter to remedy their mess in order to reduce contamination in wildlife and ...
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The Russian Town Where Startling Pollution Is a Way of Life 1.9.2015 Wired Top Stories
Pollution has spawned horrific health problems among the town's 13,000 inhabitants. An Italian photographer went inside to share a story few have ever ...
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Even safe levels of air pollution found to have health impacts in European study 30.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Particulate matter and NO2 air pollution are associated with increased risk of severe heart attacks despite being within European recommended levels, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Jean-Francois Argacha, a cardiologist at University Hospital Brussels (UZ Brussel-Vrije Universiteit Brussel), in Belgium.1"Dramatic health consequences of air pollution were first described in Belgium in 1930 after the Meuse Valley fog," said Dr Argacha. "Nowadays, the World Health Organization (WHO) considers air pollution as one of the largest avoidable causes of mortality. Besides the pulmonary and carcinogenic effects of air pollution, exposition to air pollution has been associated with an increased risk in cardiovascular mortality."
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Change Everything or Face A Global Katrina 30.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Algae blooms put Minnesota's $13B backbone - lakes - under siege 29.8.2015 Pioneer Press: Most Viewed

Overall, more than 600 of Minnesota's famous 10,000 lakes are rated as not able to fully support aquatic recreation -- including even the remote Lake of the Woods, which has regular summer algae blooms. And gross-looking lakes could have real costs.

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Elevated Indoor Air Pollution Levels During NDTV Breathe Clean Conclave in New Delhi 29.8.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Anjali Jaiswal, Senior Attorney, San Francisco: Guest blog by Nehmat Kaur, NRDC India Representative in New Delhi NDTV, a popular media house in India, organized a televised experts discussion on ways to address air quality challenges across India earlier this week as part of its "Breathe...
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Colorado ahead of the curve on methane, VOC regs 29.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
With all the worry over the future of coal, residents of Northwest Colorado can breathe a sigh relief knowing the state is ahead of the curve on the Environmental Protection Agency’s new methane and volatile organic compound regulations. “While the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is still in the process of reviewing the EPA’s proposed rule, they anticipate it will complement and not interfere with steps Colorado has already taken in striking a balance between the state's need for a healthy oil and gas industry and resident concern about health, safety and the environment,” said Gov. John Hickenlooper in a statement. Chris Colclasure, planning and policy program manager for Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Air Pollution Control Division, said he doesn’t think oil and gas developers in the state have much to adapt to under the federal regulations. “It’s certainly easier for the state to implement, because we’ve got some experience,” he said. Colorado has stricter ...
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Dirty Air Campaign Opposing Safe Air for Americans Founded on Falsehoods 29.8.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
John Walke, Clean Air Director/ Senior Attorney, Washington, D.C.: Lobbyists for polluting industry and their political allies are increasingly resorting to misrepresentation and fear mongering to oppose national health standards that deliver on the law's guarantee of safe air for all Americans. I follow yesterday's post by continuing to...
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Study links air pollution to low GPAs 28.8.2015 Environmental News Network
A University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) study on children’s health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs.
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Breathing Boston air is like smoking 5 cigarettes a year 28.8.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Breathing Boston air is like smoking 5 cigarettes a year
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What the newly proposed EPA methane rules mean for California 28.8.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Tim O'Connor Last week, the U.S. EPA released a historic proposal for new rules to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, a step toward meeting the ambitious national goal of reducing these emissions 40 to 45 percent in the next decade. California is a step ahead, with new regulations already in development to cut methane from oil and gas operations within its borders. Even as the rest of the nation begins to catch up, it’s critical that California continues to move forward with developing state standards that complement the federal rules, and go even further when necessary. Methane emissions from the oil and gas industry are a massive problem – the industry emits more than 7 million tons of the potent greenhouse gas each year, equivalent to the 20-year climate impact of 160 coal-fired power plants. And the latest scientific research indicates the problem is even bigger than we think. For example, a study published just last week says previously unrecorded emissions from thousands of ...
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Welcome to Beautiful Parkersburg, West Virginia! 27.8.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Hold on to something,” Jim Tennant warned as he fired up his tractor. We lurched down a rutted dirt road past the old clapboard farmhouse where he grew up. Jim still calls it “the home place,” although its windows are now boarded up and the outhouse is crumbling into the field. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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Frozen Green Beans Recalled Over Listeria Scare 27.8.2015 Yahoo: Business
General Mills is recalling a limited quantity of frozen green beans after a package tested positive for the presence of Listeria.
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How Safe Is Your Ground Beef? 27.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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