User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-National
Category: Drugs
Last updated: Aug 24 2016 21:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump, in answer to police chiefs, says there is 'no noticeable partnership' between feds and local police 24.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
In response to a question from the International Association of Chiefs of Police about improving the “important” partnership between federal and local law enforcement, Republican presidential candidate Donald J. Trump recently wrote that, “Currently, there is no noticeable partnership between the federal government and state and local law enforcement.” He then added, “That will dramatically change in a Trump administration.” The lack of partnership may come as a surprise to the numerous joint fe...
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Illegal drugs flow into California's death row despite high security - and some condemned prisoners die 24.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Condemned murderer Michael Jones was acting strangely and profusely sweating when guards escorted him in chains to the San Quentin medical unit that doubles as the psych ward on death row.

“Doggone, I don’t think you’re ever going to see me again,” he told a fellow inmate, Clifton Perry.

Hours...

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Weedmaps design flaw reveals dispensary guide is riddled with suspicious reviews 24.8.2016 L.A. Times - Technology News

Millions of consumers treat Weedmaps like the Yelp for pot, relying on the Irvine company as their definitive guide to marijuana dispensaries, varieties and doctors.

But a key feature — user reviews of pot businesses — may be tainted by thousands of potentially fraudulent comments, a flaw in the...

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Community members consider how to address prescription drug and heroin abuse 23.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Community members and human service agencies gathered together last week at a community forum hosted by Grand Futures Prevention Coalition and the Moffat County Department of Social Services to learn more about prescription drug addiction, heroin abuse and what might be done to work on these problems now, before they become community epidemics. “Our main reason for having this discussion is to get a task force up and running now that it’s becoming an issue,” said Karli Bockelman, Moffat County program director for Grand Futures. “We are seeing use in ages 20 to 40. I’d like to see the task force running before it becomes a major problem for our community.” Overdoses from heroin, prescription drugs, and opioid pain relievers last year surpassed car accidents as the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Between 2012 and 2014, Moffat County saw five opiate-related deaths, while Routt and Garfield counties had six each, as ...
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New Mexico extends re-enrollment period for pot patients 21.8.2016 Durango Herald
SANTA FE – New Mexico health officials are extending the enrollment period by up to 60 days for patients who need to renew their certification for the state’s medical marijuana program.The announcement was made Friday with a posting on the Health Department’s website .Officials say state and local law...
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Strapped towns in southeast Colorado struggle to fight heroin’s spread 21.8.2016 Denver Post: Local
While heroin is entrenched in Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo, it’s now leaving its mark in rural corners of the state, like the Lower Arkansas Valley, where law enforcement and social services agencies sometimes lack the resources of their big-city counterparts.
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All Solutions for Medical Cannabis Point to Congress 19.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Today over 300 million Americans live in states with medical cannabis laws, and over 2 million individuals are legally using medical cannabis under these state programs. However, all of these patients and programs are in violation of federal laws. Over the past few years, most federal interference has come to halt (more than $500,000,000 dollars of anti-medical cannabis federal enforcement later ) due to the the passage of the Rohrabacher-Farr medical cannabis amendment to the CJS appropriations bill in 2014 and 2015 which prohibits federal interference with state medical cannabis programs as well as the August 2013 Department of Justice memo that made clear that state legal medical marijuana is not a top priority  for federal enforcement. Over the last week the nation has turned its attention once again to the federal battle between the states and federal government as it relates to medical cannabis, and all solutions require action by Congress. On August 10th the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) ...
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DEA Wins the Battle but Is Losing the War on Marijuana 19.8.2016 American Prospect
AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File Dozens of people line up outside the Silver State Relief medical marijuana dispensary in Sparks, Nevada, to be among the first in Nevada to legally purchase medicinal pot.  The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s refusal to decontrol marijuana has raised the hackles of doctors, patient advocacy groups, cannabis entrepreneurs, and potheads almost everywhere. Under the agency’s recent directive , marijuana remains an illegal, controlled substance like heroin and LSD that has no medical value. But unlike most federal regulations, the DEA move will have little to no effect on state-level marijuana politics.  Since Colorado and Washington state green-lighted recreational marijuana in 2012, the DEA has gotten swamped by a tidal wave of legalization campaigns across the country for recreational and medical marijuana. Most states have moved fast, first, to allow doctors and patients who suffer from diseases like cancer and conditions like chronic pain to be able to use marijuana ...
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Videos Surface of a Death in Custody the LAPD Didn't Want Released 19.8.2016 Truthout.com
Early on the afternoon of June 4, 2012, Vachel Howard was handcuffed to a bench inside the Los Angeles Police Department's 77th Street Station Jail. He was 56 years old, and had been taken into custody for driving while intoxicated. The grandfather of seven had been strip-searched, and his shirt still hung open. Howard told the officers present that he suffered from schizophrenia. Police suspected he was high on cocaine. Less than an hour later, Howard was pronounced dead at Good Samaritan Hospital, just miles from the jail. He had been released from the handcuffs, but later subdued by half a dozen officers after he became, by their testimony, "violent and combative." A coroner eventually listed three contributing causes of death: cocaine intoxication, heart disease, and a chokehold employed by one of the officers. Two years of litigation followed before, in October of 2015, the city of Los Angeles agreed to pay Howard's family $2.85 million to settle a wrongful death claim. The legal fight included ...
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Opioids lead to 3,000% rise in medical services 18.8.2016 CNN: Top Stories
In one of the first looks at privately insured patients with opioid problems, researchers paint a grim picture: Medical services for people with opioid dependence diagnoses skyrocketed more than 3,000 percent between 2007 and 2014.
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27 heroin overdoses in 4 hours 18.8.2016 CNN: Top Stories
There were 27 heroin overdoses within four hours, including one death, in Huntington, West Virginia on Monday. Officials believe the drug may be laced with something making it particularly dangerous.
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WHY IT MATTERS: Opioid epidemic 17.8.2016 AP Top News
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- THE ISSUE: More Americans are dying from opioids than at any time in recent history, with overdose deaths hitting a peak of 28,000 in 2014. That amounts to 78 Americans dying from an opioid overdose every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses opioid as an umbrella term for synthetic painkillers and for drugs derived naturally from opium (known more specifically as opiates), such a heroin....
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WHY IT MATTERS: Opioid epidemic 17.8.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — THE ISSUE: More Americans are dying from opioids than at any time in recent history, with overdose deaths hitting a peak of 28,000 in 2014. That amounts to 78 Americans dying from an opioid overdose every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses opioid as […]
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A beloved mayor. An alleged meth-for-sex scheme. And a secret life exposed. 16.8.2016 Washington Post
Until he was charged with trading drugs for group sex, Scott Silverthorne was the public face of Fairfax City, Va. Before that, though, the mayor’s world was unraveling.
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Prosecution trend: After fatal OD, dealer charged with death 14.8.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

LITTLETON, N.H. (AP) — He knew he was in trouble even before he read the text message: “Did u hear what hapnd 2 ed?” Ed Martin III had been found dead in the bathroom of a convenience store, slumped over on his knees with a needle and a residue-stained spoon in his pocket. He’d mainlined […]
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The Dangers of Dabbing: The Health Risks Posed by the Latest Marijuana Trend 13.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have now legalized marijuana in some form. And the trend continues unabated: this year could see marijuana being legalized for recreational use in an additional 10 states and for medical use in an additional six states. The march toward legalization has brought a dramatic change in attitude. Once perceived as a serious threat to public health and safety - if not a downright evil - marijuana is now considered by most to be safe - on the order of drinking alcohol, but safer. Many even consider it to be good for them. Fifty-four percent of American registered voters support full legalization, and 12.5 percent of American adults use marijuana, including a third of high school seniors . In some ways, this swing in attitude is understandable given that since 1970 marijuana has been lumped in the same category as heroin and cocaine as a schedule I drug. The drugs placed in this category were defined as drugs that had a high potential for abuse, no accredited ...
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The Devastation of the Opioid Epidemic, in One Chart 13.8.2016 Mother Jones
The opioid epidemic in America is taking its toll on a class of victims who have received relatively little attention in the crisis: babies. The rate of babies born in drug withdrawal has quadrupled over a 15-year stretch, according to data released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report looked at the prevalence of babies born between 1999 and 2013 with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), an illness caused by exposure in the womb to addictive drugs, primarily opioids—including heroin, methadone, and prescription painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone (known by brand names OxyContin and Vicodin, respectively). NAS isn't known to have long-lasting effects, but babies going through it can suffer from tremors, seizures, gastrointestinal problems, and fevers. The increasing rates mirror the skyrocketing use of opioids across the country. In 2014, more than 47,000 Americans died from drug overdoses—a similar number to the fatalities during the HIV epidemic at its peak in ...
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Canada to allow medical marijuana patients to grow cannabis 12.8.2016 Washington Post: World
The Canadian government says medical marijuana patients will be able to grow their own cannabis under new regulations that come into effect later this month.
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Now You Can Finally Watch The Infamous Rob Ford Crack Tape 12.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A publication ban on the infamous video of former Toronto mayor Rob Ford smoking crack cocaine was lifted on Thursday , allowing for the first public airing of the footage that sparked a political scandal and media circus in 2013. In the short cell phone video, Ford, who died earlier this year, appears in a disheveled state as he sits with a lighter in one hand and glass pipe in the other. He largely mumbles in agreement as an unseen friend, Elena Basso, talks animatedly about Ford’s achievements and denounces his detractors with some explicit language. At one point, Ford calls current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a “fat dick.” The tape has had a long and bizarre journey to public view. Ford, who died of a rare form of cancer in March, was the mayor of Canada’s largest city when reporters from the Toronto Star newspaper and Gawker wrote, in May 2013, that they had viewed a tape of him using crack. Gawker raised $200,000 to buy the tape from their unnamed source but the deal ultimately fell through. In ...
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Canada to allow medical marijuana patients to grow cannabis 12.8.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

TORONTO (AP) — The Canadian government says medical marijuana patients will be able to grow their own cannabis under new regulations that come into effect later this month. Health Canada announced Thursday that patients approved for medical marijuana can register with Health Canada to grow a limited amount of cannabis for their own medical purposes. […]
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