User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Nov 21 2014 23:06 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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A Poetic Exploration Of The Hunting Tradition In America's North 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photographer Clare Benson comes from a long line of hunters. Growing up in northern Michigan, she remembers her father, now 82 years old, winning archery championships and reminiscing about his time as a hunting guide in the Alaskan wilderness. For her, the tradition of hunting -- and the rugged northern landscape that serves as its backdrop -- represents themes of memory and mortality, ones she's managed to weave in and out of her work for some time. Her series "The Shepard's Daughter" addresses her connection to hunting most directly. The images show Benson, her sister and her father trekking through snow-covered scenes, respectfully carrying the spoils of hunting trips past. She pointedly juxtaposes portraits of her family members lounging in contemplation with photographs of the animals they hunt, skin, cook and eat. Set in a vast world unfamiliar to most urban dwellers, Benson paints a picture of a hunting tradition we don't often encounter. The Shepherd's Daughter, 2012 The project, she explained ...
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Triclosan linked to liver damage, cancer in mice 21.11.2014 LA Times: Science
The antimicrobial agent triclosan -- widely found in soaps, toothpastes, detergents and other cleansers beloved by germophobes, may promote scarring of the liver and the growth of cancerous liver tumors, says a new study.
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'Little Things Matter' Exposes Big Threat To Children's Brains 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Tiny amounts of lead, chemical flame retardants and organophosphate pesticides, among other toxins, course through the blood of nearly every American. But just how much worry is a little poison worth? A lot, especially when considering the cumulative effects of this chemical cocktail on children, warns a video unveiled Thursday during an environmental health conference in Ottawa, Canada. The seven-minute project, "Little Things Matter," draws on emerging scientific evidence that even mild exposures to common contaminants can derail normal brain development -- lowering IQs and raising risks of behavioral conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. "The chemical industry argues that the effect of toxins on children is subtle and of little consequence," co-producer Bruce Lanphear, an environmental health expert at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, states in the video. "But that is misleading." Drop a few tablespoons of sugar into an Olympic-size swimming pool, and you ...
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Lawsuit Calls on EPA to Clean Up Lead Air Pollution Across United States 21.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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This Will Make You Think Twice About Getting That Manicure 20.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Beauty can be painful: just ask anyone who’s ever sat in a salon getting their scalp seared with straightener or their fingers soaked in noxious chemicals. But the problems aren’t just skin deep; the glamor of the cosmetics industry hides many underlying health hazards. The materials used in salon treatments like perms and manicures are as dangerous as any industrial chemical. But unlike industrial workplaces where protective equipment is often the norm, at salons personal image and comfort are paramount. So regulation remains a gray area, consumers ignore those ugly fumes, and yet for workers who  labor  all day in these shops, practically every breath may carry toxic risks. Although the exact degree of risk salon workers face is unclear and varies across workplaces,  a report by the advocacy group Women’s Voices for the Earth  highlights troubling research findings. For example, “[s]ome surveys found that over 60 percent of salon workers suffer from skin conditions, such as dermatitis, on their hands,” ...
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Top 5 Ways to Ensure Safe, Natural Toys for Kids 20.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It never seems too early to start making your holiday gift lists (even if just in your head) because the holidays tend to creep up on us faster than we realize. Although I enjoy tackling my growing list and finding thoughtful gifts for loved ones, it can become a little overwhelming at times, especially when you need to pick out children's toys. Beyond stressing over whether your nephew wanted the blue or red toy truck, we face an unfortunate reality that now forces us to question if there are too many toxic chemicals in the toys we pull off store shelves. 'Chemicals of high concern' were found in thousands of children's products according to a study released in May 2013 by Environmental Health News (EHN ). Most of us have heard the tragic reporting of children falling ill or dying from lead poisoning through ingested toys, and although this is a very rare occurrence, the Centers for Disease Control still warns that "toys that have been made in other countries and then imported into the United States or ...
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'Stupidity' remark leads to free health site work 20.11.2014 Seattle Times: Politics
An economist who said "the stupidity of the American voter" helped pass the complex federal health care law has agreed to finish his work on Vermont's health insurance systems for free, a top state official said Wednesday.
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'Stupidity' remark leads to free health site work 20.11.2014 Yahoo: US National
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — An economist who said "the stupidity of the American voter" helped pass the complex federal health care law has agreed to finish his work on Vermont's health insurance systems for free, a top state official said Wednesday.
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18 Stunning India-Based Instagram Feeds You Should Be Following 19.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A photo posted by Subhash Chandra (@subhash_chandra) on Sep 9, 2014 at 7:34pm PDT 5. Hashim Badani: A self-described "chronicler of the mundane," Badani tends to shoot in and around Mumbai. Every once in a while though, the Lonely Planet contributor happens on somewhere completely surreal (see below). A photo posted by hashimbadani (@hashimbadani) on Nov 11, 2014 at 12:15am PDT 6. Siddhartha Joshi: This wandering photographer is another strong portraitist, whose subjects range from kids at play to the army men patrolling India's northern borders. A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Aug 8, 2014 at 5:56am PDT A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Oct 10, 2014 at 8:22am PDT 7. @my_mumbai: This popular feed features work by anyone who tags their photos #my_mumbai. The resulting account is sweeping, well-curated, and -- for anyone drawn to the world's densest locales -- undoubtedly worth a follow. A photo posted by #MyMumbai (@my_mumbai) on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:59am PDT A photo posted by #MyMumbai ...
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Is NYC Content to Lead the Nation in Raw Sewage Discharges? The Moment of Truth is Here - and the Jury is Still Out. 19.11.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Larry Levine, Senior Attorney, New York: There’s a dirty little secret when it comes to greening New York City.  Even as NYC has become a leader in building green infrastructure to combat sewer overflows, it seems to content to remain the nation’s leader in a much...
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Fenceline Communities Face an Ongoing Invisible Assault of Toxics Emanating from Refineries 18.11.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Diane Bailey, Senior Scientist, San Francisco: Drive past the other-worldly refinery landscape in Deer Park, Texas and you have to lunge for the recirc button to avoid the sickeningly-sweet chemical odors. That’s not an option for the more than 200,000 people living along the petrochemical complex...
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How to debunk medical (and other scientific) myths 18.11.2014 MinnPost
Long-debunked myths about health and medicine are widely — and stubbornly — held. Some can lead to harm, such as the false belief that childhood vaccinations can cause autism. Others usually just waste people’s time and money, such as the mistaken idea that taking vitamins or other supplements provides “added protection” against disease or that a “colon cleansing” eliminates toxins from the body. But how do you persuade people that such beliefs are based on misinformation? That’s a huge challenge. In his latest NeuroHacks column for the BBC Future website , British psychologist Tom Stafford explains what two researchers, Stephen Lewandowsky and John Cook , discovered on this topic a few years ago when they were exploring how to counter misinformation on climate change. Writes Stafford (with British spellings): The first thing their review turned up is the importance of “ backfire effects ” — when telling people that they are wrong only strengthens their belief. In one experiment, for example, researchers ...
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Toxic Tau Of Alzheimer's May Offer A Path To Treatment 18.11.2014 NPR: All Things Considered
Faulty forms of the brain protein tau trigger tangles inside and outside brain cells of Alzheimer's patients. Scientists say figuring out how to stop bad tau's spread from cell to cell might be key.
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New protection for migratory birds 15.11.2014 Environmental News Network
Two new international agreements will help to save migratory birds from hunting, trapping and poisoning, and to protect their long-distance flyways. A key objective is to phase out lead shot within three years, and eliminate the toxic drug diclofenac.
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Hotter Sex, Cooler Planet 15.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Originally published on TIME.com Earlier this year, NASA issued a report declaring that global warming isn't coming, it's already here. "This Is What a Holy Sh*t Moment for Global Warming Looks Like," according to a headline on Mother Jones. Two studies in the journals Science and Geophysical Research Letters reported that major glaciers that are part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appear to have become irrevocably destabilized. The collapse of these major glaciers now "appears unstoppable," according to NASA. An article in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association states, "Health is inextricably linked to climate change ," including respiratory disorders, infectious diseases, water-borne diseases and mental health disorders. Warmer oceans mean that sea levels will rise more than 3 feet in 200 years, or less, eventually triggering the collapse of the rest of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. When the ice sheet is gone, sea levels will rise between 9 and 15 feet, which will, over ...
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Ex-Chicago Mayor Byrne dies 14.11.2014 CNN: Top Stories
Former Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne -- the first and, even now, only woman to lead that city -- has died, the city's current mayor said Friday.
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Mohamed Nasheed: 'There's Nothing More Conservative Than Conserving The Planet' 14.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For Mohamed Nasheed, former president of the Maldives, stopping carbon emissions and adapting to climate change is a necessity. The Maldives sit at an average height of four feet above sea level , making them extremely vulnerable to rising seas. Nasheed, the the first democratically-elected president of the Maldives, called attention to the issue in 2009 by holding the first ever underwater cabinet meeting . Dressed in scuba gear, Nasheed called on world leaders to cut their carbon emissions. He was also the subject of a 2011 documentary about his work on climate change, called " The Island President ." Nasheed at the BLUE Ocean Film Festival Nasheed's historic presidency was cut short in 2012 when he resigned under contested circumstances , and his bid for reelection in 2013 was unsuccessful. Since then he has continued to advocate for democracy and action on climate change . Last week Nasheed came to the United States to receive the Sylvia Earle Award at the BLUE Ocean Film Festival & Conservation ...
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What We Really Know About Psychedelic Mushrooms 14.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
For centuries, "magic" mushrooms have been both celebrated and reviled for their mind-expanding properties. Research and popular use of psychedelic drugs like mushrooms and LSD surged in the 1960s, when the substances first entered the American cultural consciousness on a large scale, and came to define '60s counterculture. At this time, thousands of studies were conducted to determine the properties and potential therapeutic applications of the drugs. But in 1970, the Controlled Substances Act brought an end to this era of science-based open-mindedness, and greatly limited drug research for the next four decades. Today, research on psychedelic drugs is experiencing a renaissance of sorts . A growing body of scientific studies from major universities and medical centers suggests that the substances may hold promise as therapeutic interventions for a number of mental health conditions. 'Shrooms are known to trigger hallucinations, feelings of euphoria, perceptual distortions, inability to distinguish ...
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Poor contact lens care leads to a whole lot of eye infections 14.11.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Cutting corners is expensive. The cost of treating cornea infections tallies $175 million annually.
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