User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Feb 27 2015 04:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Agricultural insecticides pose a global risk to surface water bodies 26.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Streams within approximately 40% of the global land surface are at risk from the application of insecticides. These were the results from the first global map to be modeled on insecticide runoff to surface waters, which has just been published in the journal Environmental Pollution by researchers from the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the University of Koblenz-Landau together with the University of Milan, Aarhus University and Aachen University. According to the publication, particularly streams in the Mediterranean, the USA, Central America and Southeast Asia are at risk.
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Apples Top Dirty Dozen List for Fifth Year in a Row 25.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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USDA Approves "Untested, Inherently Risky" GMO Apple 24.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
On Friday, February 13, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) approved the first genetically engineered apple, despite hundreds of thousands of petitions asking the USDA to reject it. According an article in Politico, the USDA said the GMO apple “doesn’t pose any harm to other plants or pests.” Great. But what about potential harm to the humans who consume them? The Arctic Apple (Golden Delicious and Granny varieties), developed by Canada-based Okanagan Specialty Fruit, shockingly doesn’t require approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Association (FDA). The FDA will merely conduct a “voluntary review” before, presumably, rubber-stamping the apple for use in restaurants, institutions (including schools and hospitals) and grocery stores—with no meaningful long- (or even short-) term safety testing for its potential impact on human health. Here’s why that should concern every consumer out there, especially parents of young children. In April 2013, we interviewed scientists about the genetic engineering ...
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Amplifyd.com Challenges Starbucks and Peet's Coffee to Use Organic Milk 24.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo courtesy of Stonyfield Organic. As a DIVA, once I learned where the milk is sourced from at my local Starbucks and Peet's Coffee, I decided to to search for a new coffee joint that serves organic milk in their lattes. Diva, or not, you too deserve safe milk in your delicious, over-priced coffee drink! These coffee giants both purchase milk from large, industrialized farms who feed their cows a diet comprised of genetically modified corn, soy, alfalfa and cotton seed. Plus, a high dose of antibiotics. Non-organic livestock production is responsible for 80% of all antibiotic use in the world, and the dairy industry in particular, uses the strongest and most dangerous forms. As an example, a super potent antibiotic drug used by commercial dairy farmers called Ceftiofur creates resistant bacteria after only one dose. Scott Blankenship, founder and CEO of www.amplifydpledges.com , a social activism startup based in Berkeley, California, is concerned about the health risks. "Most people are aware that ...
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Will Richmond Reject Roundup? The Case for Banning Glyphosate 23.2.2015 Truthout.com
Richmond, California. (Photo: Wikipedia ; Edited: JR/TO) On Tuesday, the Richmond, California, City Council will consider banning the use of all pesticides by city employees and contractors to protect its residents' health from glyphosate, key ingredient in Monstanto's Roundup, which has been shown to cause fetal deaths and birth defects in animals and DNA damage in humans. Richmond, California. (Photo: Wikipedia ; Edited: JR/TO) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! In July of 2012, the city of Richmond, California, adopted an Integrated Pest Management Ordinance to guide the work of city departments tasked with weed and pest control. The ordinance championed Integrated Pest Management (IMP) as the solution of choice. Pesticide use is to be considered only after all other means of control have failed. The ordinance states : "Pesticides shall be used only as a last resort ...
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Center for Biological Diversity launches new Environmental Health Program 21.2.2015 Environmental News Network
The Center for Biological Diversity this week launched its new Environmental Health program, greatly expanding its capacity to protect wildlife, people and the environment from pesticides, rodenticides, lead, mining, industrial pollution, and air and water pollution.“The future of people is deeply intertwined with the fate of all the other species that evolved beside us,” said Lori Ann Burd, the program’s director. “This new program will work to protect biodiversity and human health from toxic substances while promoting a deep understanding of the connection between the health of people and imperiled species.”
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The Endless Tragedy of Vietnam 21.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
For the U.S. government, old lies die hard, even lies as discredited as blaming the North Vietnamese for the Tonkin Gulf incident in 1964, the non-event that launched the Vietnam War and caused ongoing tragedies for those who bombed and those who were bombed. 21 SEPTEMBER 1966- Crop duster airplanes spray Vietnamese countryside with napalm. (Photo via Shutterstock ) Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That’s Truthout’s goal - support our work with a donation today! This is Vietnam as seen through the lens of five American ex-soldiers: They returned to their former battlefield, where three saw fierce fighting, to live full time among and to aid the people burdened by two terrible legacies of that war. These tragedies are the thousands of children and farmers who still are blown up or injured by bombs dropped half a century ago that didn't explode back then. And the chillingly large number of children and adults who suffer from the effects of the world's most poisonous defoliant, Agent ...
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The Endless Tragedy of Vietnam 21.2.2015 Truthout.com
For the U.S. government, old lies die hard, even lies as discredited as blaming the North Vietnamese for the Tonkin Gulf incident in 1964, the non-event that launched the Vietnam War and caused ongoing tragedies for those who bombed and those who were bombed. 21 SEPTEMBER 1966- Crop duster airplanes spray Vietnamese countryside with napalm. (Photo via Shutterstock ) Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That’s Truthout’s goal - support our work with a donation today! This is Vietnam as seen through the lens of five American ex-soldiers: They returned to their former battlefield, where three saw fierce fighting, to live full time among and to aid the people burdened by two terrible legacies of that war. These tragedies are the thousands of children and farmers who still are blown up or injured by bombs dropped half a century ago that didn't explode back then. And the chillingly large number of children and adults who suffer from the effects of the world's most poisonous defoliant, Agent ...
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New Environmental Health Program Will Focus on Protecting Wildlife, People from Pesticides, Lead and Other Toxic Pollutants 21.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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What Are We Doing to Our Children's Brains? 20.2.2015 Truthout.com
The numbers are startling. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1.8 million more children in the U.S. were diagnosed with developmental disabilities between 2006 and 2008 than a decade earlier. During this time, the prevalence of autism climbed nearly 300 percent, while that of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder increased 33 percent. CDC figures also show that 10 to 15 percent of all babies born in the U.S. have some type of neurobehavorial development disorder. Still more are affected by neurological disorders that don't rise to the level of clinical diagnosis. And it's not just the U.S. Such impairments affect millions of children worldwide. The numbers are so large that Philippe Grandjean of the University of Southern Denmark and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Philip Landrigan of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York — both physicians and preeminent researchers in this field — describe the situation as a "pandemic." While ...
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Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health 20.2.2015 NPR: All Things Considered
The planes used to spray Agent Orange in Vietnam weren't retired from service — they were used by reservists in the U.S. for more than a decade after the war, exposing the crews to harmful chemicals.
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Despite Corporations Trying to Silence Our Voices, A New Wave of Democracy 18.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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A New Wave of Democracy, and How Corporations Are Trying to Silence Your Voice and Your Choice 18.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
President's Day is an appropriate time to reflect on the state of our U.S. democracy. And there is some very good news across the country about the spread of local democracy, but you have not heard or read much about it in the mainstream media. Remarkably, this democratic surge has taken place despite the massive influx of corporate dollars from those who want to stomp out popular rule as it threatens their power and profits. But more about them later. Let's start with the big positive. Too often democracy has meant voting every couple of years for a candidate that is "the lesser of two evils." But now, citizens and their representatives all across the country are voting directly on major social and technology issues that impact their families and neighborhoods. Often, they are saying no to technologies that will poison their water, destroy their land and biodiversity and threaten the health of their children and communities. One example is the issue of genetically engineered (GE) crops and foods. More ...
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State officials begin interviews in birth defect mystery 16.2.2015 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Nearly three years after nurse Sara Barron first sounded the alarm about a spike in rare birth defects in Central Washington, state health officials have begun interviewing area women who lost babies to the devastating condition known as anencephaly....
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USDA Approves ‘Untested, Inherently Risky’ GMO Apple 15.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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4 Strange Sources of Roundup 14.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
by guest blogger Leah Zerbe, online editor for RodaleNews.com There are a lot of studies asserting that organic is better for you, but if you read nothing else about it, know this: Many nonorganic foods contain dangerous levels of GMOs and glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup. You won't find it anywhere on the ingredients list, but this potent herbicide is a new staple of the modern American diet. Here are 4 strange places Roundup hides in your food supply: 1. Your cereal. GMO Free USA recently published lab testing detecting glyphosate in Kellogg's Froot Loops. But how is this happening? "Farmers are spray increasing amounts of glyphosate on their genetically modified crops that are engineered to tolerate the herbicide. As a result, glyphosate is seeping into both animal feed and human food," Ken Roseboro, author of the GMO Report, recently told me. These real-world levels of glyphosate have also been shown to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells. Kellogg's also pays big ...
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The Hidden Ways Manipulated Science Harms Our Health, From Measles To Organics 11.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The current outbreak of measles, the largest since the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. more than a decade ago, was made possible in large part by a single black mark in the medical research literature -- a discredited 1998 study from Dr. Andrew Wakefield that purported to link the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism. The Lancet, the journal in which Wakefield's study appeared, pulled the study after investigations by a British journalist and a medical panel uncovered cherry-picked data and an array of financial conflicts of interest , among other trappings of fraudulent science. Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist, had gone as far as to pay children at his son's birthday party to have their blood drawn for the research. He had also collected funds for his work from personal injury lawyers who represented parents seeking to sue vaccine makers. Despite the journal's retraction and Wakefield being stripped of his medical license in the U.K., the study still succeeded in ...
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Bees matter, so restricting neonics is the right thing to do 11.2.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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Shaking up the White House Hive 11.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As I spoke to a packed room at the EcoFarm Conference late last month, it was clear that many of us eagerly await the unveiling of the White House's new plan to protect bees. But if recent events are any indication, officials aren't getting the message that pesticides are a key part of the problem. Just one day before my talk, EPA approved another bee-harming pesticide. With this recent decision, it's time to shake up the White House hive. No, not the beehive near the Obamas' kitchen garden, but the politics that are blocking progress for the nation's pollinators. It's the White House Task Force on Pollinator Health that's releasing a new plan, and they really need to get it right. Scientific evidence very clearly links pesticides, especially persistent and systemic insecticides, to bee declines. And as the EPA documents , these chemicals aren't much help to farmers anyway. That's why EPA's approval of a so-called "safer" pesticide that's virtually identical to other bee-harming pesticides on the market ...
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Environmental Crimes 10.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
All civilized societies rely on laws for protection from crimes. I have no trouble detecting something bad, abhorrent, and criminal. When certain people or corporations do things that harm innocent people, they are committing a crime. I don't mean the acts of thieves, murderers and warmongers. Thieves, killers and warmongers are straightforward criminals. I mean the behavior of businessmen and their government regulators. I learned a few things about this class of people at EPA. My EPA work experience brought me in contact with environmental policies and acts verging on the criminal. I did not speak of crimes when I spoke to my colleagues. I let them explain to me why the government sometimes enforces a law, other times ignores another law. Or why is the government keeping silent when it knows pollution often contaminates and, therefore, poisons drinking water and the food people eat? I consider poisoning the water and food of millions the worst crime possible. Why, if I were right, no one ever spoke or ...
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