User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Sep 16 2014 21:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Some good news — and a bunch of bad news — on pesticide levels in U.S. streams 16.9.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Katy Silberger Much of the pesticide load in the environment comes from large-scale farming. I am ever on the lookout for news of improving environmental quality, and so was drawn to the New York Times report last Friday headlined, "Pesticide Levels in Waterways have Dropped, Reducing the Risks to Humans." Well. That's one way of looking at it, I guess. The article, by the admirable Michael Wines, dealt even-handedly if somewhat swiftly with a set of scientific findings on trend lines in pesticide sampling that are — as you might well imagine, given the subject matter — quite complex. And not so encouraging overall, by my reading. The analysis was prepared by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey , which monitors pesticide levels in a shifting set of about 200 streams and rivers around the country. This particular report compared the results of sampling conducted in two different decades, 1992-2001 and 2002-2011, and looked at overall trends between those periods. It was published last week ...
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Four Ways Industrial Ag Is Destroying the Soil - and Your Health 14.9.2014 Truthout.com
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Man-Made Evolution Is Happening -- It's Time to Control It 14.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Alison Hewitt, UCLA Newsroom Evolutionary biologists have news for anyone accustomed to thinking of evolution as a long-term proposition: Evolution also takes place on a day-to-day basis, and it's a tool we must use to keep drug-resistant diseases from spiraling out of control and to prevent mass extinctions. In a paper published Sept. 11, UCLA evolutionary biologist Thomas Smith and colleagues from seven other universities explain that pests and diseases are evolving too quickly, while people and endangered species are evolving too slowly. The article , which appears in the online version of the journal Science, calls for policy makers and industry leaders to use the principles of applied evolutionary biology to solve global challenges in agriculture, medicine, conservation and other fields. The paper had its roots in a 2007 conference at UCLA that was organized in part by Smith, who is director of the UCLA Center for Tropical Research , a member of UCLA's Institute of the Environment and ...
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Suicide Is A Big Problem Where You'd Least Expect It 11.9.2014 NPR News
The conventional thinking is that suicide is a problem in high-income countries. But a new WHO report says that three-fourths of suicide deaths are in the low- and middle-income world.
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New Lawsuit Urges EPA to (Finally) Ban Neurotoxic Pesticide 11.9.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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You Need to Know: What Colony Collapse Means for Our Food Supply 10.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The ultimate who-done-it of our time is not a scandalous political act or John Grisham plot line, but the story of honey bees. 40 percent of bee colonies vanished during the winter of 2006 , and another 36 percent departed the winter after . Why? Years later, there is still no clear answer, but what we do know is that honey bees are essential for the continued functioning of our food system. Here is all you need to know about what's happening to the United States honey bee population. Why do we care about bees? The UN Food and Agriculture Organization has estimated that "out of some 100 crop species which provide 90 percent of food worldwide, 71 of these are bee-pollinated." Some say bees are responsible for one out of every three bites of food we eat. Bee pollination work is worth $365 billion each year . So what's happening to the bees? They are dying. A lot. And it's bad. Beginning in 2006, record numbers of honeybees began dying during the winter months. It is common to lose roughly ten to fifteen ...
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A night at the bat house: Rehder Ranch serves as ground zero for bat research in Northwest Colorado 7.9.2014 Steamboat Pilot
As the sky grows dark above an old and empty ranch house near Lake Catamount, Rob Schorr and his team of researchers switch on their headlamps and start listening for the screeches. In a few minutes, dozens and dozens of little brown bats will start to fly out of the attic. The researchers want to catch as many of them as they can. A few minutes before the bats start to stir, Jeremy Siemers is making some final adjustments on his laptop computer on the front porch as Schorr and helpers Justin Unrein and Carli Baum are carefully positioning a large aluminum frame that is filled with what looks like harp strings near the front door of the house. To someone who isn’t briefed about this nocturnal research, it may appear as though Schorr and the team are auditioning to be in a future “Ghostbusters” movie. But in about 30 minutes, the researchers will have bags full of bats. Most bats that try to fly though the harp trap will get sucked down into a plastic bag and carefully picked up by the researchers. But ...
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How can we make lawns more environmentally friendly? 6.9.2014 Environmental News Network
Many homeowners strive to have the picture-perfect green lawn. But how can that be achieved in an environment where water in parts of the country is becoming scarce and the use of pesticides and fertilizer is being discouraged? Researchers from two Big Ten universities hope that they will be able to find an answer. Scientists from Rutgers University and the University of Minnesota, both members of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation – an academic consortium of Big Ten universities – will be working together over the next five years to develop an environmentally friendly grass that is more resistant to disease and drought and a better economical choice for homeowners.
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Colorado researchers probe Parkinson's disease causes, treatments 1.9.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
The corn rows are high and tassled, pumpkins are gaining girth and, amid these signs the fall harvest is near, evidence is growing that farmers and others who live or work around pesticides are at greater risk for neurogenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
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Pesticides on the Playground 31.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Pesticides on the Playground 31.8.2014 Truthout.com
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Hillary Clinton is Just Plain Wrong on GMOs 29.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Defang Agriculture 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
At the end of book XXII of Homer's "Odyssey," we read that Odysseus fumigated his house with sulphur. This was sometimes in the 1200s BCE. More than three thousand years later, in the 1950s and 1960s, my father used sulphur to protect his grape vines from disease. Thus "pesticides" have a long history. But despite my vague knowledge of my father's rare use of sulphur in his small farm in Greece, I never thought about pesticides. They were things one used in emergencies. All this changed dramatically when I joined the US Environmental Protection Agency in 1979. My position was with the very organization that "regulates" pesticides in America, EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs. My colleagues made it easy for me to learn quickly. They explained what they did and gave me samples of their written work. Talking to my colleagues and reading their papers opened the secret world of pesticides to me. Many modern pesticides are chemicals from chlorine and petroleum. Pesticides received a tremendous boost from ...
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Reading, Writing, and ...Toxic Pesticides? 27.8.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Miriam Rotkin-Ellman, Scientist, San Francisco: Parents worry about plenty of things when they send their kids to school: first- day jitters, making friends, bullying … But exposure to toxic chemicals isn’t usually on the list of “back to school” worries. Perhaps it should be, though....
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Kauaʻi residents and community leaders respond to federal court ruling in lawsuit by chemical companies: “This Battle is Far From Over” 26.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Chlorpyrifos: Banned for Most Americans, Farmworkers and Their Children Left Behind 23.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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What's Holding Back the Organic Food and Farming Revolution 23.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Santa Clara County: Fogging concerns outweighed by virus risk, according to reports 22.8.2014 San Jose Mercury News: San Jose/Valley
Responding out an outbreak of concerns about mosquito fogging during a buzzing West Nile season, Santa Clara County officials on Thursday heard staff reports outlining why they believe the dangers posed by the virus outweigh any potential pesticide threat.
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Despite Progress, Long Fight Ahead to Protect Rare Wildlife From Pesticides 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hardly news that many of the more than 18,000 pesticide products approved for use in this country have been linked to cancer and other severe health effects in humans. Indeed, more than one billion pounds of pesticides are dumped on the North American landscape every year. Some chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors , interfere with the natural hormones in our bodies that regulate reproduction, brain function and immune response, and may be linked to increased risk for developmental and reproductive problems in both humans and wildlife. Despite the well-documented risks, the U.S. has continued to allow the widespread use of these chemicals, even while they've been banned in other countries. The European Union, for example, has outlawed atrazine , a widely used weed-killer in the U.S. that is also a common contaminant of drinking water and may be linked to increased risk of birth defects in people , frogs and fish . That chemicals remain in widespread use despite known risks reflects serious cracks ...
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Herbicide Use To Increase Dramatically 15.8.2014 Environmental News Network
The US is poised to 'deregulate' GMO corn, soybean and cotton varieties resistant to the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba. The result will be a big increase in the use of those herbicides, as high as 600%. Only a huge public outcry can now stop the GMO-herbicide juggernaut. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued its final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and proposed approval for new GMO corn and soybean varieties genetically engineered to be resistant to the toxic herbicide 2,4-D.
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