User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Health System
Last updated: May 05 2015 20:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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3 Unsung Women Who Changed Science Forever 5.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Some of history's unsung innovators get their due in the new book Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science -- and the World by Rachel Swaby. A sample of the distinguished discoverers.... By Zoe ...
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Ebola victim's family says hospital's donation falls short 5.5.2015 Yahoo: US National
DALLAS (AP) — The family of the only person to die of Ebola in the United States said a Dallas hospital's donation to combat the disease in Africa fell far short of what they hoped.
Iron Range hospital finds new life with Essentia in charge 5.5.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
The taxpayer-owned Virginia Regional Medical Center was struggling financially when Essentia Health took over the operation. Even skeptics say Essentia's made things better, though concerns remain.
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Colorado health insurance exchange fixing system without CTO on board 5.5.2015 Denver Post: News: Local
State health insurance exchange officials say the overhaul of their online enrollment system is proceeding on track, despite the recent departure of the chief technology ...
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When Hospitals Close, Frequent Fears About Care Aren't Realized 5.5.2015 NPR: Healthcare
Mortality rates for Medicare patients don't rise in communities after their hospitals shut down, say Harvard researchers who analyzed 195 closures across the country.
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Why Health Insurers May Be Destined to Follow Blockbuster Into Irrelevance 4.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Remember Blockbuster? In its heyday -- which wasn't so long ago -- Blockbuster had 60,000 employees and 9,000 locations. For most Americans, for a minute anyway, it was the place to rent a movie. Then along came Netflix. And Redbox, which operates most of the movie-rental kiosks in convenience and grocery stores. Before you knew it, Blockbuster was no longer a necessity. All of a sudden, it seemed, we could get the video entertainment we wanted faster and cheaper and, at least with Netflix, without having to leave the comfort of our homes. In 2010, Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy, just 25 years after it was founded. By last year, the last of those 9,000 stores had closed. What will be the next Blockbuster? It very well might be your health insurance company, says Steven Brill, the entrepreneur and journalist whose 26,000-word Time magazine cover story about the absurdly high costs of American health care captured the nation's attention two years ago. "I see insurance companies as the weak players" in ...
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Triage And Treatment: Untold Health Stories From Baltimore's Unrest 4.5.2015 NPR News
Shuttered pharmacies and concerns about public safety in Baltimore contributed to health problems ranging from unfilled prescriptions to people delaying care for asthma and diabetes.
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MNsure chief Scott Leitz to step down after 18 months 4.5.2015 MinnPost

MNsure Executive Director Scott Leitz is stepping down after 18 months as head of the beleaguered health care exchange.

Reports today from the AP and others say that Leitz will formally resign at a MNsure board meeting this afternoon; an interim head is expected to be named by the board.

Leitz will join a health-care think tank.

He took the job in December 2013, after the April Todd-Malmlov left in the midst of technical troubles at the exchange.

Before the MNsure job, Leitz had been an assistant commissioner of health care at the state Department of Human Services.

'Health Care Equity Key to Ebola Fight': Doctors, Nurses Petition Obama 4.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Sepsis, A Wily Killer, Stymies Doctors' Efforts To Tame It 4.5.2015 NPR News
It's a deadly combination of infection and inflammation striking more than a million Americans every year. Doctors can treat the symptoms of sepsis, but they still can't treat the underlying problem.
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Put Yourself in the Jury Box: Did These 8 Men Deserve to Die? 4.5.2015 Mother Jones
In the sentencing phase of a death penalty trial, a good defense lawyer presents mitigating evidence. That's information that may show that the defendant lacks the "extreme culpability" the courts require for execution—in theory, at least. He may be intellectually disabled (a.k.a. mentally retarded), a circumstance for which the Supreme Court has issued a blanket exception (although it is not always heeded). He may be insane, a harder-to-prove designation that applies only to certain defendants with severe mental illness. He may (and many do) have a history of severe trauma. Or he may simply be young. The Supreme Court has banned the execution of anyone under 18 at the time of his crime, although that, of course, is arbitrary. Lawyers for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was 19 when he helped his older brother carry out the Boston Marathon bombings, have spent the past couple of weeks arguing that he should be spared, essentially because he was a kid in the thrall of his brother, the alleged ringleader. After ...
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How to stick to a prescription drug regimen 4.5.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Americans have a hard time taking their meds.
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Ohio Clinics Close, Abortions Decline Amid Restrictions 3.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The number of abortion providers in Ohio has shrunk by half amid a flurry of restrictive new laws over the past four years, and the number of the procedures also is declining, according to a review of records by The Associated Press. Both sides agree the added limits and hurdles placed on Ohio abortions have played a role in facility closures reaching to every corner of the nation's 7th most populous state. What is less clear is whether the downward trajectory in procedures is a cause or an effect of some of the most significantly reduced abortion access in the nation. Seven of 16 Ohio abortion providers have either closed since 2011 or curtailed abortion offerings, while an eighth, in Toledo, is operating under the cloud of pending litigation, according to AP interviews and examinations of state licensing and business records. The plunge places Ohio second in closures nationally, behind Texas, where 17 of 40 providers have stopped operating since 2011. The recent shuttering of two ...
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Doctors' financial interests, and potential conflicts, have become public information 3.5.2015 Star Tribune: Business
Doctors’ financial interests, and potential conflicts, have become public information
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Who Keeps Track If Your Surgery Goes Well Or Fails? 3.5.2015 NPR Health Science
The outcomes of many medical procedures and treatments done in hospitals nationwide aren't tracked or even measured, says a surgeon who thinks that's bad. Understanding outcomes, he says, saves lives.
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ERROR: Missing Story Title 3.5.2015 Boston Globe: Latest

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Letters to Nurses (Full) 3.5.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Read the complete set of nominations this year.
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Minnesota's crackdown on Medicaid fraud yields millions in savings 3.5.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
Stepped-up effort by Department of Human Services to screen providers more than doubles dollars recovered.
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St. Christopher's prom delights children with cancer 3.5.2015 Philly.com News
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes.
Doctors' financial ties to their device companies exposed 3.5.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
Doctors’ financial interests, and potential conflicts, have become public information
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