User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Sep 30 2014 23:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Blumenauer, Conyers, 58 Others Send Letter Urging EPA to Take Immediate Action to Protect Pollinators 30.9.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Winged Warnings: Built for Survival, Birds in Trouble From Pole to Pole 30.9.2014 Truthout.com
Sole descendents of the dinosaurs, birds have penetrated nearly every ecosystem on Earth and then tailored their own size, habits and colors to each one, pollinating, dispersing seeds, controlling bugs, cleaning up carrion and fertilizing plants, all the while singing notes so beguiling that hearing them makes even the urban dweller pause to listen. Birds are the planet’s superheroes, built for survival. But for all their superhuman powers, they are in trouble. Startled by a glacier calving, the black-legged kittiwakes took to the sky in a flurry of activity, St Jonsfjorden, Prins Karls Forland in Greenland. (Photo: Marie and Alistair Knock ) Truthout only exists thanks to the support of our readers. Help us continue to publish truly independent journalism by making a tax-deductible donation today! The ice of Antarctica doesn’t faze birds. Nor does the heat of the tropics. They thrive in the desert, in swamps, on the open ocean, on sheer rock faces, on treeless tundra, atop airless mountaintops and ...
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"Restricted use": right direction, but won't protect our kids and communities from toxic pesticide 25.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: When the average person hears that the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) is making chlorpyrifos a “restricted use” pesticide, they tend to think that it’s a good thing. And, in general, it is. But despite its impressive-sounding name, “restricted use”...
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Here's hope for the bees: A manifesto 24.9.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

The Honey Bee Health Coalition came together from all sectors to accelerate solutions to improve bee health. And they need you.

Here's hope for the bees: A manifesto
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Plan to disburse climate change funds challenged by Bay Area officials 24.9.2014 LA Times: Science
Bay Area public officials are challenging a state plan to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to fight climate change by cleaning the air in some of California's poorest and most polluted communities, most of which are in Southern California.
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2,4-D or not 2,4-D? That is EPA's question. 24.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Kristi Pullen, Staff Scientist, Washington, D.C.: There was an old lady who swallowed a fly – or so began one of my favorite songs from childhood.  An elderly woman, determined to rid herself of a pesky fly problem, starts out by swallowing a spider to catch...
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Can 'Prescriptive Evolution' Help Save Our World in the Anthropocene? 20.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Karla Renschler Is evolution about to get even more controversial? In an article in Science Express , the journal Science's forum for rapid publication of timely articles, a team of researchers makes a forceful argument for the use of "applied evolutionary biology"-the conscious manipulation and guidance of evolutionary processes in plants and animals -- in order to mitigate the negative impacts of human activity on the environment. With a growing population of over 7 billion, it is widely understood that human beings are significantly altering the global environment. Some scientists believe we've entered a new geological era -- the Anthropocene -- in which Earth is now dominated by human impacts. One of the most important and dangerous of these impacts is how human influences drive rapid evolutionary changes, in species ranging from bacteria and pathogens to plants, insects, and other animals. These changes are giving rise to enormous challenges in the fields of health, agriculture, natural resource ...
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Kids vs. Pesticides 20.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It is an idyllic childhood for children to grow up around farming. However, some farming uses conventional methods of agriculture that include the use of some harmful pesticides. Pesticides are not restricted to agriculture but may also be used on lawns in the suburbs and indoors especially in urban areas. While farming is an American staple, agriculture adjacent to schools with children is risky. Children depend on us as the "grown ups" to keep them safe. We all want children safe in schools, especially our neighbor the farmer who very likely has his or her children in the adjacent school. Farmers are especially challenged , as they may bring pesticides into their home through contaminated clothes, shoes or equipment and are faced with keeping their families safe in a way that many non-farmers may not recognize. There are no "bad guys" here, however unfortunate circumstances of positioning children near agricultural sites. While there are some less toxic chemicals, we certainly do not want our children ...
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Is Modern Technology Killing Us? 19.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles

An exploration of the social, cultural and environmental pitfalls of modern technology culminates in a proposed neo-Luddite framework for evaluating the risks and benefits of existing and emerging technologies.

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Hidden Source Of Industry Influence Threatens Toxic Chemical Regulations 19.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SEATTLE -- Dr. Raymond Neutra adopted an alternate persona as he stepped up to the podium on a sunny, late-August afternoon. Sporting a hat and a fake British accent, the respected authority on environmental health transformed into the fictitious Reginald Charlston, LL.D., of the corporate law firm Dewy, Charlston and Howe. Speaking to a crowd at the University of Washington, Neutra's character proceeded to explain how he hired scientists to help his chemical industry clients "cast doubt" on "inconvenient truths" regarding the safety of their products. The goal: reinforce roadblocks to verdicts and regulations that could otherwise threaten those corporations' bottom lines. "I was originally going to represent Dewy, Cheatem and Howe," Neutra, former chief of California's Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control, told The Huffington Post after his address, given at the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology conference. "But my wife thought that was going too far." The ...
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USDA's Greenlighting of 'Agent Orange' Crops Sparks Condemnation 18.9.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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USDA approves new modified corn, soybean seeds 18.9.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer.
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USDA approves new modified corn, soybean seeds 18.9.2014 Yahoo: Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer.
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USDA approves new modified corn, soybean seeds 18.9.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer.
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USDA approves new modified corn, soybean seeds 18.9.2014 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer....
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Neonicotinoid pesticides - bad for bees, and may be bad for people too 18.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Jennifer Sass, Senior Scientist, Washington, D.C.: While public attention has recently focused on the threat to honey bees and bumble bees from neonicotinoid (neonic) pesticides, there is growing evidence that another species may be a risk from these pervasive chemicals—humans. Many scientists now say that exposure...
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Some good news — and a bunch of bad news — on pesticide levels in U.S. streams 16.9.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Katy Silberger Much of the pesticide load in the environment comes from large-scale farming. I am ever on the lookout for news of improving environmental quality, and so was drawn to the New York Times report last Friday headlined, "Pesticide Levels in Waterways have Dropped, Reducing the Risks to Humans." Well. That's one way of looking at it, I guess. The article, by the admirable Michael Wines, dealt even-handedly if somewhat swiftly with a set of scientific findings on trend lines in pesticide sampling that are — as you might well imagine, given the subject matter — quite complex. And not so encouraging overall, by my reading. The analysis was prepared by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey , which monitors pesticide levels in a shifting set of about 200 streams and rivers around the country. This particular report compared the results of sampling conducted in two different decades, 1992-2001 and 2002-2011, and looked at overall trends between those periods. It was published last week ...
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Four Ways Industrial Ag Is Destroying the Soil - and Your Health 14.9.2014 Truthout.com
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Man-Made Evolution Is Happening -- It's Time to Control It 14.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Alison Hewitt, UCLA Newsroom Evolutionary biologists have news for anyone accustomed to thinking of evolution as a long-term proposition: Evolution also takes place on a day-to-day basis, and it's a tool we must use to keep drug-resistant diseases from spiraling out of control and to prevent mass extinctions. In a paper published Sept. 11, UCLA evolutionary biologist Thomas Smith and colleagues from seven other universities explain that pests and diseases are evolving too quickly, while people and endangered species are evolving too slowly. The article , which appears in the online version of the journal Science, calls for policy makers and industry leaders to use the principles of applied evolutionary biology to solve global challenges in agriculture, medicine, conservation and other fields. The paper had its roots in a 2007 conference at UCLA that was organized in part by Smith, who is director of the UCLA Center for Tropical Research , a member of UCLA's Institute of the Environment and ...
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Suicide Is A Big Problem Where You'd Least Expect It 11.9.2014 NPR News
The conventional thinking is that suicide is a problem in high-income countries. But a new WHO report says that three-fourths of suicide deaths are in the low- and middle-income world.
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