User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Mar 06 2015 04:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Growing the Herb: Marijuana and Indian Country 6.3.2015 Twin Cities Daily Planet
The Circle “I think that decriminalizing recreational use would benefit our people greatly since so many of us use it and many have been incarcerated for possessing it. MORE » “I think that decriminalizing recreational use would benefit our people greatly since so many of us use it and many have been incarcerated for possessing it. The tribes certainly could gain by better controlling how it exists within our communities as well as financially with sales and possible taxation … We have retained aboriginal rights to utilize medicines within our communities the way we see fit.” Martin Reinhardt, Professor at Northern Michigan University It’s time to reconsider the regulation of marijuana and hemp. With the Pineole Pomo Tribe of California initiating the first tribal commercial marijuana grow operation and the Department of Justice’s announcement that it would not prosecute for marijuana or hemp, the door has been opened to look at the regulatory scheme. This December, Justice Department Director Monty ...
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Huge Stakes As Supreme Court Takes Third Crack At Obamacare 4.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Obamacare faces its strangest challenge yet when the Supreme Court takes up the law for the third time Wednesday, but the oddity of the lawsuit shouldn’t obscure the cataclysm that a loss for President Barack Obama would provoke. The Supreme Court case is the latest legal effort by political opponents of the Affordable Care Act to ruin Obama’s signature domestic achievement. If successful, the suit would tarnish Obama’s legacy, foment infighting among Republicans, aggravate bitter partisanship between the GOP Congress and the White House, and threaten chaos in the health insurance market. But the worst consequences would fall on the estimated 9.6 million people who would lose their health insurance . The lawsuit, King v. Burwell , isn’t like the previous two Obamacare cases that came before the Supreme Court. Three years ago, in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court’s four liberals in upholding the constitutionality of the ...
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My drug-filled nanospheres heal at the speed of light 2.3.2015 New Scientist: News
Our bodies have a habit of scattering medicine to the wrong places, so Adah Almutairi is targeting diseases with light-activated ...
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Young girl's story may lead Idaho to approve marijuana oil 2.3.2015 AP National
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Ten-year-old Alexis Carey has a rare but intractable form of epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome. The genetic disease causes severe and multiple seizures, which often leave parents guessing if the terror of watching their child seize up will pass or turn fatal....
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Young girl's story may lead Idaho to approve marijuana oil 1.3.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Ten-year-old Alexis Carey has a rare but intractable form of epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome. The genetic diseases causes severe and multiple seizures, which often leave parents guessing if the terror of watching their child seize up will pass or turn ...
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Despite U.N. Treaties, War Against Drugs a Losing Battle 28.2.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Utah Medical Marijuana Bill Moving Forward 28.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Local panel dissects legal marijuana 27.2.2015 Durango Herald
About 50 people crowded into the Student Union Ballroom of Fort Lewis College for “What’s Up with Marijuana,” a panel on legalized pot that included experts with vastly different outlooks on its benefits and costs.Jonny Radding of Durango Organics, Maggie Gallagher and Tracy Robinette of Santé, and Lucas Mason...
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Medical pot proposal passes first test in conservative Utah 27.2.2015 Yahoo: US National
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A panel of Utah lawmakers gave initial approval Thursday to a proposal that would allow residents of the conservative state who have chronic and debilitating diseases to consume edible medical marijuana ...
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Kentucky Considers Changes To Drug Courts For Heroin Addicts 25.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- The Kentucky court system is reconsidering how its drug courts treat defendants thanks to a new federal policy that is pushing them to offer medications to opiate addicts. The state currently bars medication-assisted treatments for addicts in its drug courts. State judges order defendants off medications like Suboxone and methadone when placing them in their diversion programs. In early February, Michael Botticelli, the director of the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy, said that drug courts that receive federal money can no longer ban defendants from using treatments like Suboxone. The medication can eliminate cravings and, along with methadone, is seen by the medical establishment as the standard of care for opiate addicts. Although the vast majority of Kentucky’s drug courts do not receive federal funding, a state spokeswoman for the court system said they are currently reviewing their practices. “Kentucky drug court is evaluating the very recent news regarding federal ...
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Kenneth Finn and Bob Doyle: Pot policy harmful 25.2.2015 Steamboat Pilot
In response to your recent editorial, “Pot experiment seems to be working,” we are concerned that the general public is unaware of the numerous and growing problems since marijuana commercialization began in Colorado five years ago under the guise of medicine. One point in particular, is that with any “experiment,” one should care about the outcome, which does not appear to be the case here. We need to be concerned not just by a reckless industry but the growing science around the serious harms caused by marijuana. As we have learned with tobacco and alcohol, the industry will make money, and the costs will fall on our families, schools, employers and health care system. In Colorado, we mass produce marijuana-infused children’s products like gummy bears, cupcakes and soda as well as marijuana that can be five to 15 times more potent than the marijuana of the ’70s, ’80s, ’90s. What has happened since we began the mass commercialization of marijuana in 2009-10 under the guise of medicine and expanded the ...
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ERROR: Missing Story Title 25.2.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
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Marijuana May Be The Least Dangerous Recreational Drug, Study Shows 25.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Marijuana is far safer than alcohol, tobacco and multiple other illicit substances, researchers say, and strict, legal regulation of cannabis might be a more reasonable approach than current prohibitions. Those are the findings of a new report published in Scientific Reports that compares the lethality of the recreational use of 10 common drugs, including marijuana, alcohol, tobacco, heroin, cocaine, ecstasy, methamphetamine, diazepam, amphetamine and methadone. Researchers found that marijuana has the lowest risk of mortality and is safer than the commonly used alcohol and tobacco as well as the rest of the drugs in the study. They determined the risk of mortality by comparing the lethal dose of each substance with a commonly used amount of each substance. The finding that marijuana has the lowest risk when compared with the other drugs is not surprising -- previous research had found that marijuana is a substantially safer recreational drug than other commonly used recreational drugs examined in this ...
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1,000 Minnesota patients interested in medical marijuana 24.2.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
State survey offers first look at cannabis program.
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In Minnesota, marijuana will help treat effects of MS, cancer 24.2.2015 MinnPost
Minnesota’s new medical marijuana law, which has been described as “the most restrictive marijuana law in the country,”  will mostly benefit patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis or severe muscle spasms, according to 1,361 responses to an informal survey conducted by the Minnesota Department of Health. MPR reports, “The Health Department estimates as many as 5,000 patients may be certified as eligible for the drug…” Other ailments topping the list included cancer, epilepsy or seizures, glaucoma, Crohn's disease, and terminal illness. The New York Times looks at efforts nationwide to ban “clopenings” — when a worker closes at a business late at night and then must return in the morning the next day to open. A bill banning the practice was scheduled to be introduced in Minnesota on Monday; House Minority Leader Paul Thissen told the Times: “When it comes to scheduling, the playing field is tilted very dramatically in favor of the employer… What we’re proposing is just trying to rebalance the playing ...
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About 1,000 express interest in medical marijuana program 24.2.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and cancer are the most common conditions among patients interested in registering with the state's new medical cannabis program.
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Mother of son who died of overdose calls for more Narcan awareness 23.2.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
There is growing concern that the drug's distribution remains too limited and that not enough people know about it.
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Survey finds MS, epilepsy, cancer top targets for MN medical pot 23.2.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
About half of potential users of medical cannabis reported their qualifying condition as multiple sclerosis or severe muscle spasms, according to an informal Minnesota Health Department survey.
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Schools face dilemma when pot goes recreational 23.2.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.
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When Pot Goes From Illegal To Recreational, Schools Face A Dilemma 23.2.2015 NPR: All Things Considered
Since Colorado legalized marijuana use, some schools in the state are starting to change how they teach students about the drug in health class. Educators worry students are receiving mixed messages.
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