User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Dec 21 2014 15:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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GreenSpace: 2014's top tips for maintaining environmental health 21.12.2014 P-com Living Green
Sometimes, paying attention to environmental health issues can be a real downer. Those issues often involve air pollution, water pollution, or harmful chemicals.
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Coming Soon: Major GMO Study (Shhh, It Will Be Done in Secret by Russians) 18.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
So here's what happens when Americans don't spend enough time or money testing the safety of our food: Russians say they will do it for us. A group of Russian and European donors recently announced they are raising a whopping $25 million to pay for a major study of the safety of genetically modified food (GMOs) and the ubiquitous herbicide glyphosate, most commonly used as Monsanto's product Roundup. The research project, dubbed "Factor GMO," is being billed as "the world's largest international study on GMO safety." It will examine four primary questions: Is genetically modified food (or the herbicides it is sprayed with) toxic to organ systems over the long-term? Does this food (or its herbicides) cause cancer? Does it reduce fertility or cause birth defects? And is Roundup, as a chemical compound, more or less toxic than its most well-known single ingredient, glyphosate? These are important questions. Since the introduction of genetically engineered seeds in the mid-1990s, the amount of glyphosate ...
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Lab tests show pesticide killed Portland, Ore., crows; unknown whether poisoning intentional 18.12.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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The Chemical Ocean 16.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We live in a toxic chemical sea. Over 50 years ago, Rachael Carson in her seminal books Silent Spring and The Sea Around Us sounded the alarm over the deposition of myriad chemicals into our watersheds and waterways through uncontrolled use of fertilizers and pesticides, manufacturing by-products and waste. There was a sudden focus of public awareness that resulted during the next two decades in certain legislation, regulation, outright banning of certain substances, and regional and international attempts to control what was then a new problem and significant health issue. There was some progress to be sure, but today we may need to understand that those advances have not been sustained and that the issue remains as pervasive and threatening as ever before. In a paper in the Houston Journal of International Law in 2011, David L. VanderZwaag, Professor in Ocean Law and Governance at the Marine and Environmental Law Institute, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, outlined the state of international ...
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Review finds fracking chemicals may harm reproductive health and child development 10.12.2014 TreeHugger
But we find the newest fracking headline backed by a study of little merit
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GMO Contamination Denial: Controlling Science 9.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists have been experiencing blatant suppression of GMO research. (Image via Shutterstock ) Did you ever think that investigation of the potential dangers of putting GMOs (genetically modified organisms) into food would be based on objective research? Or that unbiased reviews of research by academic journals would chart a steady march toward scientific truth? If so, you would be very wrong. Through all of its phases, scientific research is subject to repression, manipulation and more insidious forms of control that push it toward a profit-based consensus. Scientists have been experiencing blatant suppression of GMO research. (Image via Shutterstock ) Did you ever think that investigation of the potential dangers of putting GMOs (genetically modified organisms) into food would be based on objective research? Or that unbiased reviews of research by academic journals would chart a steady march toward scientific truth? If so, you would be very wrong. Through all of its phases, scientific research is ...
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Keys to saving our endangered bees may be just lying along the roadside 9.12.2014 MinnPost
In 1938, the entomologist Edith Patch predicted that by the beginning of this century, the federal government would find it necessary to protect bees and other pollinating insects by planting “insect gardens” across the country, and that “entomologists will be as much or more concerned with the conservation and preservation of beneficial insect life as they are now with the destruction of injurious insects.” —From a presentation by Eric Mӓder of the Xerces Society last Thursday at Hamline University, St. Paul. Last week I attended a highly interesting panel discussion on what can be done to create healthy habitat for Minnesota’s imperiled pollinators, and I came away with an unexpected but most welcome reaction, bordering on optimism. It turns out lots of things can be done, are already being done, and could readily be scaled up to much wider impact to help out not only the commercially managed honeybees but wild bees, butterflies and other pollinators as well. We aren’t talking here about planting a ...
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Reversing Global Warming, Hunger and Poverty: Supercharging the Global Grassroots 5.12.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Home Depot and BJ's Wholesale Club take steps to limit or eliminate bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides in their nursery plants 5.12.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Jennifer Sass, Senior Scientist, Washington, D.C.: Bees and gardeners win! Public pressure successfully pushed Home Depot to start requiring labelling of its nursery plants that are treated with bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides. This means that we can read the label, and avoid buying these plants. That will...
After Three Decades, Quest for Justice Remains Elusive in Bhopal 3.12.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Bhopal's toxic legacy lives on, 30 years after industrial disaster 28.11.2014 Health
By Danish Siddiqui and Nita Bhalla BHOPAL/NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Beyond the iron gates of the derelict pesticide plant where one of the world's worst industrial disasters occurred, administrative buildings lie in ruins, vegetation overgrown and warehouses bolted. Massive vessels, interconnected by a multitude of corroded pipes that once carried chemical slurries, have rusted beyond repair. In the dusty control room, a soiled sticker on a wall panel reads "Safety is everyone's business". On the night of Dec. 2, 1984, the factory owned by the U.S. ...
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Toxic shockers: Key chemicals to look out for 27.11.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
From BPA to burnt toast, pretty much everything in the modern world comes with a hidden cocktail of chemical extras. Get the facts on what to worry about (full text available to ...
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Experts Urge Federal Task Force: Listen to Science. Ditch Neonics 26.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Holiday cheer shouldn't include toxic pesticides 25.11.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: I remember the ritual in our house every November — setting up the nice dining table for the grown-ups, and dusting off the rickety folding table where us kids would crowd in to share our holiday meal (though the sharing...
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Moms, Farmers Head to Court to Keep Maui from Becoming 'Poisoned Paradise' 25.11.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Coalition Steps in to Defend Maui Residents from Pesticides and GE Contamination 25.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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100+ Scientists Call on Obama’s Bee Task Force to Take Action on Pesticides 24.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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'Little Things Matter' Exposes Big Threat To Children's Brains 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Tiny amounts of lead, chemical flame retardants and organophosphate pesticides, among other toxins, course through the blood of nearly every American. But just how much worry is a little poison worth? A lot, especially when considering the cumulative effects of this chemical cocktail on children, warns a video unveiled Thursday during an environmental health conference in Ottawa, Canada. The seven-minute project, "Little Things Matter," draws on emerging scientific evidence that even mild exposures to common contaminants can derail normal brain development -- lowering IQs and raising risks of behavioral conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. "The chemical industry argues that the effect of toxins on children is subtle and of little consequence," co-producer Bruce Lanphear, an environmental health expert at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, states in the video. "But that is misleading." Drop a few tablespoons of sugar into an Olympic-size swimming pool, and you ...
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NRDC and hundreds of thousands of our members tell USDA and EPA to stand up for pollinators! 19.11.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Jennifer Sass, Senior Scientist, Washington, D.C.: The USDA and EPA each hosted a “listening session” on pollinator health recently, where the public — beekeepers, farmers, pesticide manufacturing companies, environmental advocates like me, other public interest groups, etc — all get to stand up and tell the...
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Monsanto Is Using Big Data to Take Over the World 19.11.2014 Mother Jones
You probably know Monsanto as the world's leading producer of genetically engineered seeds—a global agribusiness giant whose critics accuse it of everything from boosting our reliance on pesticides to driving Indian farmers to suicide . But that's actually just the latest in a long series of evolving corporate identities. When the company was founded in 1901 by a St. Louis pharmacist, its initial product was artificial sweetener. Over the next few decades Monsanto expanded into industrial chemicals, releasing its first agricultural herbicide, 2,4-D, in 1945. In the '50s it produced laundry detergent, the infamous insecticide DDT, and chemical components for nuclear bombs. In the '60s it churned out Agent Orange for the Vietnam War. In the '70s it became one of the largest producers of LED lights. It was around this time that Robb Fraley, now Monsanto's chief technology officer, joined the company as a mid-level biotechnology scientist. Back then, he recalls, the company had its hand in oil wells, ...
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