User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Jan 19 2017 06:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The 44th President's impact in areas that hit home 19.1.2017 CNN: Top Stories
President Barack Obama, the 44th commander in chief of the United States, caps off eight years in office on January 20.
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Brother’s death leads Colorado software engineer to connect victims of opioid abuse through maps 15.1.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
In less than two years, the website has grown to include the profiles of 416 people who died because of oxycodone, heroin, morphine and other opioids.
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Colorado jail deaths steadily increased, more than doubled from 2011 to June of 2015 15.1.2017 Denver Post: Local
Jail deaths in Colorado grew from 11 inmates in 2011 to 24 in 2015, according to data compiled by The Denver Post. During the same period, Colorado's jail population declined.
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Marijuana's health effects? Top scientists weigh in 13.1.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine sorted through 10,000 studies to determine the good and bad health effects of marijuana. Tight drug restrictions impede research, they say.
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California Mobilizes for War Against Trump 13.1.2017 Mother Jones
Here in America's most populous state, the wealthy pay the nation's highest income tax rate, the minimum wage will soon rise to $15 an hour statewide, more than a quarter of the population is foreign born, and the economy is booming. California, the world's sixth-largest economy and a bastion of progressivism, is now being hailed as a kind of great blue firewall—Democrats' most important bulwark against the retrograde policies of Donald Trump. "If you want to take on a forward-leaning state that is prepared to defend its rights and interests, then come at us," Xavier Becerra, the state's incoming attorney general , taunted the president-elect in December. "One thing that should be made very clear is that one election won't change the values of the state of California," Kevin de León, the Senate president pro tempore, told Mother Jones. "What we would say to the incoming Trump administration is that we hope you find value in what we do in California—by growing the economy, creating real jobs that can be ...
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Marijuana Eases Pain, But Jury's Out On Other Health Benefits, Scientists Say 13.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marijuana has proved to be a powerful aid in easing chronic pain and helping battle nausea, but results are mixed or largely inconclusive on other health benefits, as well as detriments, according to a massive new scientific review of cannabis studies. The report , released Thursday by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, analyzes an astounding 10,000 scientific studies on the drug. “The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research” concludes that marijuana definitely provides some health benefits, though other claims about the drug are far less clear. The scientists note that much information could be determined if researchers didn’t have to battle restrictions caused by federal classification of cannabis as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning it “currently” has “no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” “It is often difficult for researchers to gain access to the quantity, quality, and type of cannabis product ...
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Experts have only a hazy idea of marijuana's myriad health effects, and federal laws are to blame 13.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

More than 22 million Americans use some form of marijuana each month, and it’s now approved for medicinal or recreational use in 28 states plus the District of Columbia. Nationwide, legal sales of the drug reached an estimated $7.1 billion last year.

Yet for all its ubiquity, a comprehensive new...

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Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In 13.1.2017 NPR News
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine sorted through 10,000 studies to determine the good and bad health effects of marijuana. Tight drug restrictions impede research, they say.
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The good, bad and unknown about marijuana's health effects 12.1.2017 Yahoo: US National
NEW YORK (AP) — It can almost certainly ease chronic pain and might help some people sleep, but it's also likely to raise the risk of getting schizophrenia and might trigger heart ...
The good, bad and unknown about marijuana's health effects 12.1.2017 AP National
NEW YORK (AP) -- It can almost certainly ease chronic pain and might help some people sleep, but it's also likely to raise the risk of getting schizophrenia and might trigger heart attacks....
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I've seen the opioid epidemic as a cop. Living it as a patient has been even worse. 11.1.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
This is what happens when pain meets bad health policy and bad drug laws.
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Medicine Or Health Risk? Parents Prescribed Medical Marijuana Are Clashing With Federal Agencies 10.1.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Medical marijuana use in the United States is more prevalent than ever before. Twenty-six states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes, seven of which have also legalized it for recreational use. But parents prescribed medical marijuana are beginning to see a backlash against the drug that could cost them custody of their children. Health conditions including epilepsy and chronic pain can be so severe that people with these diagnoses can struggle to live a normal life. For some patients with these conditions accessing medical marijuana can make the difference between independent mobility and debilitating pain. Relatively minimal short-term side effects can make marijuana an appealing alternative to harsher pharmaceutical treatment options. Other patients may choose to use a marijuana-based medication instead of prescription opioids to avoid the risk of developing an addiction. More than 20,000 people died from an overdose related to prescription opioids in 2015. Meta-analyses of state-wide date ...
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GOP leaders look to move faster on replacing Obamacare 10.1.2017 CNN: Top Stories
Senate Republican leaders, under growing criticism for not having their own alternative to Obamacare, are actively exploring moving more quickly to replace key elements of the law earlier in the year.
Fentanyl Overdoses Are Rising And Science Can't Keep Up 9.1.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Bribery. Conspiracy. Racketeering. Those are just three of the accusations that federal prosecutors leveled against two Alabama physicians in April as part of a 22-count criminal indictment  ― alleging that Drs. John Couch and Xiulu Ruan ran an opioid pill mill in exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars in kickbacks from a pharmaceutical company. Couch and Ruan were arrested in 2015 after prescribing Medicare patients a combined $4.9 million in Subsys  ― a potent form of fentanyl, taken via mouth spray and designed to treat severe cancer pain ― between 2013 and 2014. Some of those prescriptions were “diverted and/or abused by drug traffickers and addicts,” prosecutors say, and may have contributed to the opioid crisis currently gripping the nation. Couch and Ruan deny the allegations.  A third doctor, Michigan neurologist Dr. Gavin Awerbuch, pleaded guilty in November to health care fraud and to prescribing Subsys without a legitimate medical purpose. Awerbuch prescribed more Subsys than any other ...
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Blender Girl is back with 5 easy resolutions to boost your health in 2017 7.1.2017 LA Times: Health

What “elimination” diet are you trying in 2017? No sugar? No gluten? No dairy?

It all sounds like “no fun” to Tess Masters.

Masters — better known in the online world as L.A.’s Blender Girl — is back for the second year in a row to help Saturday readers kick off the new year in style.

She says...

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Offering Syringes Along With Prayers, Churches Help IV Drug Users 5.1.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Kaiser Health News FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. — When Gov. Pat McCrory signed legislation in July legalizing syringe exchange programs in North Carolina, James Sizemore rejoiced. The pastor of a small church, Sizemore had — with the tacit approval of some, but not all, local law enforcement — been offering clean syringes to drug users to help them avoid contracting HIV and hepatitis C. Now he could do so without fear of arrest. Sizemore, who in 2007 launched Radiant Church, an affiliate of the Church of God of Prophecy, has sought to alleviate the effects of drug addiction, work that he sees as a natural extension of his other pursuits: feeding, clothing and otherwise offering sustenance to his parishioners and others in need. “It was never an issue of, ‘Is this the right thing to do spiritually, scripturally?’” Sizemore said of his efforts. “For us, it was the right thing to do … You can’t save somebody’s soul if they’re dead.” Churches and other faith-based organizations have increasingly voiced approval of ...
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Colorado’s opioid and heroin overdose deaths outnumbered homicides in 2015 3.1.2017 Denver Post: Local
Colorado's opiate-overdose epidemic, while not as severe as in other parts of the country, is remaking the measures of death in the state and beginning to rival what are often believed to be more common ways to die.
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2016 year in review 1.1.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Scott Franz's top stories from 2016 City Council plagued by controversies The Steamboat Springs City Council hired a new city manager, advanced police station plans and spent many hours discussing the future of Howelsen Hill this year. But it was the council’s decision to call “dibs” on free Strings concert tickets and summer concert VIP lanyards that appeared to draw the strongest reaction from the community. Councilman Scott Ford even labeled the decision as “boneheaded.” After being strongly criticized for the decision, the council did one of its two revotes of the year and voted instead to adopt a new council policy that the city not accept free tickets to events it sponsors with taxpayer money. The initial story about the council’s dibs decision was Steamboat Today’s sixth most-read story of the year and the top-read story about city government. It was also only one of several stories about ethical controversies on the council. The council also found itself in hot water concerning potential ...
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Rural New Mexico exports mentoring model for physicians 1.1.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

ESPANOLA, N.M. (AP) — The heart of an unborn child beat strong and steady through an amplified monitor, as physician Leslie Hayes examined a pregnant 40-year-old who recently was weaned from heroin with help from anti-craving medication. Hayes and her colleagues treat more than 200 patients for drug-use disorders involving heroin and prescription opioid pain […]
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Rural New Mexico exports mentoring model for physicians 1.1.2017 Health

Rural New Mexico exports mentoring model for physiciansThe heart of an unborn child beat strong and steady through an amplified monitor, as physician Leslie Hayes examined a pregnant 40-year-old who recently was weaned from heroin with help from anti-craving ...


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