User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Jul 26 2016 03:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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They didn’t know the cause of a toddler’s painful legs, rash and bleeding gums. The diagnosis was stunningly simple. 26.7.2016 Washington Post
Doctors initially suspected Guillain-Barré syndrome, which can cause rapid paralysis, or a cancer that was pressing on the spinal cord.
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Do you really need to shell out money for a pricey 'organic bed'? 23.7.2016 LA Times: Health

Your bed is supposed to be the place where you can rest your weary head and let the day’s worries fade away.

But some heath and environmental activists fear our beds — and sofas and other household products — could be making us sick.

At issue are chemical materials that can be found in some vinyl...

Environmental regulators say levels of toxic algae decreasing; Utah Lake water OK for irrigation 23.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah County Health Department has decided to end its closure of the Jordan River in Utah County, but Utah Lake remains closed and health advisories remain in effect, based on the latest data from the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). The most recent set of tests found that concentrations of cyanobacteria in Utah Lake have decreased in most locations to nonthreatening levels, with the exceptions of Lincoln Harbor and the American Fork harbor, where counts continue to exceed the ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Jordan River re-opens in Utah County after algal bloom; warning remains in effect 23.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah County Health Department has decided to end its closure of the Jordan River in Utah County, but health advisories remain in effect. Ainslynn Tolman-Hill said the county health department decided to life the closure in light of recent test results that indicate the concentration of toxic cyanobacteria in the river is declining. However, she said, the department continues to encourage people to avoid the river, because the algae is still present in potentially harmful concentrations. “Dan...
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Zinefest, Mount Rainier Choir Festival, Stained glass exhibit, concerts, fitness. 23.7.2016 Washington Post
Zinefest, Mount Rainier Choir Festival, Stained glass exhibit, concerts, fitness.
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10 hazardous chemicals in consumer products the EPA should regulate now 22.7.2016 TreeHugger
The new chemical safety law prompts EWG to list the highest-priority toxic chemicals that desperately need review.
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A Breath Of Fresh Air: New York's Historic Ventilation Regs In Nail Salons 22.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ventilation regulations aren't what the average person associates with a safe and healthy workplace. But for nail salon workers, who are breathing in a toxic cocktail of chemicals every day on the job, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's recent executive order requiring ventilation in nail salons is a life saver. After the Governor's historic nail salon legislation passed last year advocates immediately received a flood of inquiries from workers about health and safety in their salons. The standout was a young immigrant woman from Mexico who shared her worries over her first born son's health, who was born with birth deficiencies. She had worked in the salon during her pregnancy and was pregnant again, afraid of the impact that the toxins in her salon would have on her unborn son. Each nail salon worker has her own stories of labored breathing, lingering coughs, or knows coworkers who experienced severe health issues due to prolonged exposure to toxic chemicals. Conscientious nail salon owners and consumers ...
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Former Cleanup Workers Blame Illnesses on Toxic Coal Ash Exposures 21.7.2016 Truthout.com
The Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant looms above parkland today. The area was once coated by coal ash mounds measuring up to 60 feet tall. (Photo: Kristen Lombardi / Center for Public Integrity) It was April 28, 2014, five years after Craig Wilkinson's 12-month stint as a backhoe operator at a massive coal-ash spill in Tennessee. Wilkinson was desperate for answers. Bearing a list of metals -- arsenic, lead, mercury and others concentrated in coal ash -- he arrived at a clinic specializing in toxic exposures. Maybe someone there could tell him what was coursing through his body. Wilkinson, then 56, adopted a "weather-through-it" mentality on the job. But his body had betrayed him since he had signed on as a cleanup worker following a dike failure that unleashed a billion gallons of ash from a Tennessee Valley Authority power plant. His vision grew dull, his head dizzy. Within months, he experienced a cough so persistent that it left him gasping for breath. By 2012, he was diagnosed ...
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EWG Lists the Top Ten Toxic Chemicals EPA Should Review Now 21.7.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

The nation’s new chemical safety law promises to give the Environmental Protection Agency expanded authority to regulate hazardous chemicals in consumer products. But of the tens of thousands of chemicals on the market, most never tested for safety, which should the EPA tackle first?

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Op-ed: Algal bloom is harbinger of warmer future 21.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
All along Florida’s waterways, fish are dying, beaches are closing and people are getting sick from a massive, toxic algae stew. The irony is almost as thick as the green slime itself because Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency and is pleading with the federal government, which he dutifully loathes as a conservative, for assistance to cope with algal blooms connected to global warming, which he denies. Of course the disposition of Utah’s political leaders is similar, and so is the...
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New Challenges for the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 20.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
With more than 100,000 chemicals on the global market, it is a tremendous challenge to identify those that might cause harm to humans or wildlife. One class of chemicals, endocrine disruptors (chemicals that interfere with natural hormones), is receiving significant attention in the United States, European Union, and elsewhere. Expert panels from the  United Nations Environment Programme and World Health Organization , the  Endocrine Society , the  American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists , and  others  have concluded that the evidence linking endocrine disrupting chemicals to human diseases is strong. How do we determine if a chemical is an endocrine disruptor? How do we separate the 'bad actors' from all of the other non-hazardous compounds? Although this may seem like an easy task, in fact, it has proven to be quite difficult. In the US, for example, the Environmental Protection Agency has been working for 20 years to develop and implement the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). ...
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Increased Asthma Attacks Tied to Exposure to Natural Gas Production 20.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
A Marcellus Shale rig and gas well operation on Ridge Road in Jackson Township, operated by Rex Energy. (Photo: WCN 24/7 / Flickr ) Exposure to more intense shale gas development correlates with a higher risk of asthma attacks among asthma patients, according to a new study of Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale, one of the nation's largest and most active fracking regions. The paper,  published Monday  in JAMA Internal Medicine, a publication of the American Medical Association, didn't examine the exact cause of the trend. But lead author Sara Rasmussen, a Ph.D. candidate in environmental health sciences at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said air pollution and stress are both plausible explanations. Natural gas development releases various air pollutants including particulate matter, volatile organic compounds and sulfur dioxide. The equipment also produces loud noises and bright lights, which can increase anxiety and sleeplessness. Years of research show that all these factors can ...
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Why toxic algae blooms like Florida's are so dangerous to people and wildlife 20.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Ernst B. Peebles , University of South Florida Reported cases of algal blooms, when algae grow rapidly from an influx of nutrients in waterways, have been rising at an exponential rate in recent decades. Industrialized countries have the highest incidence with North America, Europe and eastern Asia being hotbeds for new cases due to runoff from industry and cities as well as these areas' intensive use of manufactured fertilizers. These events often cause a noticeable change in the color and smell of natural water bodies and may be accompanied by highly visible fish kills or even respiratory distress in humans who inhale tiny, aerosol particles created by wind and waves. A highly visible new case recently developed in Florida, where a particularly intense bloom of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) formed in Lake Okeechobee, the largest freshwater lake in the state. As is often the case with today's larger, more intense blooms, the event was visible to satellites orbiting in space. This year's Lake ...
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Using urban pigeons to monitor lead pollution 20.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Tom Lehrer sang about poisoning them, but those pigeons in the park might be a good way to detect lead and other toxic compounds in cities. A new study of pigeons in New York City shows that levels of lead in the birds track with neighborhoods where children show high levels of lead exposure."Pigeons breathe the same air, walk the same sidewalks, and often eat the same food as we do. What if we could use them to monitor possible dangers to our health in the environment, like lead pollution?" said Rebecca Calisi, now an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior at the University of California, Davis, who conducted the study with undergraduate student Fayme Cai while at Barnard College, Columbia University. The work is published July 18 in the journal Chemosphere.Decades after it was banned from paint and gasoline, lead pollution remains a significant concern. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene carries out routine screening of children in areas of ...
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Near Exide plant, dangerous lead levels in some yards are 100 times above health limits 20.7.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Homes, schools and at least one day-care center near a shuttered Vernon battery recycler are contaminated with higher levels of brain-damaging lead than previously disclosed, with soil samples at some properties found to be so hazardous they are as much as 100 times above California’s health...

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Additional waters closed as 'unprecedented' Utah Lake algal bloom moves north 20.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Algal monitoring efforts continue to move northward as state environmental officials strive to get a handle on what the largest algal bloom in Utah Lake’s history means for Utah water quality. This is the first known instance where a bloom originating in Utah Lake has affected the Jordan River and other downstream systems. And concentrations within the bloom are exceptionally high, with some samples surpassing tens of millions of cyanobacteria — the so-called toxin-producing algae — per millilit... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Farmers fear for crops as Utah Lake algae threat spreads to Salt Lake County 19.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Stephanie Cannon’s tomatoes may go dry this week if algae from Utah Lake make their way into her irrigation canal. “I wouldn’t feel uncomfortable about watering my lawn with” irrigation water from the canal, said Cannon, a commercial tomato grower and president of the Upper Canal Irrigation Co. in Millcreek and Holladay, “but I don’t want to put it on our tomatoes.” State water officials announced Sunday that algae from Utah Lake, where a toxic algal bloom was discovered last week, appear to hav... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Changing Environmental Values and a Changing World 18.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
People value the planet's air, water, creatures, and natural wonders. While pundits do not always understand how the environment works as a political issue, this past Earth Day, Karlyn Bowman of Forbes analyzed the political dynamics of American environmentalism and accurately reported the latent power of America's environmental values. Bowman observed: Each year since 1994, the Pew Research Center has asked about priorities for the President and Congress. Of the eighteen issues Pew examined in early 2016, 47% said "protecting the environment" should be a top priority. The issue ranked low--thirteenth of 18 issues the pollsters examined...These low rankings don't mean that Americans no longer care about the environment. Having a clean and healthful environment is a core value for most people. What the responses probably tell us is that Americans think policymakers, regulators, and activists are paying sufficient attention to environmental issues and that they want them to turn their attention to more ...
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This is how the U.S. must lead the fight against Zika 18.7.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Only America has the capabilities — financial and scientific — to curb the pending disaster, but we are wasting valuable time.
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