User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Environmental Health
Last updated: Sep 03 2014 07:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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2.8 bln risk ill health from home air pollution 3.9.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
"These smoky, dirty fuels are often used in an open fire or simple stove, resulting in high levels of household air pollution in poorly ventilated homes," said a statement, released Wednesday. Led by Stephen Gordon of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and William Martin of Ohio State University, the team concluded that 600-800 million families worldwide are at higher risk of respiratory tract infections, pneumonia, asthma, lung cancer and other ailments as a result of the air they breathe at home. Studies in India have found that household air pollution can be three times higher than on a typical London Street, and well above the World Health Organization's recommended safety levels. "Estimates suggest that household air pollution killed 3.5 to four million people in 2010," wrote the ...
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EPA technical experts recommend strengthening health safeguards for ground-level ozone pollution, commonly known as smog 3.9.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
EPA technical experts recommend strengthening health safeguards for ground-level ozone pollution, commonly known as smog
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When a home poses health risks, the floor may be the culprit 3.9.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
When Gayatri Datar looks at the ground beneath her feet, she sees an opportunity to improve public health.
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Ebola vaccine trial begins 2.9.2014 CNN: Top Stories
A highly anticipated test of an experimental Ebola vaccine will begin this week at the National Institutes of Health, amid mounting anxiety about the spread of the deadly virus in West Africa.
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What teenagers need to know about pot 1.9.2014 LA Times: Nation
Kelly Kerby is a licensed mental health counselor and chemical dependency professional who works at Eckstein Middle School in Seattle. Inga Manskopf manages the Prevention WINS Coalition at Seattle Children's Hospital.
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Climate Change This Week: Rising Health Risks and Heat, Rising Renewables, and More! 31.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Daily Climate Change: Global Map of Unusual Temperatures, Aug 29 2014 How unusual has the weather been? No one event is "caused" by climate change, but global warming, which is predicted to increase unusual, extreme weather, is having a daily effect on weather, worldwide. Looking above at recent temperature anomalies, much of the US is cooler than normal, but the eastern Pacific warm spot continues to prevent much rain from reaching California, which is hotter than normal. The North Pole and surroundings are experiencing much warmer than normal temperatures - not good news for our Arctic thermal shield of ice. Hotter than usual temperatures continue to dominate human habitats. (Add 0.3-0.4 C to have these anomaly values calibrate with those of NASA.) Daily updates of can be seen here for both the temperature anomalies map, and the jetstream map. For real time animated US surface wind patterns, click here , and here , for the planet. ...
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California Legislature Sends a Bumper Crop of Environmental Legislation to Governor Brown for Signature 30.8.2014 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. (August 30, 2014) – Californians can breathe easier today knowing that the state legislature passed groundbreaking policies to protect public health and clean up our environment. As the 2013-14 California Legislative session drew to a close early this morning, environmental and health groups celebrated big wins for clean air, clean transportation, coastal protection, chemical disclosure, healthy communities and clean ...
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Right to Know Reader: Cancer-Causing Power Plants Might Be Closer Than You Think 30.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo by Solovyova Lyudmyla When you think about sources of toxic air pollution, one of the first things you might picture is a large power plant with huge smoke stacks belching black clouds into the sky. But the truth is that smaller power plants collectively contribute more to the cancer risk faced by Americans every day. Consider the Evergreen Community Power Plant near Reading, Penn., a small power plant that burns wood waste from the forestry and construction industries. The plant spews out an alarming toxic cloud of chemicals , including lead, chromium, nickel, mercury, cobalt, beryllium and cadmium, many of which have been shown to cause cancer. But the Evergreen community may not even know it's there because the facility avoids the public disclosure and public process requirements faced by larger power plants by claiming to keep barely under the emissions thresholds that define it as a small, stationary source . According to the EPA, smaller polluters like this -- including factories and chemical ...
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Sierra Club Applauds Proposed Protections from Smog Protection 29.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Why Nurture is Just as Important as Nature for Understanding Genetics 29.8.2014 Truthout.com
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Summit County health officials warn of possible diesel water contamination 29.8.2014 Salt Lake Tribune
Summit County health officials on Friday cautioned water-users downstream of a crash near Echo Creek between semi-trailer rig and an SUV hauling a trailer to keep a lookout for possible fuel contamination. The crash occurred 5:15 p.m. Thursday on westbound Interstate 80 at mile marker 176. No injuries were reported, but the semi’s fuel tanks ruptured during the accident and leaked diesel into the creek. North Summit Fire District spokesman Tyler Rowser said that hazardous materials workers stopp...
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Taking steps to curb climate change would have a big impact on public health 29.8.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Too often, health impacts are left out of the conversation on climate change. That is unfortunate, because climate change threatens our ability to protect Minnesotans against the dangers of air pollution and increased allergens and asthma triggers linked to warmer summers, extreme weather and smoke from wildfires. This is especially true of the most vulnerable Minnesotans — the young, the elderly and those living with lung disease. Power plants are the largest stationary source of greenhouse gases in the United States, and are a major source of air pollution in Minnesota. Placing carbon limits on existing power plants will not only reduce greenhouse gases, it will also reduce the amount of particulate pollution these plants emit. The negative health impacts of particulate pollution are well documented and include exacerbating lung diseases and causing cancer or premature death. We know that temperature is a factor in ozone pollution, one of the major types of ...
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Experimental Ebola Vaccine Will Be Put To Human Test 29.8.2014 NPR News
Animal tests have been encouraging, but there's no guarantee the new vaccine will work in people. Several vaccines against Ebola have been tested before, but none has made it to the finish line.
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Tagging toxics: Legislation green lights labeling of harmful chemicals in household furniture 28.8.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: Today, the California legislature voted to give consumers the right to know whether they are bringing home a toxic couch. This first-in-the nation legislation (SB 1019), authored by Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), requires the furniture’s attached label to clearly...
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How Foster Farms is solving the case of the mystery salmonella 28.8.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A peek inside the anti-salmonella campaign of California's biggest chicken producer.
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Contamination Examination 28.8.2014 Philly.com News
Here is a look at the contaminants involved in the cleanup: What is it? Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is one of the most common types of perfluorinated compounds in the United States. They were developed in the 1950s and used for decades in products such as firefighting foam, nonstick coating, textiles, semiconductors, and paper products. PFOS is no longer manufactured in the United States.
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How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella 28.8.2014 NPR News
Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
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Bi-Partisan Vote Approves Legislation to Find and Fix Natural Gas Leaks 28.8.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Bi-Partisan Vote Approves Legislation to Find and Fix Natural Gas Leaks
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These chemical initiatives deserve your support 27.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Toxins and super pollutants don't have to be business as usual. Here are two ways to get rid of them.

These chemical initiatives deserve your support
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How Cutting Emissions Pays Off 26.8.2014 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions?
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