User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Dec 21 2014 05:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Medtronic, St. Jude roll out enhanced devices to restore normal heart rhythms 21.12.2014 Star Tribune: Business
Medtronic, St. Jude got OK on latest systems offering more options to resynchronize.
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Scrap Tire Playgrounds Lighten Landfills, But Raise Cancer Fears 20.12.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The fire burned for nine months, billowing toxic black smoke thousands of feet above its Appalachian valley source and across five states. It would take 20 years and $12 million to clean up the remains of the tire heap. At the time of the 1983 Rhinehart, Virginia, tire fire, about 90 percent of America's discarded tires went to landfills. There, they would take up massive amounts of space, occasionally ignite, and collect water that created fertile breeding grounds for disease-transmitting mosquitoes . Today, in part because of actions sparked by the Virginia disaster and many smaller tire fires, more than 90 percent of the nation's approximately 230 million tires scrapped each year are put to use -- burned as fuel, incorporated into asphalt roads and, increasingly, shredded into components of products such as synthetic turf sports fields and children's playgrounds . Industry leaders tout this as a win-win for businesses and the planet. But others say we've simply swapped one bad set of environmental ...
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EPA's First-ever Coal Ash Rule Leaves Communities to Protect Themselves 20.12.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Humane Society blames lead bullets for bald eagle death, injury in Wisconsin 20.12.2014 Star Tribune: Local
Louisville Residents on New EPA Coal Ash Protections 20.12.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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EPA Coal Ash Rule Fails to Protect Public Health and Waterways 19.12.2014 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
WASHINGTON (December 19, 2014)—The Environmental Protection Agency’s long-awaited rule on disposal of toxic ash from coal-burning power plants falls far short of what’s needed to protect the public and our waterways from the millions of tons of dangerous sludge that is produced annually, the Natural Resources Defense Council said ...
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A Nurse's Desperate Plea: Show Me The Ebola Money 19.12.2014 NPR News
Patients escape. Long gloves, chlorine and toilets are in short supply. Despite promises of international aid, the essentials of medical care are still missing at one Sierra Leone treatment center.
The 12 Days of a Healthy Home: A Holiday Checklist 19.12.2014 Health

The 12 Days of a Healthy Home: A Holiday ChecklistThe 12 days of Christmas are fast approaching. While five golden rings would be lovely, most of us have no use for two turtle doves, or a partridge. What we do seek, and at the top of most people's wish list these days, is good health. Why then, do we adorn our homes with holiday décor and engage in activities that could be making the whole...


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Running an Ebola Clinic in Sierra Leone Is All About Containment—And Chlorine 19.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
Treating patients with the deadly Ebola virus takes doctors, drugs, and a whole lot of ...
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Closing in on ALS? Link Between Lethal Disease and Algae Explored 18.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Residents of Toledo, Ohio, lost drinking water for days this summer when toxins from a Lake Erie algal bloom were found in the water supply. (Photo: Jeff Reutter / Ohio Sea Grant )For 28 years, Bill Gilmore lived in a New Hampshire beach town, where he surfed and kayaked. “I’ve been in water my whole life,” he said. “Before the ocean, it was lakes. I’ve been a water rat since I was four.” Now Gilmore can no longer swim, fish or surf, let alone button a shirt or lift a fork to his mouth. Earlier this year, he was diagnosed with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease. In New England, medical researchers are now uncovering clues that appear to link some cases of the lethal neurological disease to people’s proximity to lakes and coastal waters. About five years ago, doctors at a New Hampshire hospital noticed a pattern in their ALS patients – many of them, like Gilmore, lived near water. Since then, researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center have identified several ALS hot spots ...
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Worries About Unusual Botulinum Toxin Prove Unfounded 18.12.2014 NPR Health Science
A previously unknown form of botulinum toxin was thought to be resistant to standard treatment raised public health concerns. Subsequent research has allayed those fears.
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Coming Soon: Major GMO Study (Shhh, It Will Be Done in Secret by Russians) 18.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
So here's what happens when Americans don't spend enough time or money testing the safety of our food: Russians say they will do it for us. A group of Russian and European donors recently announced they are raising a whopping $25 million to pay for a major study of the safety of genetically modified food (GMOs) and the ubiquitous herbicide glyphosate, most commonly used as Monsanto's product Roundup. The research project, dubbed "Factor GMO," is being billed as "the world's largest international study on GMO safety." It will examine four primary questions: Is genetically modified food (or the herbicides it is sprayed with) toxic to organ systems over the long-term? Does this food (or its herbicides) cause cancer? Does it reduce fertility or cause birth defects? And is Roundup, as a chemical compound, more or less toxic than its most well-known single ingredient, glyphosate? These are important questions. Since the introduction of genetically engineered seeds in the mid-1990s, the amount of glyphosate ...
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Plant extract trumps nicotine patches to quit smoking 18.12.2014 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
For decades, smokers in eastern Europe have used cytisine from laburnum trees to help them quit. Good results in a new trial could make cytisine much more ...
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Final goodbye: Roll call of some who died in 2014 18.12.2014 Iraq
They each turned a moment of violence into a call to action. For James Brady, that moment was when he was shot and wounded by a would-be presidential assassin. For Chung Eun-yong, it was the killings of his two children during a Korean War ...
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What Happens After You Get That Mammogram 18.12.2014 NPR News
What are the odds that you'll get a false positive when you get a mammogram? How likely is it that it will detect cancer? Here's one way to look at it.
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The realities of living near coal ash 17.12.2014 TreeHugger
In advance of EPA's coal ash standards, a mother of four talks about her family's health problems due to nearby coal ash ponds.
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Fracking-Related Air Pollution Leads to Major Health Threats 17.12.2014 Environmental News Network
A growing body of evidence shows that people both near and far from oil and gas drilling are exposed to fracking-related air pollution that can cause at least five major types of health impacts, according to a new comprehensive analysis of scientific studies to-date by the Natural Resources Defense Council.  The health impacts include respiratory problems, birth defects, blood disorders, cancer and nervous system impacts, raising serious concerns for workers and people living closest to wells, as well as entire regions with high volumes of oil and gas activity.
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Juno vies for cancer treatment lead 17.12.2014 Financial Times: Science & Tech
Cell therapy specialist poised for Nasdaq IPO as segment pulls in investors
The Chemical Ocean 16.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We live in a toxic chemical sea. Over 50 years ago, Rachael Carson in her seminal books Silent Spring and The Sea Around Us sounded the alarm over the deposition of myriad chemicals into our watersheds and waterways through uncontrolled use of fertilizers and pesticides, manufacturing by-products and waste. There was a sudden focus of public awareness that resulted during the next two decades in certain legislation, regulation, outright banning of certain substances, and regional and international attempts to control what was then a new problem and significant health issue. There was some progress to be sure, but today we may need to understand that those advances have not been sustained and that the issue remains as pervasive and threatening as ever before. In a paper in the Houston Journal of International Law in 2011, David L. VanderZwaag, Professor in Ocean Law and Governance at the Marine and Environmental Law Institute, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, outlined the state of international ...
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