User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
1 new since Apr 23 2017 14:07 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Embattled EPA pitches 40 “quick fixes” to slow poisoning of water at inactive Colorado mines 23.4.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
"Funding is a question. We certainly will be requesting money this year. We will start the work as soon as the funding is available - no earlier than probably the fourth quarter this year." - EPA remedial project manager Rebecca Thomas
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EDF Tracks Air Quality in Areas Removed from the Texas Air Pollutant Watch List 21.4.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Elena Craft, PhD EDF’s Maia Draper co-wrote this post We’ve written before about the Air Pollutant Watch List , a Texas program for addressing harmful air pollutants that pose a particularly high risk to public health. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) adds areas to the Air Pollution Watch List where monitoring data show persistently high concentrations of air toxics above the state’s health-based guidelines for these substances. Listing an area on the Air Pollution Watch List enables TCEQ to dedicate additional time and resources to reducing air toxic emissions in these areas. A listing can serve as an important tool for reducing dangerous air pollution and protecting public health. However, since 2007, TCEQ has removed 14 monitored pollutants in 10 areas from the Air Pollution Watch List. TCEQ says that average concentration levels of air toxics in these areas no longer exceed state guidelines, and therefore that additional scrutiny and resources to encourage air quality ...
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Progress takes vigilance to reduce children’s exposure to lead 21.4.2017 Nanotechnology Notes
Tom Neltner, J.D., is Chemicals Policy Director The United States has made significant progress over the past fifteen years towards reducing children’s exposure to lead. While much more needs to be done to eliminate the more than $50 billion a year in societal costs from lead, the progress is good news for children since it is […]
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Happy Earth Day! Here Are All The Terrible Things Donald Trump Has Done So Far. 21.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
President Donald Trump gave many signals on the campaign trail that his presidency would be a disaster for the environment. He called global warming a “hoax” and “bullshit,”  vowed to dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, and undo regulations to revive the fossil fuel industry.   Almost 100 days into Trump’s tenure, the fears of environmentalists, scientists, public health advocates have been confirmed — and then some. Before he’d even been sworn in, Trump nominated several climate deniers chummy with the fossil fuel industry to his cabinet, including former Texas Gov.  Rick Perry  as the head of the Department of Energy and Oklahoma Attorney General  Scott Pruitt  to head the Environmental Protection Agency ― a man who had sued the agency 14 times over industry regulations. Pruitt recently claimed, in contradiction to overwhelming scientific consensus, that human activity ― i.e. the burning of fossil fuels ― is not definitively the primary contributor to climate change.  On the day Trump took ...
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EPA Considers Gutting Lead Regulations While Scott Pruitt Visits East Chicago 21.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Just as its administrator, Scott Pruitt, was meeting with residents of a neighborhood contaminated by lead, the Environmental Protection Agency announced upcoming reviews of its lead standards under President Trump's executive order requiring federal agencies to gut regulations. East Chicago residents have been waiting weeks for Pruitt to respond to their emergency petition for federal aid. Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt speaks at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, February 25, 2017. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent out a notice on Wednesday announcing a series of upcoming public meetings in which it will consider gutting rules and regulations meant to protect the public from lead and hazardous chemicals, including training programs designed to prevent children from being exposed to lead paint. The notice went out at 2:30, just as EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt was meeting with ...
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Hundreds More Lead Hotpsots Are Identified As Trump Prepares To Gut Programs 21.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
BUFFALO, New York (Reuters) - Laicie Manzella lived in a rundown house on Buffalo’s east side when three of her children tested with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood. Her oldest son suffered nosebleeds, body rashes and a developmental disorder requiring speech therapy. Checking her apartment, county health inspectors found 15 lead violations, all linked to old paint in this blue collar city plagued by lead poisoning. A Reuters investigation found at least four city zip codes here where 40 percent of children tested from 2006 to 2014 had high lead levels, making Buffalo among the most dangerous lead hotspots in America. The rate of high lead tests in these areas was far worse – eight times greater – than that found among children across Flint, Michigan, during that city’s recent water crisis. Federal support has helped Manzella and other families in Buffalo and beyond. This month, her family moved into a gleaming, lead-free apartment renovated by a local nonprofit with funding from the U.S. ...
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Sea Lions In California Are Dying From A Toxic Algae That Ravages Their Brains 21.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Algae so toxic that it’s causing fatal brain damage in California sea lions is the latest problem plaguing ocean animal rescue operations along the Pacific coast. Domoic acid poisoning is emerging as a key threat this year to the animals that ingest the toxin while eating fish and other sea creatures that feed on algae, rescue organizations in southern California warn. Some birds and dolphins have also been affected by the algae, which authorities warn can be harmful to humans who eat shellfish. The neurotoxin that the Pseudo nitzschia algae produces can destroy the brains of sea lions until they no longer know basic survival functions , such as how to evade predators and find food. It can cause sea lions to have seizures and paralysis, while one of the key signs of this dementia is when they are seen rolling their heads repeatedly.  And a spokesman for the Channel Islands Marine and Wildlife Institute told the Ventura County Star that this is the “ worst year ever ” for cases of domoic acid ...
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Lead Poisons Children In L.A. Neighborhoods Rich And Poor 21.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
With its century-old Spanish-style homes tucked behind immaculately trimmed hedges, San Marino, California, is among the most coveted spots to live in the Los Angeles area. Its public schools rank top in the state, attracting families affiliated with CalTech, the elite university blocks away. The city’s zoning rules promote a healthy lifestyle, barring fast food chains. Home values in L.A. County census tract 4641, in the heart of San Marino and 20 minutes from downtown Los Angeles, can rival those in Beverly Hills. The current average listing price: $2.9 million. But the area has another, unsettling distinction, unknown to residents and city leaders until now: More than 17 percent of small children tested here have shown elevated levels of lead in their blood, according to previously undisclosed L.A. County health data. That far exceeds the 5 percent rate of children who tested high for lead in Flint, Michigan, during the peak of that city’s water contamination crisis. The local blood test data, ...
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Lead-Contaminated Drinking Water Goes Far Beyond Flint 20.4.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
More than a year after lead-contaminated drinking water prompted a state of emergency in  Flint, Michigan , Americans across the country continue to worry about the quality of their drinking water .  In fact, 63 percent of Americans worry “a great deal” about polluted drinking water , and ranked it as more concerning than air pollution, climate change and the extinction of plant and animal species, according to a Gallup poll conducted in March. And while, on the whole, the United States’ drinking water supply is safe, communities around the country continue to grapple with lead exposure. Perhaps most troubling of all, children are at the greatest risk for severe and irreversible lead-related health problems. A panel of experts at The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston will join  Erin Schumaker , senior healthy living editor at The Huffington Post, to discuss these issues and to explain how drinking water becomes contaminated with toxins, what happens to children exposed to lead, ...
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Every drinking fountain and sink in every Colorado school would be tested for lead under public health bill 19.4.2017 Denver Post: Local
Colorado lawmakers want every source of drinking water in Colorado schools to be tested for lead. But some worry that the cost of cleaning up the contamination will hurt cash-strapped schools.
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The Latest: Georgia congressional race heads to runoff 19.4.2017 AP National
DUNWOODY, Ga. (AP) -- The Latest on Georgia's 6th Congressional District election. (all times local):...
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Trump Administration Seeks to Delay Litigation over Vital Mercury and Air Toxics Standards 18.4.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Trump Administration Seeks to Delay Litigation over Vital Mercury and Air Toxics Standards
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A new UCLA law school institute will study the Armenian genocide 18.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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UCLA law school to receive $20 million for human rights institute to study the Armenian genocide and other atrocities 18.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

In a unique blend of Hollywood and human rights, the UCLA law school will receive $20 million in pledged proceeds from a new film on the Armenian genocide to expand its research and teaching of persecution, the university announced Monday.

The donation by a film company founded by the late Kerkor...

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Markets Right Now: Health care, banks lead US stocks lower 18.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local): 9:35 a.m. Stocks are sliding in early trading on Wall Street as health care companies and banks move lower. Goldman Sachs sank 3 percent early Tuesday after its latest earnings fell short of forecasts due to an unusual miss in its trading business. That took […]
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Poisons are us 18.4.2017 Seattle Times: Opinion

President Trump’s zeal to eliminate “unnecessary” regulations is having an effect on regulations intended to protect the public from adverse chemicals, writes columnist Timothy Egan.
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Tax Reform Should Begin With Making Polluters Pay 17.4.2017 Truthout.com
As we begin our national conversation about tax reform, why don't we start with low-hanging fruit -- the things we can all agree are right? Why not reinstate the Superfund tax, which used to make polluters pay to clean up their own mess? By reinstating this "Polluter Pays" tax, American citizens will save literally billions of dollars. There is no need for a new law, big debates or much else. All Congress needs to do is simply reinstate this law, which lapsed at the end of 1995. Everything is already in place, and it's proven to be an effective way to clean up toxic wastes as well as protect public health and the environment. I am sometimes called the "Mother of Superfund," as I led the successful effort to relocate over 800 families, including my own, away from the Love Canal toxic waste dump where we lived in Niagara Falls, NY. We all celebrated in 1980 when President Carter signed the bill to create the Superfund , which forced polluters to take responsibility for their actions. Then in 1981, ...
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EPA's Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee recommends four top priorities for EPA to protect kids from lead 17.4.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Tom Neltner, J.D. , is Chemicals Policy Director For the past 20 years, the Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee (CHPAC), with its diverse members that include pediatricians and industry toxicologists, has been responding to requests for guidance from Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrators. In December 2016, EPA’s Administrator asked CHPAC to provide the agency with its “highest priority advice” on lead. Citing the children’s health risks posed by lead, the economic and racial disparities and the demonstrated effectiveness of national leadership on the issue, on April 6, CHPAC sent the new administrator, Scott Pruitt, a letter with its four recommended priorities: Strengthen the Agency’s Lead-Based Paint Hazards Standard for lead in paint, dust, and soil. CHPAC stated that the “best evidence shows that a young child living in a home meeting the current lead dust standard still has a 50% chance of exceeding the CDC reference level for blood lead.” The EPA standard is so ...
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6 Ways Trump's Administration Could Literally Make America More Toxic 17.4.2017 Mother Jones
In late March, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide commonly used to ward off insects on fruit and vegetable crops, was nearing the end of a decade-long review process. There's strong evidence suggesting that the insecticide inhibits kids' brain development, and at least 80,000 scientists, environmentalists, and members of the public had signed a petition urging the Environmental Protection Agency to ban the stuff outright. But in the final stages of review, EPA director Scott Pruitt greenlighted the chemical instead , arguing there was insufficient evidence to ban it. Now farmers can continue to apply it to crops like corn, strawberries, almonds, and tomatoes. This year, more controversial pesticides are due for agency review, a process that weighs the latest scientific findings with public comment to determine whether the substance can continue to be used—though the White House has the final say. These reviews often lag for many years. And Trump's EPA, with its anti-regulatory bent and a new administrator plucked ...
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