User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Apr 01 2015 06:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Stop Playing 'Whack-A-Mole' With Toxic Flame Retardants, Health Advocates Urge 1.4.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As the public has learned of health risks tied to chemicals in everyday products, many companies have responded by eliminating, one by one, the suspected cancer causers, brain damagers and hormone disruptors. But even prompt action doesn't entirely appease some health experts, who warn of a problematic pattern. "We're playing toxic whack-a-mole," said Arlene Blum, a chemist at the University of California, Berkeley, and executive director of the nonprofit Green Science Policy Institute. "When after a great deal of research and testing, a chemical is found to be harmful, then the tendency is to replace it with as similar a chemical as possible. That's the easiest thing to do." History has shown, however, that the substitutes may prove equally harmful. Take, for example, the widespread replacement of bisphenol A with bisphenol S in products such as hard plastic water bottles and cash register receipts . New research suggests the latter chemical may be just as harmful to human health . On Tuesday, a ...
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Rounding Us Up, and Exposing Us All to Cancer 31.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The World Health Organization has just declared the most widely used herbicide in the world, glyphosate, a "probable human carcinogen," a designation long overdue. Cancer is only one of many health consequences of the growing scourge of herbicides, pesticides and GMOs. (Image: Spraying herbicide via Shutterstock) A friend of mine sent me an email recently after being alarmed by observing a neighbor's son, as a city employee, spraying the herbicide Roundup along the Jordan River Parkway in the center of Salt Lake City. She asked him what he was spraying and he said, "nothing dangerous, just Roundup." He wasn't wearing any protection of any kind. The very same day, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that they had concluded the active ingredient in Roundup, glyphosate, the most widely sold agricultural and household herbicide in the world, billed as one of the most benign herbicides ever manufactured, was a "probable carcinogen." The WHO elaborated that their biggest concern was for occupational ...
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Our Food-Safety System Is A Patchwork With Big Holes, Critics Say 31.3.2015 NPR News
More than a dozen federal agencies play a part in keeping food from making Americans sick. Critics say the system has gaps, and we'd all be safer if federal food safety efforts were under one roof.
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Astrological Forecasts for 03/31/2015 30.3.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Astrological Forecasts for 03/31/2015
A big bank balance leads to big-brained babies 30.3.2015 New Scientist: Being Human
The world's largest study of brain structure and socioeconomic status shows parental wealth affects the size of s a child's brain - and their ...
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Crash co-pilot's personality 'serious lead' but not only one: French investigator 28.3.2015 World
"We have a certain number of elements which allow us to make progress on this lead, which is a serious lead but which can't be the only one," police chief Jean-Pierre Michel told AFP in the western German city of Duesseldorf. The investigation so far has not turned up a "particular element" in the life of co-pilot Andreas Lubitz which could explain his alleged action in the ill-fated Airbus plane, he ...
Paid Leave Announcements Confirm the Country is Ready for 21st Century Leave Policies 28.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The announcement that White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett and U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez will soon kick off a historic 'Lead On Leave' tour is exciting news that comes amidst strong, widespread demand and support for paid leave.* And the announcement by Microsoft that it will require many of its suppliers to offer a minimum standard of paid leave to their employees, is very welcome and meaningful progress that demonstrates that employer and employee interests are aligned. We heartily applaud both new initiatives. As a nation, we are primed and ready for 21st century leave policies. Employers like Microsoft and others that have made similar policy changes recently are helping lead the way. Earlier this month, Vodafone announced a new global paid maternity policy. Change.org made headlines for establishing an 18-week parental leave policy last year. And large and small companies have come out in support of paid leave standards, including Care.com . These companies are leading on leave and ...
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Monsanto fined for not reporting Idaho chemical releases 27.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Monsanto Co. has agreed to pay $600,000 in fines for not reporting hundreds of uncontrolled releases of toxic chemicals at its eastern Idaho phosphate plant.
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Portman Amendment Would Increase Health Risk for Americans -- EDF 27.3.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Portman Amendment Would Increase Health Risk for Americans -- EDF
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9/11 firefighters hit by autoimmune diseases 26.3.2015 New Scientist: Living World
Emergency crews who spent months clearing up after the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York have higher rates of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus
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Long Distance Government 26.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Senate resolution  S.697 , legislation to reauthorize and modernize the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), will create stumbling blocks for states that wish to protect their citizens and their families from harmful chemicals. In my opinion, this resolution is not unlike asking residents across the country to rely on first responders from Washington, D.C., to respond to their emergency when they call 911. Could you imagine needing the police or fire department and having to call Washington for help? It just doesn't make sense.  Proponents of the proposed legislation will tell you that it is all about creating one rule book -- not fifty-two. Although the idea of one rule book might sound like a solution, in reality this is more of a sound bite rather than anything that would be effective. We must not lose sight of the fact that we are talking about our children and other vulnerable populations, including pregnant women and the elderly. There is little substance in the idea of turning over the supervision ...
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Long Distance Government 26.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Senate resolution  S.697 , legislation to reauthorize and modernize the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), will create stumbling blocks for states that wish to protect their citizens and their families from harmful chemicals. In my opinion, this resolution is not unlike asking residents across the country to rely on first responders from Washington, D.C., to respond to their emergency when they call 911. Could you imagine needing the police or fire department and having to call Washington for help? It just doesn't make sense.  Proponents of the proposed legislation will tell you that it is all about creating one rule book -- not fifty-two. Although the idea of one rule book might sound like a solution, in reality this is more of a sound bite rather than anything that would be effective. We must not lose sight of the fact that we are talking about our children and other vulnerable populations, including pregnant women and the elderly. There is little substance in the idea of turning over the supervision ...
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Polluters Again Challenge Common Sense Public Health Protections at the Supreme Court 25.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Supreme Court will hear polluter arguments against the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) vital Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), a long-overdue protection finalized in 2012 that will help guard our families, air, water, and wildlife from dangerous toxic pollution that comes from coal plants. These vital protections are critically important to public health, and the polluters challenging them are putting lives at risk. The mercury, arsenic, and other poisonous metal and acid gas pollution that these protections are meant to control pose serious dangers to pregnant women and young children. EPA scientists have estimated that as many as one in 10 women have mercury levels in their blood high enough to cause damage to a developing baby. I know I worried about this when I was pregnant with my daughter five years ago, and I still worry about it now as she grows up. That's why thousands of Sierra Club supporters worked with our partner organizations for years to push for these standards. ...
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U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Arguments Over EPA Mercury Limits 25.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge by industry groups and Republican-led states that want to roll back Obama administration environmental rules aimed at reducing power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants that contribute to respiratory illnesses, birth defects and developmental problems in children. The justices are hearing arguments Wednesday in a case about the authority of the Environmental Protection Agency to take action against coal- and oil-fired power plants that are responsible for half the nation's output of mercury. The EPA's rules on emissions of chromium, arsenic, acid gases, nickel, cadmium as well as mercury and other toxic substances is supposed to begin taking effect in April, and be in full force next year. The court is to decide whether the Clean Air Act requires that costs be a factor in the initial decision on whether to regulate hazardous air pollutants from power plants, or whether health risks are the only consideration. The EPA ...
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Justices to hear arguments over EPA mercury limits 25.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge by industry groups and Republican-led states that want to roll back Obama administration environmental rules aimed at reducing power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants that contribute to respiratory illnesses, birth defects and developmental problems in children.
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Supreme Court to Decide Profits vs People 25.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Could Kill 75 Million Over The Next 35 Years 24.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Astrid Zweynert LONDON, March 24 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Over the next 35 years, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis will kill 75 million people and could cost the global economy a cumulative $16.7 trillion - the equivalent of the European Union's annual output, a UK parliamentary group said on Tuesday. If left untackled, the spread of drug-resistant TB superbugs threatens to shrink the world economy by 0.63 percent annually, the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Global Tuberculosis (APPG TB) said, urging governments to do more to improve research and cooperation. "The rising global burden of multidrug-resistant TB and other drug-resistant infections will come at a human and economic cost which the global community simply cannot afford to ignore," economist Jim O'Neill said in a statement. O'Neill, a former chief at investment bank Goldman Sachs, was appointed last year by British Prime Minister David Cameron to head a review into antimicrobial resistance. The bacteria that cause TB ...
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Angry Outbursts Really Do Hurt Your Health, Doctors Find 24.3.2015 Wall St. Journal: Asia
From heart disease to sleep problems, medical researchers increasingly are finding just how toxic anger can be.
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EDF and Many Others Defend the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards at the Supreme Court 23.3.2015 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
On Wednesday (March 25th) EDF and a large group of allies will be at the U.S. Supreme Court as the Justices hear oral arguments on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. EDF has been helping defend these life-saving standards since they were first challenged ­– and upheld – in the U.S. […]
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