User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Jul 04 2015 22:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Hopes low for poisoned family 4.7.2015 Philly.com News
Three members of a Delaware family poisoned by pesticide while they vacationed in the U.S. Virgin Islands will likely never recover from their paralyzing illness, the island's governor said last week.
U.S., European Regulators, the Pope Agree: Time to Re-assess Pesticide Risks 3.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We know a lot about glyphosate, the pesticide widely known as Roundup. We know it kills the only food of the monarch caterpillar, linking it to nearly a 90 percent decline in monarch butterflies over the past two decades. We know that a report released by the World Health Organization in March links it to cancer. We know the Netherlands has banned over-the-counter sales of it. We know this month, France did the same. And this week, in response to a lawsuit filed by the conservation group where I work, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agreed for the first time to analyze how 1,500 endangered plants and animals are impacted by Roundup and atrazine -- the two most commonly used pesticides in the world -- as well as well as two other pesticides similar to atrazine. Despite the many known risks associated with all four toxins, hundreds of millions of pounds of them are dumped on U.S. fields and gardens every year. So a fair response would be to ask why the EPA wasn't already assessing those risks. The ...
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A Bold Plan for Saving Pollinators 2.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Honey bees foraging in almonds / UC Davis Department of Entomology "We need solutions to the bee crisis," said Laurie Davies Adams, head of the Pollinator Partnership , at a packed briefing on Capitol Hill, which was organized by her organization and the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) . The honey bee crisis Adams is deeply worried about is caused by the spread of colony collapse disorder, which has decimated hives across the U.S. Scientists say a combination of stressors is killing off honey bees, including the loss of the habitat they need for foraging, the widespread use of agricultural pesticides and fungicides, and disease. Other critical pollinators, like native bees, monarch butterflies, and bats, face similar challenges. While the destruction of these species is a cause of concern in itself, it's also causing real fears among many of country's farmers who rely on honey bees to pollinate their crops, at a cost of billions every year. President and First Lady Obama have a "personal ...
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In Boon for Monsanto, Federal Judge Quashes Maui County GMO Ban 1.7.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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California's weak regulation doesn't curb toxic pesticide use 1.7.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: After years of delay on the neurotoxic pesticide chlorpyrifos, federal and state regulators have come out back-to-back acknowledging the hazards of this toxic chemical. But even with these announcements, communities are left waiting for meaningful protections. On June 30, 2015,...
'God Will Give Me Justice' 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When I hear the words chosen for the title of this article, I think of retired bio-chemist and high school chemistry teacher Blaine Malquist. This famous quote from The Count of Monte Cristo was used by the 68-year-old grandfather as he described to me his battle with the EPA , the Utah Department of Agriculture, the Utah Department of Health, and the Office of the Utah Attorney General. Blaine's story of negligence and lack of regulatory oversight evolved from years of pesticide abuse in his hometown of Nelphi, Utah, that first began in 2004 when Juab County Utah began spraying Permethrin as part of a mosquito abatement program. Juab County did this in anticipation that West Nile virus was going to become an issue. This declaration of war against an imaginary enemy (according to the CDC the number of cases of West Nile Virus in Utah are extremely low, just two in 2014 ) has resulted in the continual spraying of dangerous pyrethroid insecticides , several times a week in Blaine's neighborhood and on his ...
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Colorado beekeepers hope to turn trend of die-offs locally, nationally 29.6.2015 Denver Post: Local
Colorado's honeybee die-off reached a near-record 38 percent this year, mirroring the national 42 percent die-off — and spurring a widening push to plant flowers that nourish ...
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What Makes a Poison? 28.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Read More: 20 Women Who Should Appear on the $10 Bill 26.6.2015 American Prospect
Public Domain In a speech last year in Kansas City, President Barack Obama said he received a letter from a nine-year-old girl that included a list of possible women to put on America’s paper bills and coins, “which I thought was a pretty good idea." In March of this year, Barbara Ortiz Howard and Susan Ades Stone started a campaign called Women on 20s to demand that the government replace former President Andrew Jackson’s image on the $20 bill with a woman from history. Now, the Obama administration is following through, although not in the way that the two women and the many followers they galvanized had hoped. Last week, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced that in 2020—the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote—a woman will appear on the $10 note, not the $20 bill.  Lew explained that the $10 bill was already scheduled to be redesigned to deal with counterfeiting threats. The new currency will feature state-of-the-art security and composition features and will ...
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GMO food should be labeled 26.6.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Recently, at my neighborhood supermarket, I spotted a young mom pushing a cart with two children and a week's worth of groceries. I watched as she checked each item's label carefully before putting it into her cart. Was she looking for peanuts that could send her kids to the emergency room, checking the nutritional content to make sure they get enough vitamin D, or seeing if there were additives or sweeteners she'd rather have them avoid?
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World Health Organization Determines That Major Herbicide, 2,4-D, May Cause Cancer 25.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Enlist Duo active ingredients linked to cancer 24.6.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Kristi Pullen, Staff Scientist, Washington, D.C.: Chemicals. Cancer. Cash. Wonderful plot devices for a binge-worthy television series featuring a Winnebago-driving high school teacher turned kingpin. Not so amusing, however, when they converge in a pesticide recently approved by EPA for use on fields planted with genetically...
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WHO Says Widely-Used Dow Herbicide 'Possibly Carcinogenic' to Humans 23.6.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Explainer: Is Aircraft Cabin Air Toxic? 23.6.2015 Truthout.com
In 2003, a survey of pilots belonging to the British Airline Pilots Association suggested that up to 96 percent of contaminated air events may go unreported. (Photo: Pieter van Marion/Flickr ) Also see: Pesticides on Planes: How Airlines Are Softly Killing Us Following the death of commercial airline pilot Richard Westgate, an inquest was launched into the cause of his death. Westgate had previously claimed that his health problems were caused by exposure to on board toxic chemicals and a subsequent coroner's report raised concerns with the pilot's employers, British Airways, and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), regarding the health effect of aircraft cabin air on aircraft occupants. Both organisations have responded to the report and stress that they take the matter of cabin air quality very seriously but that scientific evidence had not established a risk to ill-health. The investigation is ongoing and the inquest has not yet been heard. This hasn't stopped at least 17 former and serving cabin crew ...
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Ecologist-in-Chief Urges Changes in Production and Consumption 19.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pope Francis used his authority as one of the earth's most recognized religious leaders to issue an encyclical -- or letter -- on climate change and other environmental issues. The statement brings a much needed moral dimension to the climate crisis, which for too long has been framed predominantly in scientific or political terms. While, for the first time ever, the statement was sent to every Roman Catholic parish in the world, the pope didn't limit his message to the world's 1.254 billion Catholics. Rather his intention was to address all 7.125 billion of us regardless of religion: "In this encyclical I especially propose to enter into discussion with everyone regarding our common home." By this, of course, he means our beautiful Earth. The pope, who named himself after Francis of Assisi the patron saint of ecology, is calling on every individual to be a steward of creation. Ecology after all, is the study of living things and their relations to one another. The Earth is known for many things, but I ...
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US agrees to pay millions for Agent Orange claims 19.6.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Ending years of wait, the government agreed Thursday to provide disability benefits to as many as 2,100 Air Force reservists and active-duty forces exposed to Agent Orange residue on airplanes used in the Vietnam ...
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DDT exposure quadruples breast cancer risk 18.6.2015 TreeHugger
Women whose mothers had elevated levels of DDT in their blood during pregnancy had a nearly fourfold increase in risk of developing breast cancer by age 52, study finds.
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EPA Forced to Decide This Month on Pesticide's Fate 18.6.2015 Truthout.com
A California appeals court ruled this week that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has until the end of this month to decide whether or not to ban a widely used pesticide linked to a number of health problems. The order, filed by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, forces the EPA’s hand on the pesticide chlorpyrifos (pronounced KLOR – pie -ra – phos), one the most commonly applied organophosphate pesticides with an estimated 10 million pounds applied annually. While banned for more than a decade for household use, it’s still used commercially on corn, soybeans, fruit and nut trees and some golf courses. In 2012 the EPA required homes and schools to have buffers to reduce exposure. The order is in response to a lawsuit filed in 2007 by the Pesticide Action Network and the Natural Resources Defense Council calling for the EPA to cancel registration for the pesticide. While manufacturers such as Dow Agrosciences have maintained the safety and efficiency of chlorpyrifos, scientists have expressed concern ...
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Preventing Pollution Protects Kids and Would Save California Billions! 17.6.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Miriam Rotkin-Ellman, Scientist, San Francisco: The findings of today's groundbreaking report by the Public Health Institute and the California Environment Health Tracking Program give new meaning to the old saying: "An ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure." When they analyzed how environmental hazards...
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The Long and Disturbing Story of Corporations Outsourcing Catastrophe 17.6.2015 Truthout.com
While some companies target sites within the United States to dump pollution, more commonly, corporations either move production overseas or ship waste abroad. Twenty years after NAFTA, nothing has changed. Corporate control over the US government continues to ensure that trade agreements do not include environmental restrictions on corporate actions. (Image: The New Press) Our systems of industrial production are as harmful today as they have ever been, but now the ugly side of manufacturing is hidden in faraway places where workers are most vulnerable. Out of Sight, by labor historian Erik Loomis, explains how this came to pass and how workers can take power back from corporations. Order the book now by donating to Truthout! In the following excerpt from Out of Sight, the history of US corporate pollution and toxic dumping is recounted. From the moment American corporations were born in the late eighteenth century, they saw the natural world as a dumping ground. Within a few years of an industry ...
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