User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Oct 01 2014 15:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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TRAIN Act Colossal Waste of Money, Attempt to Delay Regulations 21.9.2100 Union of Concerned Scientists
The House is expected to take up a bill today, called the TRAIN Act, which would waste $2 million of taxpayer money by mandating redundant cost-benefit analyses of environmental and health regulations.
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Organic foods found to have less toxic cadmium than conventional crops 1.10.2014 TreeHugger
Fertilizers used in conventional farming are exposing us to higher levels of this heavy metal.
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Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Could Save 3,500 Lives Per Year: Report 1.10.2014 Health

Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Could Save 3,500 Lives Per Year: ReportWASHINGTON –- Save the planet, save lives?A study released Tuesday says reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants in order to curb global warming also would improve health for Americans. That's because reducing greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide would lead to declines in other pollutants -- saving up to 3,500 American lives per...


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Oil and gas companies not walking the walk when it comes to recycling fracking wastewater 30.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Amy Mall, Senior Policy Analyst, Washington, D.C.: According to a recent article in the Greeley Tribune, the oil and gas industry in Weld County, Colorado is producing more wastewater than it can handle. Weld County is a hotbed of the industry, with 21,595 active oil and gas wells,...
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Winged Warnings: Built for Survival, Birds in Trouble From Pole to Pole 30.9.2014 Truthout.com
Sole descendents of the dinosaurs, birds have penetrated nearly every ecosystem on Earth and then tailored their own size, habits and colors to each one, pollinating, dispersing seeds, controlling bugs, cleaning up carrion and fertilizing plants, all the while singing notes so beguiling that hearing them makes even the urban dweller pause to listen. Birds are the planet’s superheroes, built for survival. But for all their superhuman powers, they are in trouble. Startled by a glacier calving, the black-legged kittiwakes took to the sky in a flurry of activity, St Jonsfjorden, Prins Karls Forland in Greenland. (Photo: Marie and Alistair Knock ) Truthout only exists thanks to the support of our readers. Help us continue to publish truly independent journalism by making a tax-deductible donation today! The ice of Antarctica doesn’t faze birds. Nor does the heat of the tropics. They thrive in the desert, in swamps, on the open ocean, on sheer rock faces, on treeless tundra, atop airless mountaintops and ...
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Time for GE to Give the Hudson an A-Level Cleanup 30.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Peter Lehner, Executive Director, New York City: Late last month, I visited one of the largest Superfund sites in the United States—the 197-mile stretch of the Hudson River where General Electric (GE) dumped more than 1.3 million pounds of toxic PCBs, from the mid-1940s through most of...
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European activists say they don't want any US 'chlorine chicken' 30.9.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The chlorine vs. no chlorine debate has risen to the surface in the context of a trans-Atlantic trade agreement, which would create the world's biggest trade-free zone.
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European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken' 30.9.2014 NPR Health Science
Most U.S. poultry is bathed in a little chlorine on the way to your plate. But that treatment is banned in Europe. Now "chlorinated chickens" are a sticking point in a trans-Atlantic trade deal.
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Financial Relief Finally Coming for Camp Lejeune Toxic Water Victims 27.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Washington - The Department of Veterans Affairs on Tuesday announced it will soon start to cover out-of-pocket health care costs for Marine dependents who contracted cancer and other illnesses from toxic water at Camp Lejeune, as promised two years ago by law. In 2012, Congress passed the landmark Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act. It provided health care for Marines and family members who had lived on the base near Jacksonville, N.C., from 1957-1987 and who suffered from any of 15 illnesses named in the law. These included cancer related to the lungs, bladder, breasts, kidneys and esophagus, as well leukemia and problems involving female infertility. An estimated 750,000 people were exposed to drinking water at the base that was polluted with chemicals that included industrial solvents and benzene from fuels. The chemicals resulted from spills, a dump site on base, leaking underground storage tanks on base and an off-base dry cleaner. Under the 2012 law, the VA ...
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Evidence Mounts of Hidden Fracking Hazards 27.9.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Does your child have 'toxic stress"? 27.9.2014 CNN: Top Stories
Chances are, you know someone whose child has been diagnosed with attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder. Perhaps you've received that news about yourself or your own child. In many cases, it's a legitimate issue and can require medication, therapy or both. But in my experience, ADHD is sometimes a diagnosis that can be mistakenly given based on a pattern of behavior, without appropriate understanding of the underlying biology.
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Mass Dog Vaccination Could Eliminate Rabies Globally 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Rachael Rettner, Senior Writer Published: 09/25/2014 02:20 PM EDT on LiveScience It is possible to eliminate cases of the deadly rabies virus in people worldwide through mass vaccinations of dogs, some researchers argue. Rabies cases are extremely rare in developed countries — in the United States, there was just one rabies case in 2013, and the patient acquired the disease while in Guatemala, according to researchers from Washington State University. Effective rabies vaccines have been available for years, but the virus still kills more than 69,000 people yearly worldwide, most of them children in Africa and Asia. The rabies vaccine can be given to people after a possible exposure to the virus, and is extremely effective in preventing the disease from taking hold. But once a person begins to show symptoms of rabies — which can include delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations and partial paralysis — the disease is almost always fatal. "The irony is that rabies is 100 percent preventable. People ...
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Veteran Seeks Answers on Depleted Uranium 26.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Scrambling Birds' Brains: Could This Toxic Algae Offer Clues to Human Diseases? 26.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
J.Strom Thurmond Lake, Georgia - From their perch in a loblolly pine, two bald eagles swoop low over a floating flock of wintering coots. Most of the water birds scatter, but a few are left struggling on the surface. They flail on their backs, their wings twitching. They sense danger, but they cannot flee. Choosing its prey, an eagle dives over one of the sick coots, skewering it with sharp talons. A mysterious toxin – with no name and no cure – lurking in lakes in the South has drilled holes in the brains of these waterbirds, rendering them unable to swim, eat and fly. In turn, this poison likely will also destroy the brain of the eagle that ate the coot. Lacy holes that look like soap bubbles dot the tightly knit meshwork of the coots' brain tissues, blocking the neurological signals transmitted between regions of their brains. Since avian vacuolar myelinopathy, or AVM, was discovered in 1994, 76 dead eagles and hundreds of coots and other water birds at Thurmond Lake alone have been attributed to the ...
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Yacht Club Worker Rescues Dying Bald Eagle In Maryland 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While opening up a fuel dock at the Maryland Yacht Club in Pasadena a maintenance worker discovered a 5-year-old bald eagle fighting for its life. Ernie Jenkins told local media he saw the exhausted bird flapping around in the water near the club, where Maryland's Rock Creek empties into the Chesapeake Bay . Using a net, Jenkins was able to lift the bird out of the water to safety. "I didn't want to watch him drown," Jenkins told local paper The Capital Gazette. "If I didn't get him out, he would have died and that was it." Tests showed the eagle was suffering from a respiratory illness and lead poisoning, which can lead to brain damage. A rescue team has the bird under surveillance while it is being treated. “He might of got a rabbit that had pellets in him, or a fishing weight off of someone’s fishing line,” Jenkins told CBS Baltimore of the possible cause of the lead poisoning. "[The eagle's] condition at this point is poor and our prognosis is that we're hopeful, but also trying to be realistic in ...
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"Restricted use": right direction, but won't protect our kids and communities from toxic pesticide 25.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Veena Singla, Staff Scientist, Health Program, San Francisco: When the average person hears that the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) is making chlorpyrifos a “restricted use” pesticide, they tend to think that it’s a good thing. And, in general, it is. But despite its impressive-sounding name, “restricted use”...
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Obama: Ebola is ‘growing threat to regional and global security’ 25.9.2014 Washington Post
NEW YORK — President Obama warned a summit of world leaders Thursday that the Ebola outbreak that has infected thousands in west Africa has gone beyond a health crises and is a “growing threat to regional and global ...
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9/11 illness kills 3 retired firefighters in 1 day 25.9.2014 AP National
NEW YORK (AP) -- Three retired firefighters who worked at ground zero have died on the same day from 9/11-related illnesses, fire officials said Thursday....
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Living Death: The Real Costs of Fracking 25.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
The Real Cost of Fracking by Michelle Bamberger and Robert Oswald paves the way for the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry to be put on trial for its role in endangering the health of American families, animals, food and water systems. Destroying life with full consciousness of doing so is, in my opinion, evil - a word Bamberger and Oswald never use, but which may come to mind as you read this massive indictment of an industry so vast that it has penetrated every part of American life (think: the fuel in your car and stove, as well as the food on your table). (Image: Beacon Press) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to fund more stories like it! The Real Cost of Fracking by Michelle Bamberger and Robert Oswald paves the way for the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry to be put on trial for its role in endangering the health of American families, animals, food and water systems. In 1997, my husband and I got three Siamese kittens. Two ...
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Research Institutions Will Have To Identify 'Dual-Use' Pathogens 25.9.2014 NPR Health Science
Scientists are deeply divided on whether lab-made flu viruses are legitimate medical research or national security threats. A new federal policy asks institutions to evaluate those risks early on.
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