User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Jan 31 2015 04:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Moms and Doctors Have a Message for Monsanto: 'You're Making Us Sick' 30.1.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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ADHD linked to pesticide exposure 29.1.2015 Environmental News Network
A commonly used pesticide may alter the development of the brain’s dopamine system -- responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function – and increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, according to a new Rutgers study.Mice exposed to a commonly used pesticide in utero and through lactation exhibited several features of ADHD, including dysfunctional dopamine signaling in the brain, hyperactivity, working memory, attention deficits and impulsive-like behavior.The research published Wednesday in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), by Rutgers scientists and colleagues from Emory University, the University of Rochester Medical Center, and Wake Forest University discovered that mice exposed to the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in utero and through lactation exhibited several features of ADHD, including dysfunctional dopamine signaling in the brain, hyperactivity, working memory, attention deficits and impulsive-like ...
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Safer Strawberries Or False Choices? 28.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
California officials appear poised to make a decision that would spell safer strawberry fields and spur farmer innovation away from hazardous chemicals and towards safer solutions. That is, if pesticide proponents don't get in the way. After months of delay and years of review, next Friday the state plans to release a new series of "mitigations" (government speak for "protections") for the difficult-to-control fumigant pesticide called chloropicrin. And after a prolonged public hearing and comment process, the adequacy of these protections -- from no-spray buffer zones to public disclosure issues -- will be under intense scrutiny. Pesticide proponents, including the chemical's manufacturers, are pressing officials to choose between monitoring and notification for chloropicrin applied near homes, schools and workplaces. This would leave California's rural communities, farmworkers and policymakers with partial information: either notice in advance of when and where a pesticide might be applied, or data on ...
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Can Whole Foods' Responsibly Grown certification change mainstream farming? 26.1.2015 TreeHugger
From energy use to labor rights, Responsibly Grown helps broaden our idea of responsible farming—even for organics.
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'Seedy Business': New Report Digs Beneath Agrichemical Industry's High-Cost PR Machine 21.1.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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6 reasons to remove your shoes inside 19.1.2015 TreeHugger
From harboring hitchhiking bacteria to tracking in toxins, here’s why you may want to leave your kicks at the door.
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EPA Report Finds Pesticide Poses Risk to Workers, Spurs Calls for Ban 19.1.2015 Truthout - All Articles
An insecticide used on corn and other U.S. crops poses health risks to workers who mix and apply it and also can contaminate drinking water, according to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report released this week. The report is an update, based on new research, to a 2011 assessment of the health impacts of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (pronounced KLOR – pie -ra – phos), which remains one of the most commonly applied organophosphate pesticides. It has been banned for more than a decade for household use but is still used commercially on corn, soybeans, fruit and nut trees and some golf courses. The findings may mean more restrictions to protect worker's health and drinking water sources as the pesticide undergoes its registration review, a licensing process required of pesticides by the EPA. Industry maintains chlorpyrifos is safe at levels currently in the environment and greatly benefits farmers. But some environmental organizations say that increasing restrictions will not do enough to protect ...
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Mystery kidney disease killing Sri Lankan farmers 19.1.2015 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
Karunawathie isn't hungry for breakfast. She rarely is these days, but she forces herself to choke down a few bites of rice, dried fish and a simple coconut mix. The doctors say it's better to have something in her stomach before the four-hour dialysis treatments.
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How the People Can Outwit the Global Domination Plans of Agribusiness 18.1.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Mystery kidney disease killing Sri Lankan farmers 18.1.2015 AP Top News
KONKETIYAWA, Sri Lanka (AP) -- Karunawathie isn't hungry for breakfast. She rarely is these days, but she forces herself to choke down a few bites of rice, dried fish and a simple coconut mix. The doctors say it's better to have something in her stomach before the four-hour dialysis treatments....
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Mystery kidney disease killing Sri Lankan farmers 18.1.2015 World
KONKETIYAWA, Sri Lanka (AP) — Karunawathie isn't hungry for breakfast. She rarely is these days, but she forces herself to choke down a few bites of rice, dried fish and a simple coconut mix. The doctors say it's better to have something in her stomach before the four-hour dialysis treatments.
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Questions and answers about Sri Lanka mystery kidney disease 18.1.2015 AP Top News
KONKETIYAWA, Sri Lanka (AP) -- A mystery kidney disease is killing Sri Lankan farmers. The first cases surfaced some two decades ago in the country's North Central province, the main rice-producing area. Since then, the disease has killed up to an estimated 20,000 people on the Indian Ocean island nation. As researchers work to unravel the cause, and doctors continue to diagnose new patients, here are a few questions and answers about the illness....
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Mystery kidney killer spreads fear in Sri Lanka 18.1.2015 AP Top News
RAJANGANAYA, Sri Lanka (AP) -- It's midmorning and hundreds of people are squeezed under a banyan tree's shady canopy to have blood drawn by just three nurses, working assembly-line fast. Others wait outside this dusty rural health center to get their vitals taken and give urine samples....
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Kidney killer baffles scientists, breeds fear among Sri Lanka farmers as cause remains mystery 18.1.2015 Star Tribune: World
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Bowing to Monsanto, USDA Approves New GMO Soy and Cotton Crops 16.1.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Tyrone Hayes on the misfortune of frogs, crooked science and why we should shun GMOs 16.1.2015 TreeHugger
The esteemed biologist talks to TreeHugger on the occasion of a new documentary about his work, directed by Jonathan Demme.
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USDA Approves New Pesticide Promoting Genetically Engineered (GE) Crops 16.1.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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State puts limits on a pesticide used for strawberries, other crops 15.1.2015 LA Times: Environment
California farmers must restrict their use of a tear gas-like pesticide applied to strawberries and other crops under new rules designed to protect farmworkers and people who live, work and go to school near agricultural fields.
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How the Great Food War Will Be Won 14.1.2015 Truthout.com
Heirloom carrots and leeks at a farmers market. (Photo: Cyclotourist ) By conventional wisdom it is excellent news. Researchers from Iowa have shown that organic farming methods can yield almost as highly as pesticide-intensive methods. Other researchers, from Berkeley, California, have reached a similar conclusion . Indeed, both findings met with a very enthusiastic reception. The enthusiasm is appropriate, but only if one misses a deep and fundamental point: that even to participate in such a conversation is to fall into a carefully laid trap. The strategic centrepiece of Monsanto's PR, and also that of just about every major commercial participant in the industrialised food system, is to focus on the promotion of one single overarching idea. The big idea that industrial producers in the food system want you to believe is that only they can produce enough for the future population ( Peekhaus 2010 ). Thus non-industrial systems of farming, such as all those which use agroecological methods, or SRI , or ...
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How much more evidence do we need to act on neonicotinoids? 13.1.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 New evidence suggests that using neonicotinoids to control soybean pests may be hurting farmers. Thiomethoxam, a neonicotinoid nerve poison, is widely applied to soybeans as a seed coating. After a bean seed is planted and it germinates and grows into a plant, every cell of the plant becomes infused with the neonicotinoid pesticide. In theory, when a pest feeds on the soybean plant, it dies from neonicotinoid pesticide exposure. From a farmer's perspective, it is increasingly evident that neonicotinoids are being used in unacceptable ways. From an environmental perspective, the evidence of harm is ...
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