User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Aug 18 2017 03:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in Pompeii 17.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhoea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.- The concentrations were high and were definitely problematic for the ancient Romans. Their drinking water must have been decidedly hazardous to health.
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Heavily used pesticide linked to breathing problems in farmworkers' children 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Elemental sulfur, the most heavily used pesticide in California, may harm the respiratory health of children living near farms that use the pesticide, according to new research led by UC Berkeley.In a study of children in the Salinas Valley’s agricultural community, researchers found significant associations between elemental sulfur use and poorer respiratory health. The study linked reduced lung function, more asthma-related symptoms and higher asthma medication use in children living about a half-mile or less from recent elemental sulfur applications compared to unexposed children.
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New Report Outlines Research Agenda to Better Understand the Relationship Among Microbiomes, Indoor Environments, and Human Health 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Even with a growing body of research on microorganisms and humans in indoor environments, many of their interconnections remain unknown, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report proposes a research agenda to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the formation, dynamics, and functions of indoor microbiomes that can guide improvements to current and future buildings as well as enhance human health and well-being.
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Researchers to study chemical contamination of US waters 15.8.2017 Seattle Times: Local

SOUTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. (AP) — University of Rhode Island and Harvard University professors are collaborating through a new research center to study chemicals that have contaminated water at sites nationwide. The chemicals, called perfluorinated chemicals, have been linked to cancer and other illnesses. Water has been contaminated near sites of industrial facilities and U.S. military […]
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Air pollution linked to cardiovascular disease; air purifiers may lessen impact 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.
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A Global Greening: Green Building Certification Programs Make Gains 14.8.2017 WRI Stories
A Global Greening: Green Building Certification Programs Make GainsAdd Comment|PrintWith natural daylight and energy-efficient LED lighting, WRI’s global office renovation is certified LEED Silver. Photo by John Cole/Fox Architects In August, WRI received the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver certification for the 2016 renovation of its global office in Washington DC. The certification adds to WRI’s expanding portfolio of green office spaces, which also includes the WRI China Office,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Democratic attorneys escalate legal fight against Trump 13.8.2017 AP Top News
NEW YORK (AP) -- The Trump resistance movement cheered when Democratic attorneys general in several states sued to block the president's plan to bar travelers from some Muslim majority countries....
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Technology tracks bee talk to help improve honey bee health 9.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Simon Fraser University graduate student Oldooz Pooyanfar is monitoring what more than 20,000 honeybees housed in hives in a Cloverdale field are “saying” to each other—looking for clues about their health. Pooyanfar’s technology is gleaning communication details from sound within the hives with her beehive monitoring system—technology she developed at SFU. She says improving knowledge about hone
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Jerry Brown talks a green game. So why isn't California tougher on these polluters? 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Do regulators in California have your back when utilities or industries run amok, or when there’s a threat to public health in your neighborhood?

We’d all like to think so, but there’s a long history of coziness between regulators, industry titans and politicians. So you’d have to be a hopeless...

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When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice 9.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
CRISPR gene editing can fight crop disease far more benignly than conventional practices.
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L.A. to make sure air filters are being installed in homes near freeways 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Mayor Eric Garcetti has ordered Los Angeles building inspectors to begin tracking whether required air filtration systems are being installed in new homes near freeways, officials said Tuesday.

The Department of Building and Safety will add a “check box” to its inspection forms to ensure dwellings...

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The mystery of the yellowing sugarcane 9.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Since 2011, a mysterious illness known as Yellow Canopy Syndrome, or YCS, has afflicted Australian sugarcane. The condition causes the mid-canopy leaves of otherwise healthy plants to rapidly turn yellow to a degree that the plant's sugar yield can decrease by up to 30 percent.In recent years, the syndrome has spread across the continent. Losses are estimated at around $40 million and growers fear it could ruin the industry in Australia."At the start of the project, there were many possibilities but little evidence to suggest the cause," says Kate Hertweck, an assistant professor of biology at The University of Texas at Tyler (UT Tyler) and a member of the team of researchers exploring the causes of the disease. "It could be a physiological reaction caused by water or nutrients in the soil. Or it could be a biological cause, like an insect, virus or ...
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Every breath you take: Air pollution from idling cars puts kids at risk 8.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Drivers who drop off their kids at school should turn off their enginesWe think of schools as safe places for children but an invisible hazard is lurking right outside the front door,  says a new study from the University of Toronto.
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Remember those smoggy 60s? We do, don't repeal clear air provisions 8.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Re: "State limited in its fight to save anti-smog rules," Aug. 3

To the editor: Sixty-five years ago, when I was with the then-County of Los Angeles Air Pollution Controls District, air pollution in parts of Los Angeles County was so bad that if one of us went to speak about what was called "smog"...

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What we know about California's largest toxic cleanup: Thousands of L.A. County homes tainted with lead 6.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary
By this fall, the state plans to begin cleaning lead-tainted soil at 2,500 homes near a shuttered battery plant. But thousands more residents are unsure when, or if, their homes will be cleaned.
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U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
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U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
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U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
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These charts show why communities are demanding common sense standards to protect them from oil and gas pollution 4.8.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Felice Stadler EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has been trying every trick in the book to suspend rules that require oil and gas companies to limit pollution from their operations as they look to expand drilling across the country. His attempted delay tactics follows a cozy relationship he’s had with the worst elements of the oil and gas industry in his prior role as Attorney General of Oklahoma, where he sued to block these very rules on the behalf of his oil and gas allies. Following a historic court decision  and subsequent mandate , EPA’s New Source Performance Standards (which set first-ever national methane pollution limits for the industry) are now in effect. However, Administrator Pruitt continues to push to delay these standards with a proposed two-year suspension. The impact of this action is sweeping: Hundreds of thousands of Americans live near the 23,000 oil and gas wells that should be covered by these rules. The senseless delays of common sense pollution standards have major implications ...
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Ongoing monitoring program finds potato psyllids but no evidence of bacteria that causes zebra chip disease 4.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
University of Lethbridge biogeography professor Dr. Dan Johnson and his team have been monitoring Prairie potato fields for the past few years, looking for evidence of the potato psyllid insect and a bacterium it can carry that can lead to zebra chip disease in potato crops.“We found hundreds of potato psyllids last year, but we have found under 10 so far this year and none have the bacteria that cause zebra chip,” says Johnson, who coordinates the Canadian Potato Psyllid and Zebra Chip Monitoring Network.
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