User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Sep 02 2015 23:01 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Addiction Science Can Help Us Understand the Bee Crisis 2.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The collapse of bee colonies around the world has received much publicity lately. It is a trend with alarming implications given bees' crucial role in pollinating many agricultural crops, and some researchers have attributed it, at least in part, to widespread use of a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids. These are chemically related to nicotine, and they are thought to challenge the health of bee colonies by impairing bees' ability to learn and navigate as well as impairing their motor functioning. Recent research now suggests that bees may be preferentially drawn to foods laced with these pesticides as a result of reward mechanisms. It is a fascinating lesson in how knowledge gleaned from one area of science -- in this case addiction science -- can inform our understanding of a global ecological crisis. Image Courtsey of CC0 Public Domain In a letter published in Nature in May , a team of British researchers reported that honeybees and bumblebees actually preferred sucrose solutions that ...
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Denver quarantines marijuana products at two businesses for pesticides 2.9.2015 Denver Post: Local
Denver health officials on Tuesday quarantined "several hundred" lozenges at a marijuana-edibles maker and raw marijuana at a separate dispensary whose product labels list pesticides ...
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GMOs: The Effects of Emerging Technologies 1.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In my last post , I uncovered some of the places genetically modified organisms are entering our world and permeating our very lifestyles. It is safe to say that the rapid advances of genetic engineering are transforming our daily lives sometimes unseen and mostly untested. What do we really know about their effects on the environment and our health? Some insist that the technology is safe and to stop being anti-science luddites. Others hold to the precautionary principle . Let's take a look at some of the consequences being uncovered by scientists around the globe. Here is what we know: Toxins are on the Rise Agricultural Economist and scientist Chuck Benbrook has spent a good portion of his professional career studying the effects of agriculture, specifically GMO crops. In his 2012 study , "Impacts of genetically engineered crops on pesticide use in the U.S. -- the first sixteen years," he displays that the use of herbicides has increased dramatically since the inception of herbicide-tolerant varieties ...
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More Evidence of Roundup's Link to Kidney, Liver Damage 1.9.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Given even very low levels of exposure, Roundup can potentially result in organ damage when it comes to liver and kidney function. (Photo: Crop Duster via Shutterstock; Edited: LW / TO) Long-term exposure to tiny amounts of Roundup - thousands of times lower than what is permitted in US drinking water - may lead to serious problems in the liver and kidneys, according to a new study . The study looked at the function of genes in these organs and bolsters a controversial 2012 study that found rats exposed to small amounts of the herbicide Roundup in their drinking water had liver and kidney damage.  It is the first to examine the impacts of chronic, low exposure of Roundup on genes in livers and kidneys and suggests another potential health impact for people and animals from the widely used weed killer. "Given even very low levels of exposure, Roundup can potentially result in organ damage when it comes to liver and kidney function," said senior author Michael Antoniou, head of the Gene Expression and ...
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Bees feel the squeeze as cropland consumes habitat 1.9.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
North Dakota and Minnesota researchers studying Midwest bee health and land use say a shifting agricultural landscape is making it harder for bees to find enough food.
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Patients fooled by fake drugs made with poison 30.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
"My daughter got ill with pneumonia, so I was told to give her some powder medication from the local market," Shazill Maqsood says.
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Beekeepers, Environmentalists Question EPA's Commitment to Saving Bees 27.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Center for Food Safety Sues Department of Agriculture for Withholding Genetically Engineered Crop Records 26.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Bee decline studied with tiny backpack trackers 26.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
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How to get rid of ticks on your property 19.8.2015 TreeHugger
Or, a lesson in learning to love opossums.
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Even Indoor Cats Can Be Exposed to Lawn Chemicals 19.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If you have a cat -- especially one that never goes outdoors -- you may not give much thought to the dangers that lawn chemicals can pose for your feline companion. But if you, your homeowners association or your neighbors use fertilizers, pesticides or other chemicals in your yard, your kitty may be exposed to these toxic agents in ways you never even considered. Obviously, if your cat spends some or most of her time outside (which I don't recommend for the sake of her safety and health), there's a good chance she'll absorb lawn chemicals through her paws, or ingest them when she grooms or nibbles grass or other outdoor plants. But there's another way your cat can be exposed even if she never steps foot outside. The potentially toxic chemicals found in lawn fertilizers and pesticides come indoors on the shoes of humans and the paws and coats of dogs. Common chemicals found in herbicides, including 2,4-D and dicamba, are easily tracked indoors where they contaminate the air and surfaces inside your home, ...
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Bad bugs: State’s lice now highly resistant to common treatment 18.8.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Washington is among at least 25 states where head lice have become highly resistant to the most common over-the-counter products used to treat them, new research says.
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Despite banning carcinogenic pesticides in 2005, New York City agencies still use thousands of pounds each year 12.8.2015 TreeHugger
There are pros and cons as risks must be balanced with West Nile virus and other known dangers.
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Get the GMO Out of My Mustard 12.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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The Next Great GMO Debate 11.8.2015 Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories

Deep inside its labs, Monsanto is learning how to modify crops by spraying them with RNA rather than tinkering with their genes.

The Colorado potato beetle is a voracious eater. The insect can chew through 10 square centimeters of leaf a day, and left unchecked it will strip a plant bare. But the beetles I was looking at were doomed. The plant they were feeding on—bright green and carefully netted in Monsanto’s labs outside St. Louis—had been doused with a spray of RNA.

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Court tells EPA it's done "too little, too late" on toxic pesticide and orders decision on ban petition 11.8.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: In June 2015, a coalition of groups including NRDC and Pesticide Action Network took the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to court because of their almost decade-long inaction on our petition to ban the dangerous pesticide chlorpyrifos. Today, the US 9th...
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Minnesota researchers eye crops that feed bees, make money 10.8.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Western Minnesota researchers are experimenting with plants that can produce profitable oilseeds for farmers and also deliver a critical food source for bees and other pollinating insects.
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Routt County CSU Extension: Is organic produce worth the price? 9.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
In the produce department, I am often faced with quandary: Should I spring for the organic or save some money and buy the conventionally grown fruits and vegetables? It’s a conversation I have with myself weekly, but for many, there is no debate — of course, you’d buy organic. They view the decision as a social statement that defines their relationship with their food and the environment. For them, buying organic is an obvious choice, yet I still struggle spending the extra money for organic carrots or broccoli. Maybe you do, too. While there may be a variety reasons for buying organic, I decided to focus on a specific part of the conventional vs. organic choice and review current research about the nutritional benefits of each. I’m not alone in my interest. According to the Economic Research Service of the USDA, in 2013, 81 percent of families reported they are purchasing organic products at least sometimes. The Organic Trade Association in 2013 reported that 41 percent of those organic-buying ...
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Scientists Just Came Up With the Craziest Way to Protect Your Kale 6.8.2015 Mother Jones
A version of this story was originally published on Gastropod. Farmers searching for an eco-friendly way to combat pests in their fields might someday have a surprising new weapon: speakers. It may seem crazy, but scientists hope that sound systems bumping just the right noises can prime plants to pump up the levels of their own, innate chemical protection. That's just one of the ways that researchers are eavesdropping on the sounds of the farm in order to improve agriculture, as we report on this episode of Gastropod , a podcast about the science and history of food. From James Bond-inspired spy devices that can capture the wing-beats of hungry insects, to microphone-equipped drones patrolling henhouses in search of sick chickens, we discover that sound has the potential to help reduce pesticide use, make our vegetables even more nutritious, and even improve animal welfare. Mozart for Plants The idea that plants can hear and respond to music has a long and checkered history. Charles Darwin made his son, ...
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Oregon warning marijuana growers against illegal pesticides 6.8.2015 AP Washington
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) -- Authorities are warning Oregon marijuana growers to be very careful using pesticides....
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