User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Apr 19 2017 17:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump Has Okayed a Pesticide That Terrifies These Families 19.4.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. A white cloud of pesticides had drifted into Fidelia Morales's back yard, coating her children's swing set. The 40-year-old mother of five gestured toward the citrus groves that surround her house in California's Central Valley as she recounted when an air blast sprayer sent chemicals floating onto her property last year – landing on her family's red and blue jungle gym. "We know this is dangerous for the kids, but what are we supposed to do?" she said on a recent afternoon, speaking in Spanish through a translator. Morales said she fears that these kinds of drifts, as well as long-term exposure to a variety of chemicals in the air, have hurt her children, ages 9 to 20, who have struggled to focus in school and have suffered from bronchitis, asthma and other chronic illnesses. Under Barack Obama, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an agricultural ban on chlorpyrifos, ...
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6 Ways Trump's Administration Could Literally Make America More Toxic 17.4.2017 Mother Jones
In late March, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide commonly used to ward off insects on fruit and vegetable crops, was nearing the end of a decade-long review process. There's strong evidence suggesting that the insecticide inhibits kids' brain development, and at least 80,000 scientists, environmentalists, and members of the public had signed a petition urging the Environmental Protection Agency to ban the stuff outright. But in the final stages of review, EPA director Scott Pruitt greenlighted the chemical instead , arguing there was insufficient evidence to ban it. Now farmers can continue to apply it to crops like corn, strawberries, almonds, and tomatoes. This year, more controversial pesticides are due for agency review, a process that weighs the latest scientific findings with public comment to determine whether the substance can continue to be used—though the White House has the final say. These reviews often lag for many years. And Trump's EPA, with its anti-regulatory bent and a new administrator plucked ...
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Groups to Probe Why Pruitt Put ''Pesticide Industry Profits Ahead of Children's Health" 13.4.2017 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Andrea Germanos, staff writer

How is it that Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt came to the decision to reject his own agency's science and reject a ban the insecticide chlorpyrifos?

Watchdog group American Oversight and advocacy organization Environmental Working Group (EWG) want to know, and are ready to sue to get to the bottom of the matter.

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Non-Profits Sue Monsanto Over Misleading Labeling of Popular Herbicide Roundup 13.4.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Environmental Organizations

Two nonprofit organizations filed a lawsuit against Monsanto for misleading the public by labeling its popular weedkiller Roundup as “target[ing] an enzyme found in plants but not in people or pets.” This lawsuit claims this statement is false, deceptive, and misleading, because the enzyme targeted by glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is, in fact, found in people and pets.

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Fungal pesticides offer a growing alternative to traditional chemicals 12.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The rise of organic produce has sparked a new interest in using biopesticides like fungi to kill insects, instead of traditional synthetic ones. But they are still just a tiny segment of the market.
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American Oversight and EWG Demand Release of Pruitt Communications with Pesticide Industry 12.4.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Environmental Working Group (EWG) American Oversight and the Environmental Working Group today launched a joint investigation into the March 29 decision by the Environmental Protection Agency not to ban the pesticide chlorpyrifos. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt rejected the findings of the agency's own experts as well as the broader scientific community, which had concluded that chlorpyrifos poses a risk of nervous system damage and birth defects in ...
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Fungal Pesticides Offer A Growing Alternative To Traditional Chemicals 12.4.2017 NPR News
The rise of organic produce has sparked a new interest in using biopesticides like fungi to kill insects, instead of traditional synthetic ones. But they are still just a tiny segment of the market.
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Why did Scott Pruitt refuse to ban a chemical that the EPA itself said is dangerous? 12.4.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Here are the politics of the insecticide Chlorpyrifos.
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Pruitt's Rejection of Chlorpyrifos Ban Seems Based on "Alternative Facts" 9.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
EPA chief Scott Pruitt fails to explain what data prompted his decision to allow continued use of toxic pesticides. (Photo: Pixabay ) The US Environmental Protection Agency under President Trump may have stepped into the brave new world of alternative facts. Last November, after several years of study, the EPA had  announced  that the insecticide chlorpyrifos poses an unacceptable risk to humans, especially children, when its residue is found in fruits, vegetables, and drinking water. The finding cited a 2014  Columbia University study  and other research showing that young people have suffered diminished cognitive abilities and reduced IQ after chronic exposures. This led the EPA to recommend a ban on all agricultural uses of chlorpyrifos -- by far the most heavily used insecticide in the US with  4 to 8 million pounds applied annually . On a pounds per acre basis, the  heaviest applications of chlorpyrifos  in the US have been on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, where several large agribusiness have been ...
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Environmental Groups Take Trump EPA To Court To Force Ban Of Brain-Draining Pesticide 7.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Three environmental organizations have asked a federal appeals court to force the Environmental Protection Agency to ban a widely used pesticide  linked to brain damage  in children. A motion  filed Wednesday by Earthjustice  on behalf of two other organizations challenges EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s decision last week to reject the scientific findings of his own agency and allow chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate insecticide used on fruits, vegetables and nuts, to remain on the market for agricultural use. The groups asked the court to require EPA to ban the pesticide within 30 days. Patti Goldman, an Earthjustice attorney, told The Huffington Post that the Trump administration is failing to protect the public from a chemical its own scientists found to be dangerous. “If the head of the EPA isn’t respecting, following the law or the science, that will be of great concern across the board,” Goldman said.  Earthjustice is representing the Natural Resources Defense Council  and the ...
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Moms Exposed To Monsanto Weed Killer Means Bad Outcomes For Babies 5.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Concerns about the world’s most widely used herbicide are taking a new twist as researchers unveil data that indicates pervasive use of Monsanto Co.’s weed killer could be linked to pregnancy problems. Researchers looking at exposure to the herbicide known as glyphosate , the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup-branded herbicides, said they tested and tracked 69 expectant mothers and found that the presence of glyphosate levels in their bodily fluids correlated with unfavorable birth outcomes. The research is still in preliminary stages and the sample size is small, but t he team is scheduled to present their findings on Thursday at a conference put on by the Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN) in Washington, D.C. “This is a huge issue,” said Paul Winchester, medical director of the neonatal intensive care unit at the Franciscan St. Francis Health system and professor of clinical pediatrics at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, Indiana. He said this is the first U.S. study to ...
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PAN Takes EPA Back to Court Over Brain-Harming Pesticide 5.4.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA) Today, Pesticide Action Network (PAN) and partners are taking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) back to court over the widely-used pesticide chlorpyrifos. Last week, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced that the agency was reversing course on a planned withdrawal of the chemical, ignoring the findings and recommendations of the agency’s own ...
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Glyphosate: Health Concerns About the Most Widely Used Pesticide 5.4.2017 Truthout.com
Glyphosate is a synthetic herbicide patented in 1974 by the Monsanto Company, and now manufactured and sold by many companies in hundreds of products around the world. Glyphosate is best known as the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup branded herbicides. Here are some key facts about glyphosate: Most Widely Used Pesticide  According to a February 2016 study in  Environmental Sciences Europe , glyphosate is the  most widely used pesticide . "In the US, no pesticide has come remotely close to such intensive and widespread use," according to the study. Findings include: Americans have applied 1.8 million tons of glyphosate since its introduction in 1974. Worldwide 9.4 million tons of the chemical has been sprayed on fields -- enough to spray nearly half a pound of Roundup on every cultivated acre of land in the world. Globally, glyphosate use has risen almost 15-fold since so-called "Roundup Ready," genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crops were introduced in 1996. Cancer Concerns  In 2015, the ...
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First evidence found of popular farm pesticides in drinking water 5.4.2017 Washington Post
First evidence found of popular farm pesticides in drinking water
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Senator Demands More Info About EPA Chief’s Refusal To Ban Brain-Damaging Pesticide 4.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Sen.  Tom Carper (D-Del.) has requested all documents related to  Environmental Protection Agency  Administrator Scott Pruitt ’s decision to go against the scientific recommendation of his own agency and refuse to ban a widely used pesticide that’s been  linked to learning disabilities  in children. In a Friday letter  to Pruitt, Carper, a ranking member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works , said he is “troubled” by the agency chief’s order  to allow  chlorpyrifos , an organophosphate insecticide that’s been used since the 1960s, to remain on the market for agricultural use. Pruitt “did not present any new scientific or legal analysis” to justify the decision, Carper noted. “The previous finding to ban chlorpyrifos was based on extensive data, models and research developed by industry, government and academic scientists,” Carper wrote. “Absent such justification, this decision to lift the proposed ban could undermine the trust the public has in the agency to keep its ...
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EPA Chief's Refusal To Ban Brain-Damaging Pesticide Shows Profit Trumps Public Safety 31.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — Defying the recommendation of his own agency’s scientists,  Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt  has refused to ban a widely used pesticide that’s been  linked to learning disabilities in children. Pruitt’s order , signed late Wednesday , allows  chlorpyrifos , an organophosphate insecticide that’s been used on crops from broccoli to cranberries since the 1960s, to remain on the market for agricultural use. The EPA proposed in November 2015 under the Obama administration to permanently ban the chemical on food crops, citing potential risks to human health. The move stemmed from a 2007 petition filed by the Natural Resources Defense Council  and the Pesticide Action Network North America .   Critics on Thursday condemned Pruitt and President Donald Trump  for showing they value corporate profits over public health. The move, less than two months after Pruitt was confirmed as the nation’s top environmental officer, signals far looser regulation of harmful substances ...
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EPA Rejects Own Science to Greenlight Brain-Damaging Pesticide 30.3.2017 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head Scott Pruitt denied a 10-year-old petition late Wednesday to ban the use of chlorpyrifos, a widely-used pesticide that harms children's brains, in a decision that outraged public health advocates and environmentalists.

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Trump EPA declines to ban pesticide that Obama had proposed outlawing 30.3.2017 Washington Post
Farmers have long used the chemical compound chlorpyrifos to kill pests on crops, but critics say it poses health risks for children. The chemical industry had pushed hard against a chlorpyrifos ban, and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt agreed.
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Will Trump's EPA Greenlight a Pesticide Known to Damage Kids' Brains? 28.3.2017 Mother Jones
By Friday, President Donald Trump's Environmental Protection Agency will have to make a momentous decision: whether to protect kids from a widely used pesticide that's known to harm their brains—or protect the interests of the chemical's maker, Dow AgroSciences. The pesticide in question, chlorpyrifos, is a nasty piece of work. It's an organophosphate, a class of bug killers that work by "interrupting the electrochemical processes that nerves use to communicate with muscles and with other nerves," as the Pesticide Encyclopedia puts it . Chlorpyrifos is also an endocrine disrupter , meaning it can cause "adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects," according to the National Institutes of Health. Major studies from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine , the University of California-Davis , and Columbia University have found strong evidence that low doses of chlorpyrifos inhibits kids' brain development, including when exposure occurs in the womb, with effects ranging from lower IQ ...
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Unbeelieveable: Stung By Lawsuit, Trump Administration Lists Bumble Bee As Endangered 22.3.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — The rusty patched bumble bee , one of America’s most important pollinators, has finally landed on the endangered species list . It becomes  the first bumble bee  — and the first of any bee species in the contiguous United States — to receive federal protections. “ The Trump administration reversed course and listed the rusty patched bumble bee as an endangered species just in the nick of time,” Rebecca Riley, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a statement Tuesday. “Federal protections may be the only thing standing between the bumble bee and extinction.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in January  listed  the bee as endangered, citing population declines caused by the loss of habitat, disease, pesticide use and climate change. But before the protections took effect, the listing was frozen  until March 21 as part of a sweeping executive order by President Donald Trump that imposed a 60-day waiting period on new regulations.  The NRDC responded by suing the ...
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