User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Aug 27 2016 07:07 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 16,667    
TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
Also found in: [+]
Test results from Tibble Fork Dam sediment trigger warnings in American Fork Canyon 27.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Water and sediment samples taken from American Fork Canyon show its river has been fouled with lead and other heavy metals thanks to a major sediment spill last week during a dam rehabilitation project, according to a report released Friday by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Levels of cadmium, zinc, lead, copper, nickel and arsenic in the river sediments exceed health standards for aquatic life, according to test results. And while metal concentrations in the water were up to 10 ti...
Also found in: [+]
EPA's Inaction Made Way for Lead Poisoning in Children, Lawsuit Claims 26.8.2016 Truthout.com
Research shows that children can suffer lead poisoning from lower levels of exposure than previously believed dangerous. Although the EPA agreed to initiate new standards for assessing lead-related dangers back in 2009, nothing has been forthcoming. Advocates say the federal government has dropped the ball. (Photo: Gregory Roberts ) Environmental justice and public health groups are demanding that the federal government update regulations and expand efforts to protect young children from lead poisoning, which can cause irreversible cognitive and behavioral problems and tends to be more common in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. In a lawsuit filed on Wednesday, a coalition of groups asked a federal court in California to mandate that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) update its standards for assessing dangerous levels of lead dust on surfaces in homes and residential buildings, especially those built before 1978, when regulators began restricting the amount of lead in lead-based ...
Also found in: [+]
A transcript of Jill Stein's meeting with The Washington Post editorial board 26.8.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
A transcript of Jill Stein's meeting with The Washington Post editorial board
Also found in: [+]
Indiana gives $200K to help families amid lead contamination 26.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

EAST CHICAGO, Ind. (AP) — The state of Indiana is providing $200,000 to the city of East Chicago to help families living at a public housing complex where soil is tainted with elevated levels of lead and arsenic. The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority says its board on Thursday approved the allocation of $100,000 […]
Also found in: [+]
Non Profits Sue General Mills for False and Misleading Use of ‘Natural’ 25.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Non Profits Sue General Mills for False and Misleading Use of ‘Natural’
Also found in: [+]
News roundup: Sen. Jeff Flake relishes role as anti-Trump guy 25.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
<iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Selecting the right house plant could improve indoor air 24.8.2016 Environmental News Network
Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of "sick building syndrome." But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics. A brand-new animation on the research is available at http://bit.ly/ACSindoorairpollution."Buildings, whether new or old, can have high levels of VOCs in them, sometimes so high that you can smell them," says ...
Also found in: [+]
5 houseplants for removing indoor air pollution 24.8.2016 TreeHugger
New research finds that certain houseplants are best for removing specific harmful compounds.
Also found in: [+]
Flint Water Could Have Caused Rashes, Investigators Say 24.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― The water in Flint, Michigan, could have caused skin problems when the city used the Flint River as its water source, federal investigators concluded after an extensive study .  Many residents have continued to complain of ailments. But the researchers say they don’t know how Flint’s water could still be causing rashes since the city switched back to more stable Lake Huron water in October 2015.  “Fortunately, water samples from the city’s current water did not show metals and minerals at levels that would cause or make rashes worse,” Dr. Nicole Lurie, of the Department of Health and Human Services, said in a statement. “Residents who are still suffering from rashes or hair loss or have other health concerns should visit a doctor or a community health center for care and possible referral to a dermatologist, Lurie said.  People in Flint noticed problems with the water immediately after the city started pumping from the Flint River in a state-approved plan to save money. The river water was ...
Also found in: [+]
Illegal drugs flow into California's death row despite high security - and some condemned prisoners die 24.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Condemned murderer Michael Jones was acting strangely and profusely sweating when guards escorted him in chains to the San Quentin medical unit that doubles as the psych ward on death row.

“Doggone, I don’t think you’re ever going to see me again,” he told a fellow inmate, Clifton Perry.

Hours...

Also found in: [+]
New EPA Guidelines: An Opportunity to Reduce Smog, Protect Public Health 23.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Peter Zalzal and David Lyon With families across the country starting back to school this week, the official summer season may be gone, but the ozone season is still in full swing. Ozone, more commonly known as “smog” is a harmful air pollutant that results in respiratory ailments like asthma and can even lead to premature death . For too many Americans, ozone pollution makes the activities that we enjoy doing outdoors in the summer difficult or even impossible.  And in recent years, ozone—once a summertime phenomenon impacting mostly larger cities—now affects rural parts of the country and can persist throughout the year.  In fact, rural Wyoming and Utah have experienced elevated ozone levels in the winter on par with some of the larger cities in the country.  A number of different industrial sources can contribute to this pollution, but in certain areas, emissions from the oil and natural gas sector are a significant factor. Fortunately, this summer, EPA finalized the nation’s first-ever standards ...
Also found in: [+]
The Daily 202: Russian meddling in U.S. election backfiring on Putin, hurting Trump 23.8.2016 Washington Post: Politics
A Rust Belt backlash by ethnic Eastern Europeans
Also found in: [+]
Forget GMOs. Pesticides Pose the Real Risk 23.8.2016 American Prospect
A tractor spreads chemicals on his crop as Hastings, Florida, resident Brian Hunt watches.    The latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture reveal that Americans’ appetite for locally grown, organic food is growing. Consumers want to know where their food comes from and what’s in it. Most polls show that the vast majority of Americans also support mandatory labels for genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Nearly half of Americans think scientists have found risks associated with eating GM foods even though they haven’t, according to a recent survey by the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. “People don’t know very much about the science, and they don’t know that GMOs have been in the food supply for 20 years,” says William Hallman, who ran the survey. “They just know they don’t like it.” Last month, after years of contentious debate, President Obama signed legislation requiring the first national GMO labeling standard. (Labeling advocates aren’t happy with the ...
Also found in: [+]
East Chicago children have lead in their blood from contaminated dirt. Is this the next Flint? 23.8.2016 Washington Post
East Chicago children have lead in their blood from contaminated dirt. Is this the next Flint?
Also found in: [+]
Toxic algae rises again at Utah Lake 23.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Toxic algae appears to be surging again in Utah Lake, prompting the Utah County Health Department to issue health advisories for specific portions of the lake. Warning signs have been posted at both Sandy Beach and the Saratoga Springs Marina. Lincoln Beach — which never really opened after July’s massive algal bloom, according to health department spokeswoman Aislynn Tolman-Hill — remains closed. Box Lake also acquired warning signs this afternoon due to increasingly high levels of toxic algae ...
Also found in: [+]
The best science stories you may have missed amid all the sports and politics 22.8.2016 Washington Post
The best science stories you may have missed amid all the sports and politics
Also found in: [+]
Air Force alone in halting use of foam that tainted wells 22.8.2016 Philly.com News
The Air Force said last week that it would stop using the potentially dangerous firefighting foam that over years contaminated some local water supplies, but no other military branch has a public plan to ban the foam at its bases.
Also found in: [+]
Legendary band's singer says goodbye 21.8.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip played its last tour stop at the hometown of lead singer Gord Downie.
Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip holds final show 21.8.2016 AP Top News
KINGSTON, Ontario (AP) -- A delirious sold-out crowd and countless Canadians on live TV watched the final concert by rock band The Tragically Hip, whose lead singer and songwriter Gord Downie has been diagnosed with terminal brain cancer....
1 to 20 of 16,667