User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: May 28 2016 02:00 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Deadly water still haunts Grassy Narrows 27.5.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. After decades of environmental neglect, the water that flows through Grassy Narrows (Asabiinyashkosiwagong Nitam-Anishinaabeg) First Nation still remains and needs to be properly cleaned up. Even as experts in the field claim that the Wabigoon-English River can be cleaned of its deadly mercury legacy, politcians don't seem to ...
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Poisoning the Earth and Our Health 26.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Why the world must find an antidote to the deadly menace of lead acid batteries When animals began to die in a neighbourhood on the edge of Senegal's capital no one knew why. Then children began to die too. Mothers gave birth to stillborn children and toddlers stopped talking. Some said that the victims of the mysterious illness lived in homes that had been cursed. Others said the families themselves were cursed. But when doctors ran tests on the 18 dead children, they discovered the truth: that the children - all under the age of five - had been poisoned to death by lead. The tragedy crept up on the neighbourhood of Thiaroye-sur-Mer. For years, the uncontrolled recycling of car batteries had allowed large quantities of lead to seep silently into the ground, poisoning the earth around people's homes. When the price of lead sky-rocketed over a five year period, residents began to dig up the soil to collect the valuable metal, whipping up deadly dust clouds that sent tiny particles of lead into the air. If ...
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More and more research shows friends are good for your health 26.5.2016 Washington Post
More and more research shows friends are good for your health
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Seven Myths About GMOs Debunked 26.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Myth 1: GMOs are an "invention" of corporations, and therefore can be patented and owned. Living organisms, including seeds, thus become the "intellectual property" of the GMO industry. Using these property rights, corporations can forcibly prevent farmers from saving and sharing seeds. Farmers harvest crops in Chennai, India. Corporations that produce GMOs are not interested in a free market; they are interested in creating a monopoly over GMOs. (Photo: Vinoth Chandar ; Edited: LW / TO) A global battle is being fought over the future of the world's food. Hear from the women on the front lines in Seed Sovereignty, Food Security: Women in the Vanguard of the Fight Against GMOs and Corporate Agriculture. These seed keepers, food producers, scientists, activists and scholars are committed to building a food system that is better aligned with ecological processes, human health and justice for all. Order this amazing book by donating to Truthout today! The following is excerpted from Vandana Shiva's foreword ...
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Pregnant Women are Regularly Taking Medicine That Could Harm Their Kids 26.5.2016 Mother Jones
Marquita Smiley's first surprise was discovering she was pregnant. Her second was how miserable being pregnant felt. With her older daughter, she had experienced some mild queasiness. This time, the nausea and vomiting were so bad, "I would be calling off work and not wanting to get out of bed." As a single mom in Birmingham, Alabama, and a social worker who investigated cases of child abuse, she didn't have that option. Her OB-GYN wrote a prescription for Zofran (generic name ondansetron), which had been developed for cancer patients ravaged by radiation and chemotherapy but had become the preferred treatment for extreme morning sickness. The pills melted in Smiley's mouth, dissolving the nausea with them. "I felt so much better," she said. "So we just kept kinda going with it." Between 50 and 90 percent of women spend some part of their early pregnancies sick to their stomachs, and what begins as simple nausea can become dangerously debilitating. Some expectant women use ondansetron for only a few ...
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Congress Is Finally Overhauling A Decades-Old Chemical Safety Law 26.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Congress this week is poised to pass legislation overhauling chemical safety for the first time in 40 years -- with strong bipartisan support, no less. It would be the first major new environmental law in two decades. One might expect the feat would be a happy moment for those who have advocated change for years. Except, they aren't all exactly happy. The environmental and public health community is fairly tepid about the final version of the measure, a negotiated text released  last week that combines elements of previously passed Senate and House bills. Some groups have endorsed it. Others are opposed. Many simply point out the bill's strengths and flaws, without taking a position for or against its passage. The consensus is that the bill is good, but not good enough, and probably the best Congress could do.  The bill, called the  Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act , would reform the Toxic Substances Control Act , a 1976 law guiding the regulation of thousands of ...
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Infections are the culprit in Alzheimer’s disease, study suggests 26.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Provocative new research leads to the hypothesis that infections may produce a fierce reaction that leaves debris in the brain, causing Alzheimer’s.
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Who Will Replace Our Century-Old Water Pipes? 26.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Jo Miles

The water that comes out of your tap is clean, right?

It should be. But in the United States, we can’t afford to keep taking for granted that safe, clean water flows from our taps.

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Study shows how air pollution fosters heart disease 25.5.2016 Environmental News Network
Long-term exposure to air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, but the biological process has not been understood. A major, decade-long study of thousands of Americans  found that people living in areas with more outdoor pollution —even at lower levels common in the United States — accumulate deposits in the arteries that supply the heart faster than do people living in less polluted areas.  The study was published May 24 online in The Lancet.
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Burned by Slow Government Response, Residents Mistrust Cleanup Efforts 25.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
When residents don't trust the company who poisoned their water and soil, and they don't trust the government agencies mandated to stop the company, they'll either ignore everything and hope for the best, or they'll take matters into their own hands. Both reactions are in abundance in Vernon, California near the site of a now-shuttered battery recycling plant now owned by Exide Technologies. Exide and the plant's previous owners knowingly leached lead and other carcinogens into the soil, air and water in surrounding residential neighborhoods, a problem made much worse by inadequate government oversight. State regulators  repeatedly warned  Exide Technologies, which ran the Vernon battery smelting facility since 2000, and its previous owners that the plant was releasing dangerous chemicals into the atmosphere. Exide responded only by paying fines and continuing business as usual. The fines were small considering the scope of the damage.  A Los Angeles Times investigation  found that, over more than 15 ...
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Health care CEOs lead the way in 2015 compensation 25.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

It pays to be healthy. Chief executives at health care companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index made millions more in compensation last year than their counterparts in other industries. A look at the top and bottom-paid CEOs last year, by industry, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm. […]
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Surgery performed from miles away 25.5.2016 CNN: Top Stories
In countries ravaged by conflict seeking international medical expertise on the ground can seem almost impossible.
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House approves bill to regulate toxic chemicals 25.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Tuesday easily approved a bipartisan bill that would for the first time regulate tens of thousands of toxic chemicals in everyday products from household cleaners to clothing and furniture. Supporters said the bill would clear up a hodgepodge of state rules and update and improve a toxic-chemicals law that […]
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Bill could put a range of chemicals under federal scrutiny 25.5.2016 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Toxic chemicals used in everyday products such as household cleaners, clothing and furniture have been linked to serious illnesses, including cancer, infertility, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Under current law, only a small fraction of chemicals used in these products have been reviewed for safety....
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House approves bill to regulate toxic chemicals 25.5.2016 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The House on Tuesday easily approved a bipartisan bill that would for the first time regulate tens of thousands of toxic chemicals in everyday products from household cleaners to clothing and furniture....
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Bill could put a range of chemicals under federal scrutiny 25.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — Toxic chemicals used in everyday products such as household cleaners, clothing and furniture have been linked to serious illnesses, including cancer, infertility, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Under current law, only a small fraction of chemicals used in these products have been reviewed for safety. A bill slated for approval in Congress this […]
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EDF Applauds House Passage of Bi-Partisan Chemical Safety Reform 24.5.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
EDF Applauds House Passage of Bi-Partisan Chemical Safety Reform
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One Step Forward and Two Steps Back on Toxic Chemicals 24.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Within the next few days, Congress is likely to enact the first update of a major environmental statute in many years. Widely hailed as a bipartisan compromise, legislation to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA, pronounced like the opera Tosca) was made possible by the steely and relentless determination of the U.S. chemical industry. The deal places burdens on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that will undermine public health and environmental protections for many years to come. A well-funded, politically empowered EPA that employed the best and the brightest of American scientists might be able to make lemonade out of the lemons scattered throughout this unfortunate legislation. But it's far more likely that the agency we have today will soon become mired in "paralysis-by-analysis" before it takes action and a flood of litigation after it - only occasionally - acts. Toxic chemical exposures are so loosely regulated that the Government Accountability Office, the top-flight auditor of ...
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Poor Air Quality Diseases Are Everyone's Responsibility 24.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Image source: PhotoDune When we think about public health, we think in terms of things like nutrition or exercise programs. Too often, we don't think about air quality, and the massive effect outdoor air pollution can have on our health. In 2012, the last year we have data for, outdoor air pollution caused 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide. About 80% of those deaths were related to heart disease and strokes, 20% of lung diseases and infections. While most of those deaths occur in low-income countries, there's trouble in the U.S., as well. The American Lung Association's 2015 " State of the Air " report shows that 47% of Americans are living in areas where pollution levels are dangerously high. Although air quality is better in the U.S. than it was in the days before the Clean Air Act, there's still a lot of progress that needs to be made. The two big hazards in the U.S. now are ozone and particulate pollution. The EPA's latest rules say that ozone levels should be under 70 parts per ...
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