User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Pesticides
Last updated: Jun 22 2017 10:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Five siblings poisoned in Punjab, brother’s role suspected 22.6.2017 India – The Indian Express
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New Claims Against Monsanto In Consumer Lawsuit Over Roundup Herbicide 21.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Another day, another lawsuit against global seed and chemical giant Monsanto Co. In a complaint filed Tuesday in federal court in Wisconsin, six consumers alleged that the company’s top-selling Roundup herbicide has been falsely promoted as uniquely safe when it actually can have profound harmful impacts on human gut bacteria critical to good health. The lawsuit, which also names Roundup distributor Scotts Miracle-Gro Co . as a defendant, specifically alleges that consumers are being deceived by inaccurate and misleading statements made by Monsanto regarding glyphosate, the active weed-killing ingredient in Roundup. Plaintiffs include residents of Wisconsin, Illinois, California, New York, New Jersey and Florida. Glyphosate, which Monsanto introduced as an herbicide in 1974 and is widely used in growing food crops, has been promoted for years as a chemical that kills plants by targeting an enzyme that is not found in people or pets . The lawsuit claims that assertion is false, however, and argues that ...
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‘How do I know my tampons are safe?’: More women push for detailed labels on feminine care products 20.6.2017 Washington Post
‘How do I know my tampons are safe?’: More women push for detailed labels on feminine care products
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Monsanto Spin Doctors Target Cancer Scientist In Flawed Reuters Story 17.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a well-orchestrated and highly coordinated media coup, Monsanto Co. and friends this week dropped a bombshell on opponents who are seeking to prove that the company’s beloved Roundup herbicide causes cancer. A widely circulated story published June 14 in the global news outlet Reuters (for which I formerly worked) laid out what appeared to be a scandalous story of hidden information and a secretive scientist, “exclusive” revelations that the story said could have altered a critical 2015 classification that associated Monsanto’s Roundup to cancer and triggered waves of lawsuits against Monsanto. It was a blockbuster of a story, and was repeated by news organizations around the globe, pushed by press releases from Monsanto-backed organizations and trumpeted by industry allies like the American Chemistry Council. It was also flawed and misleading in a number of critical respects. Authored by Reuters’ reporter Kate Kelland, who has a history of cozy relations with a group partly funded by agrichemical ...
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Of Mice, Monsanto and a Mysterious Tumor 16.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Call it the case of the mysterious mouse tumor. It's been 34 years since Monsanto Co. presented US regulators with a seemingly routine study analyzing the effects the company's best-selling herbicide might have on rodents. Now, that study is once again under the microscope, emerging as a potentially pivotal piece of evidence in litigation brought by hundreds of people who claim Monsanto's weed killer gave them cancer. This month, tissue slides from long-dead mice in that long-ago research study are being scrutinized by fresh eyes as an expert pathologist employed by lawyers for cancer victims looks for evidence the lawyers hope will help prove a cover-up of the dangers of the weed killer called glyphosate. Glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in Monsanto's branded Roundup products, is the most widely used herbicide in the world, and is applied broadly in the production of more than 100 food crops, including wheat, corn and soy, as well as on residential lawns, golf courses and school ...
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Of Mice, Monsanto And A Mysterious Tumor 8.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
(First published in Environmental Health News .) Call it the case of the mysterious mouse tumor. It’s been 34 years since Monsanto Co. presented U.S. regulators with a seemingly routine study analyzing the effects the company’s best-selling herbicide might have on rodents. Now, that study is once again under the microscope, emerging as a potentially pivotal piece of evidence in litigation brought by hundreds of people who claim Monsanto’s weed killer gave them cancer. This week tissue slides from long-dead mice in that long-ago research study are being scrutinized by fresh eyes as an expert pathologist employed by lawyers for cancer victims looks for evidence the lawyers hope will help prove a cover-up of the dangers of the weed killer called glyphosate. Glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s branded Roundup products, is the most widely used herbicide in the world, and is applied broadly in the production of more than 100 food crops, including wheat, corn and soy, as well as on ...
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States Challenge Scott Pruitt's Decision to Keep Pesticide Linked to Brain Damage in Food Supply 8.6.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Rob Franksdad ; Edited: LW / TO) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt is facing a challenge from seven states over his decision to ditch an EPA proposal that would have kept a pesticide linked to brain damage in children out of the food supply. On Tuesday, a coalition of Democratic state attorneys general filed an administrative challenge to Pruitt's March 27 order denying a decade-old petition to ban chlorpyrifos, a controversial bug killer used to control pests on food crops such as apples, strawberries and oranges, as well as at facilities such as golf courses. The order quashed an agency proposal rolled out under the Obama administration to ban chlorpyrifos on food products due to health risks. Pruitt issued the order at the last minute to meet a court-ordered deadline requiring the EPA to make a final decision on the ban after years of review.   Environmental groups have long fought to restrict the use of chlorpyrifos and other controversial pesticides and filed ...
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FDA Resumes Testing Foods For Weed Killer, Safety Questions Grow 8.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has resumed its first-ever endeavor to evaluate how much of a controversial chemical is making its way into the U.S. food supply. And the tests can’t come soon enough as safety concerns about the herbicide known as glyphosate grow. The FDA, the nation’s chief food safety regulator, launched what it calls a “special assignment” last year to analyze certain foods for glyphosate residues after the agency was criticized by the U.S. Government Accountability Office for failing to include glyphosate in annual testing programs that look for many less-used pesticides in foods. But the agency scuttled the testing after only a few months amid disagreement and difficulties with establishing a standard methodology to use across the agency’s multiple U.S. laboratories, according to FDA sources. Many observers suspected the suspension might be politically motivated because it came after one FDA chemist found glyphosate in several samples of U.S. honey and oatmeal products , ...
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EPA scientists said ban the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Scott Pruitt said no 7.6.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Miners carried canaries into coal mines; if the canary died it was an early warning of the presence of toxic gases that could also asphyxiate humans or explode. The Trump administration has decided to use children and farmworkers as 21st century canaries, continuing their exposure to a pesticide...

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The EPA's Inspector General Is Probing Whether An Agency Staffer Colluded With Monsanto 7.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The inspector general for the Environmental Protection Agency is initiating a probe into possible collusion between a former high-ranking EPA official and Monsanto, the maker of the herbicide glyphosate, according to a letter the IG sent to a lawmaker last Friday that HuffPost has obtained. The inspector general’s move comes in response to a request from Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) for an investigation into whether the EPA staffer colluded with the agricultural giant to bias research on glyphosate, a key component of the product Roundup. His request was based on media reports of documents released in the course of a lawsuit against Monsanto alleging glyphosate causes cancer, and that the company may have spun research and hired scientists to cover this up. “As you are aware, there is considerable public interest regarding allegations of such collusion,” wrote Inspector General Arthur A. Elkins Jr. in his response to Lieu, dated May 31 . “As a result, I have asked the EPA OIG Office of Investigations to ...
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Food: Taqueria Hidalgo closed down for cockroaches — again 7.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The Salt Lake County Health Department has shut down a Mexican restaurant in South Salt Lake for the second time in 10 months because of cockroaches. Taqueria Hidalgo, 266 E. 3300 South, “was closed for presenting an imminent health hazard,” according to a June 2 notice posted on the department website. “There are cockroaches in single service items,” the notice states, as well as “dead cockroaches in the facility.” In all, inspectors found 23 violations, 12 considered critical. Among the oth... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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No unborn baby is safe from toxic pollutants 2.6.2017 TreeHugger
It is frightening how easily pesticides and other chemicals can infiltrate the body's protective barriers -- and the damage they do.
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Two Scientists, Two Different Approaches To Saving Bees From Poison Dust 27.5.2017 NPR Health Science
Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers.
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House approves bill seeking to upend EPA pesticide rule 25.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday passed a Republican-backed measure reversing an Environmental Protection Agency requirement that those spraying pesticides on or near rivers and lakes file for a permit. The chamber voted largely along party lines to approve the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017. In the preceding floor debate, the bill’s supporters […]
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Miami's Zika Outbreak Began Months Before It Was First Detected 24.5.2017 NPR Health Science
Travelers infected with the Zika virus in the Caribbean brought it to South Florida multiple times before officials realized it had reached the U.S., an analysis of virus genomes finds.
Lawsuit Targets Potential Cancer Threat in the South's Farming Communities 23.5.2017 Truthout.com
More than 800 cancer patients nationwide are involved in a class-action lawsuit that accuses the chemical giant Monsanto of failing to adequately warn them about a possible link between their disease and glyphosate, the key ingredient in its enormously popular Roundup herbicide. The lawsuit was sparked by a 2015 determination by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that glyphosate was a probable carcinogen, with research tying it to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of blood cancer, in humans. The IARC also found "convincing evidence" that glyphosate can cause cancer in laboratory animals, while other studies it reviewed found the chemical damages human DNA. Monsanto maintains that glyphosate is safe, as industry-funded studies have found. But the class-action lawsuit has unearthed documents that cast doubt on its safety -- and on the handling of its potential risks by the US Environmental Protection Agency. As the New York Times reported earlier this year: The ...
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Trump may be in trouble, but his appointees advance his startling agenda 19.5.2017 LA Times: Environment

Cable news is consumed with wall-to-wall coverage of every new development in Donald Trump’s political implosion, and liberals, still stunned by Trump’s rise to the White House, cannot get enough of it. For them, this national nightmare can’t be over soon enough.

Nevertheless, one disturbing reality...

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Lawn care companies, homeowners challenge Montgomery pesticide ban 18.5.2017 Washington Post
Lawn care companies, homeowners challenge Montgomery pesticide ban
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The Trump Administration Just Punted on How to Handle the Most Toxic Pesticides 17.5.2017 Mother Jones
Back in March, the Environmental Protection Agency abruptly reversed its own decision to ban a highly toxic insecticide called chlorpyrifos—an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is strongly suspected of hindering brain development in kids, even at tiny exposure levels. Turns out, the EPA wasn't done running interference for the chemical, a big seller for agrichemical giant Dow Agrosciences. On Monday, the agency shelved a proposal , originally scheduled to go into effect on March 6, intended to ensure that such poisons are safely applied. It was supposed to regulate "restricted use pesticides," which the EPA defines as ones with the "potential to cause unreasonable adverse effects to the environment and injury to applicators or bystanders without added restrictions." Examples (list here ) include chlorpyrifos and atrazine , a widely used herbicide linked to sex changes in frogs and cancer in people . Currently, anyone who applies pesticides on the restricted-use list has to have safety training. The ...
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