User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Jul 30 2015 20:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pesticides Are Killing Greece’s Bees: Honey Industry Suffers Amid Broader Economic Turmoil 30.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
   Even as unemployed Greek youth turn in desperation to beekeeping, Greece’s honey industry is suffering the effects of systemic pesticides. More than 1,000 studies confirm that pesticides disorient the bees, making it more difficult for them to navigate, forage for pollen and reproduce in the hives. The hot topic across global financial markets at the moment is Greece. People there are experiencing monetary woes, but it seems like their honeybees aren't doing too well either. Systemic pesticides are increasingly causing bee losses, and many would argue that the country now suffers from colony collapse disorder as well. The air smells of smoke and lemons, and the cicadas chirp steadily as I come upon 16 beehives clustered together in a dry field. What I've just discovered is mere steps away from Demokritos, the National Centre for Scientific Research in Athens, the largest multidisciplinary research institute in Greece. Every so often, pagoda, pine and olive trees sway gently in the breeze, but overall ...
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To Save Bees, Some States Take Aim At Pesticides 29.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily reporting and analysis on trends in state policy. The orange groves in Fort Myers, Florida, have turned to poison for David Mendes’ honeybees. The onetime winter havens for bees have been treated with a popular pesticide that he says kills his livelihood. States and the federal government are searching for ways to protect managed bees like Mendes’ and their wild counterparts. The White House issued a strategy in May to promote the health of honeybees and at least 24 states have enacted laws to protect bees and other pollinators such as bats, birds and butterflies. Of the 100 crops that supply about 90 percent of the food for most of the world, 71 are pollinated by bees. Pollination has a direct effect on the quality of food and the diversity of crops. Declines in bee populations mean fruit and vegetables are less available and more expensive. Though the number ...
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Trying to Stop Another Nanosilver Pesticide 28.7.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Mae Wu, Program Attorney, Washington, DC: Yogi Berra said it best: It's like déjà vu, all over again. The Environmental Protection Agency is again giving a nanosilver pesticide product a conditional registration, despite not having all the toxicity data it needs to assess its potential harm...
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Understanding the Controversy and Science of GMOs 28.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Nirvana Abou-Gabal The subject of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) is one of the most hotly-debated food and environmental topics in the world today. Just look at the response to Chipotle's recent announcement that the chain would cease to include GMO ingredients on its menu. Health advocates applauded the move as a step in the right direction on the heels of Whole Foods' 2013 commitment to label all genetically-modified products in its stores by 2018 . Detractors called it yet another example of a food maker using unsubstantiated claims to sell food and hypocritical , given that the chain will continue to serve soda, which contains high-fructose corn syrup made with genetically-modified corn. Related: 4 Things That Affect Weight That Have Little to Do with Food At the crux of the controversy are a number of unknowns about the long-term health effects of ingesting genetically-modified (GM) foods and the impact these plants and accompanying farming methods have on the environment. With some ...
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Ruthless Power and Deleterious Politics: From DDT to Roundup 27.7.2015 Truthout.com
Farm equipment sprays glysophate onto crops. (Photo: Chafer Machinery ) Do you want media that's accountable to YOU, not to corporate sponsors? Help publish journalism with real integrity and independence - click here to donate to Truthout! Morton Biskind, a physician from Westport, Connecticut, was a courageous man. At the peak of the cold war, in 1953, he complained of maladies afflicting both domestic animals and people for the first time. He concluded that the popular insect poison DDT was the agent of their disease. DDT, he said, was "dangerous for all animal life from insects to mammals." The Reign of DDT Yet, he was astonished at what little was done to restrict or ban DDT. On the contrary, officials and scientists defended it: "[V]irtually the entire apparatus of communication, lay and scientific alike, has been devoted to denying, concealing, suppressing, distorting… [the bad news about DDT]. Libel, slander and economic boycott have not been overlooked… And a new principle of toxicology has… ...
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House Votes to Keep Americans in Dark on Food, Passes Industry’s 'DARK Act' 25.7.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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House Votes to Keep Americans in Dark on Food, Passes Sndustry’s 'DARK Act' 25.7.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Veterans Exposed To Toxic Chemicals Accuse VA Of Foot-Dragging 21.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Retired Senior Master Sgt. Leslie Howe has battled two cancers -- non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prostate cancer, both of which have been linked with exposure to Agent Orange , the herbicide used by the U.S. military to destroy enemy cover and crops during the Vietnam War. Howe, 71, was never actually in Vietnam during the conflict, but in the 1980s he served aboard Air Force planes that contained trace amounts of the defoliant . Still, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs twice denied Howe's benefits claim, telling him in a letter that it "could not find a link" between his medical conditions and his military service. "I flew in good conscience on that aircraft, not knowing the danger," said Howe, who recalled a distinct "aroma" at times while he worked in the aircraft as an air medical evacuation technician. "I did it because I wanted to serve my country." C-123 veterans reunited in early 2014: Senior Master Sgt. Leslie Howe (back left), Master Sgt. Richard Matte (front center), Lt. Col. Mary ...
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New marijuana industry wrestles with pesticides and safety 20.7.2015 AP Washington
DENVER (AP) -- Microscopic bugs and mildew can destroy a marijuana operation faster than any police raid. And because the crop has been illegal for so long, neither growers nor scientists have any reliable research to help fight the infestations....
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New marijuana industry wrestles with pesticides and safety 20.7.2015 Yahoo: US National
DENVER (AP) — Microscopic bugs and mildew can destroy a marijuana operation faster than any police raid. And because the crop has been illegal for so long, neither growers nor scientists have any reliable research to help fight the ...
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Water Quality Impaired by Agricultural Runoff in Panama and US 16.7.2015 Truthout.com
Failures of past Panamanian governments to effectively regulate farming and to consider the broad, and often deleterious, effects of chemicals being used in agriculture have significantly impaired water quality in rural regions of Panama. Poor management and minimal regulation of pesticides and herbicides can profoundly contribute to water pollution from agricultural runoff. Because Panama's policies have not effectively addressed the problem of agricultural runoff, the nation is facing public health issues tied to persistent water pollution. Agricultural Causes In Panama, toxic pesticides often enter and pollute bodies of water used for drinking, cooking and other domestic tasks. For example, residents of the rural town of Vallecito obtain some of their water from springs that are exposed to "runoff contamination by animal feces, fertilizer and pesticides." They also use water from private land where the owner "plans to use pesticides in the near future."[ 1 ] These current and hazardous exposures are ...
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Can The Agent Orange Act Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas? 16.7.2015 NPR: Morning Edition
Just like World War II vets who were exposed to mustard gas during secret chemical testing, Vietnam vets exposed to Agent Orange had trouble obtaining VA benefits — until they got the law changed.
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The True Cost of Cheap Food 16.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Organic, GMO, pesticide-free, fair-trade -- what do these really mean, are they just trends and how do they affect our planet? Agriculture is a complex industry which to some extent we are all reliant upon. Understandably, for decades the focus has been on how to increase crop yield more efficiently and cheaper. At first glance, this seems intuitive. And in large measures the agricultural industry has been able to accomplish this through the widespread use of pesticides and genetically modified crops that are resistant to pests and other external factors. But does more equal better? The evidence suggests not. We have sacrificed nutrition for quantity, and we are now ingesting chemicals into our bodies that we were never meant to. In 1974 Monsanto patented glyphosate as an herbicide, aka Roundup, which revolutionized farming practices and as such the use of the herbicide has grown exponentially. This has had not only a profound impact on the food we eat, but also on all the natural support systems that ...
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The Story of the Birds and the Bees: The Neonic Catastrophe That Never Was 16.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Like the fictional parents in the edgy comedy show South Park who blame Canada for all of their woes, environmentals often coalesce around an issue and then come up with a simple but sometimes simplistic narrative to anchor their advocacy. We've seen that with fracking, which is often blamed for massive groundwater pollution (the EPA has rejected that claim) and methane gas release ( rejected by numerous independent researchers). The decades long decline in the global frog population is often blamed on atrazine, although the decline is mostly occurring where atrazine is not used, and recent study by the leading anti-atrazine crusader has now found that exposure to atrazine made zero difference in frog health. Let's call it the environmental crisis narrative. Empirical evidence rarely stops memes from flooding the Internet, filling up environmental blogs and showing up in letters appealing for donations to support causes built around an impending ecological reckoning. Scare stories work. This is certainly ...
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Citing Big Ag Research, EU Set to Approve Toxic Weedkiller 15.7.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Food Smart Cities: Join the Food Revolution 15.7.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Ignoring troubling data, California closes the book on toxic pesticide water contamination 9.7.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: In a surprising move this week, California officials closed their reevaluation of the toxic pesticide chlorpyrifos in state waterways, concluding that their recent designation of chlorpyrifos as "restricted use" would solve water contamination problems just days after these new rules...
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Bees are stressed out! Scientists say climate change is part of the problem. 9.7.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Jennifer Sass, Senior Scientist, Washington, D.C.: Both wild bees and honeybees are being pummeled by stressors that can act alone or together to pack a powerful and even deadly punch. Now a study in the journal Science by an international team of fourteen scientific experts has...
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Dow Told to Shelve Herbicide Threatening to Push Monarchs Over the Brink In New York Times Ad 7.7.2015 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) placed an ad in The New York Times today to increase the pressure on Dow Chemical to “end this chemical arms race” against nature by shelving its toxic herbicide, Enlist Duo,  which imperils the iconic monarch butterfly. 
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Tell DOW Chemical to "end this chemical arms race" 7.7.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Sylvia Fallon, Senior Scientist, Washington, DC: If you've been following the plight of the monarch butterfly you know that glyphosate - commonly known as Round Up - is responsible for contributing to the dramatic decline in monarch butterflies by eliminating milkweed, the one plant the monarchs...
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