User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Sep 01 2014 13:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Colorado researchers probe Parkinson's disease causes, treatments 1.9.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
The corn rows are high and tassled, pumpkins are gaining girth and, amid these signs the fall harvest is near, evidence is growing that farmers and others who live or work around pesticides are at greater risk for neurogenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
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Pesticides on the Playground 31.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Pesticides on the Playground 31.8.2014 Truthout.com
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Hillary Clinton is Just Plain Wrong on GMOs 29.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Defang Agriculture 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
At the end of book XXII of Homer's "Odyssey," we read that Odysseus fumigated his house with sulphur. This was sometimes in the 1200s BCE. More than three thousand years later, in the 1950s and 1960s, my father used sulphur to protect his grape vines from disease. Thus "pesticides" have a long history. But despite my vague knowledge of my father's rare use of sulphur in his small farm in Greece, I never thought about pesticides. They were things one used in emergencies. All this changed dramatically when I joined the US Environmental Protection Agency in 1979. My position was with the very organization that "regulates" pesticides in America, EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs. My colleagues made it easy for me to learn quickly. They explained what they did and gave me samples of their written work. Talking to my colleagues and reading their papers opened the secret world of pesticides to me. Many modern pesticides are chemicals from chlorine and petroleum. Pesticides received a tremendous boost from ...
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Reading, Writing, and ...Toxic Pesticides? 27.8.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Miriam Rotkin-Ellman, Scientist, San Francisco: Parents worry about plenty of things when they send their kids to school: first- day jitters, making friends, bullying … But exposure to toxic chemicals isn’t usually on the list of “back to school” worries. Perhaps it should be, though....
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Kauaʻi residents and community leaders respond to federal court ruling in lawsuit by chemical companies: “This Battle is Far From Over” 26.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Chlorpyrifos: Banned for Most Americans, Farmworkers and Their Children Left Behind 23.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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What's Holding Back the Organic Food and Farming Revolution 23.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Santa Clara County: Fogging concerns outweighed by virus risk, according to reports 22.8.2014 San Jose Mercury News: San Jose/Valley
Responding out an outbreak of concerns about mosquito fogging during a buzzing West Nile season, Santa Clara County officials on Thursday heard staff reports outlining why they believe the dangers posed by the virus outweigh any potential pesticide threat.
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Despite Progress, Long Fight Ahead to Protect Rare Wildlife From Pesticides 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hardly news that many of the more than 18,000 pesticide products approved for use in this country have been linked to cancer and other severe health effects in humans. Indeed, more than one billion pounds of pesticides are dumped on the North American landscape every year. Some chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors , interfere with the natural hormones in our bodies that regulate reproduction, brain function and immune response, and may be linked to increased risk for developmental and reproductive problems in both humans and wildlife. Despite the well-documented risks, the U.S. has continued to allow the widespread use of these chemicals, even while they've been banned in other countries. The European Union, for example, has outlawed atrazine , a widely used weed-killer in the U.S. that is also a common contaminant of drinking water and may be linked to increased risk of birth defects in people , frogs and fish . That chemicals remain in widespread use despite known risks reflects serious cracks ...
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Herbicide Use To Increase Dramatically 15.8.2014 Environmental News Network
The US is poised to 'deregulate' GMO corn, soybean and cotton varieties resistant to the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba. The result will be a big increase in the use of those herbicides, as high as 600%. Only a huge public outcry can now stop the GMO-herbicide juggernaut. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued its final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and proposed approval for new GMO corn and soybean varieties genetically engineered to be resistant to the toxic herbicide 2,4-D.
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New GMO Poised for Approval Despite Public Outcry 15.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Tell the EPA to Protect Kids From Pesticides 15.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black." It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when "Jimena," a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. "I got really dizzy," she said, "and I started throwing up." She told me she was sick for two weeks. Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn't know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, ...
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Tell the EPA to Protect Kids from Pesticides 15.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"My head started hurting really bad, and I started seeing like all black." It was mid-afternoon on a scorching summer day in eastern North Carolina when "Jimena," a 14-year-old farmworker, walked into a tobacco field where she had been sent to work. No one told her that the field had been sprayed with pesticides just hours earlier. "I got really dizzy," she said, "and I started throwing up." She told me she was sick for two weeks. Last summer, while I was investigating child labor on tobacco farms in the United States, I met dozens of children with similar stories. Of the 141 children my colleagues and I interviewed, half reported seeing tractors spraying pesticides in fields where they worked or in nearby fields. The kids said they could smell and feel the chemical spray as it drifted toward them. Many of them said they got sick afterward, with searing headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath, and skin rashes. What they didn't know was that pesticide exposure can have serious long-term health effects, ...
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EPA to decide whether to boost the use of popular weed killer 2,4-D 13.8.2014 Star Tribune: Politics
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Decision could boost use of popular weed killer 13.8.2014 Yahoo: US National
WASHINGTON (AP) — Faced with tougher and more resistant weeds, corn and soybean farmers are anxiously awaiting government decisions on a new version of a popular herbicide — and on genetically modified seeds to grow crops designed to resist ...
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The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction 12.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In just 8 years, bats have gone from the most common mammal in the US to endangered species candidates.
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What Are Pesticides, and Why Do We Use Them on the Farm? 12.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When people talk about using chemicals on the farm, oftentimes they use the word "pesticides." To people outside agriculture, pesticides tends to be the catch-all category for any and all chemical compound we spray on our crops. And honestly, that is far from the truth. We don't have a jug labeled "pesticides" that goes on anything and everything. In agriculture we call any sort of chemical we use on the farm "crop-protection products." The truth about the crop-protection products we use on the farm is that we use specific chemicals labeled for very specific uses and at very specific amounts. I've written before that as farmers we have a choice in what seed to select. We also have a choice when it comes to what we put on our crops. It varies depending on crop, soil, crop rotation, current condition of the crop, pests, and moisture. The choices we make regarding what to spray are careful, calculated, and measured out. It is not something we do haphazardly or thoughtlessly like many websites will ...
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Potato grower cuts pesticide use on Minnesota land 11.8.2014 Twincities.com: Local

A Fargo-based potato grower has found that using fewer pesticides is better for business.

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