User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Regional
Category: Toxics
Last updated: May 05 2016 08:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,127    
Household waste collections start Thursday 5.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Salt Lake County Health Department will collect electronics, pharmaceutical and household hazardous wastes from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Thursday at Sugar House Park in Salt Lake City. Electronics include computer equipment, cell phones, televisions and stereo equipment, said health department spokeswoman Pamela Davenport. The household hazardous waste category is broad, she added, involving “anything poisonous, flammable, corrosive or toxic.” That includes hard-care chemicals, pesticides, fuels, p... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
NFL: Critics of $1 billion NFL concussion deal seek court review 29.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Philadelphia • Critics of the proposed $1 billion settlement of NFL concussion claims want a full U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia to review a recent court decision that upheld the deal. The challengers believe the lead players’ lawyers negotiated away compensation for the key complaint in the original lawsuit, a brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, because the science is still being developed. In their appeal Thursday, they said the lead players’ lawyers traded away the CT... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Utah's anti-porn resolution leads to spat among Republican candidates for governor 21.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah declaring pornography a public health crisis elicited a response from Larry Flynt, the founder of Hustler Magazine. And Flynt’s response resulted in a Twitter fight between the Republicans running for governor. Shortly after Gov. Gary Herbert headlined a celebratory and ceremonial signing of the anti-porn resolution at the state Capitol on Tuesday, Flynt released a statement saying that Utah’s Legislature “is obviously confused about what constitutes a public health crisis, so I’ll send the... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
College student wins award for charge against air pollution 18.4.2016 Durango Herald
(c) 2016, The Washington Post. --- This story is embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Monday, April 18. ---
Also found in: [+]
Lead level in water at Arvada pre-school far exceeds federal limit 16.4.2016 Denver Post: Local
ARVADA — Water tested from a faucet at a Head Start facility in Arvada showed lead levels 12 times higher than the federal government's "action level" for the toxic ...
Also found in: [+]
Elevated lead levels in water shuts down Arvada Head Start building 15.4.2016 Denver Post: Local
A Head Start building in Arvada was closed down this week after elevated levels of lead were found in the water, authorities said ...
Also found in: [+]
CU study: insurance for single embryo in vitro fertilization preferred 14.4.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Expanding insurance coverage to cover a type of in vitro fertilization known as elective single-embryo transfer could lead to improved health outcomes and lower health care costs, according to
Also found in: [+]
Health workers get lead-test help from Flint student nurses 12.4.2016 Denver Post: National News Headlines
FLINT, Mich. (AP) — A nurse volunteering at the free lead-testing clinic at a Flint school sensed immediately that the boy was nervous about being poked in the finger.
Also found in: [+]
Letter: Vaccines work, and your children are counting on you 11.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A great benefit of modern medicine includes vaccines, a targeted topic within society at present. The claims made against vaccines may include that the immunizations don’t allow the individual to gain a natural and stronger immunity to some diseases and vaccines contain harmful ingredients such as mercury which will cause autism in children. With a greater perspective and some research, one will find, natural immunity may not take precedence over artificial immunity because some diseases have en... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Health care, energy firms lead U.S. stocks up 7.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
New York • The stock market turned in a solid gain Wednesday, led by a jump in health care and energy companies. Drugmakers posted especially big increases, including a 6 percent rise in biotechnology company Celgene. Energy stocks rose as the price of oil shot 5 percent higher. Chevron increased 2 percent. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 112 points, or 0.6 percent, to 17,716. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 21 points, or 1.1 percent, to 2,066. The Nasdaq composite added 76 point... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Health care, energy sectors lead stocks higher 6.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
New York • Stocks are making a cautious recovery Wednesday morning as health care companies trade higher. Energy companies are also rising along with the price of oil. Indexes have slumped over the last two days and the market is coming off its worst day in about a month. KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average gained 18 points, or 0.1 percent, to 17,620 as of 8:55 a.m. Mountain time. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose seven points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,051. The Nasdaq composite index ...
Also found in: [+]
Report says Bangladesh gov't wells not fixing arsenic crisis 6.4.2016 Denver Post: National News Headlines
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Arsenic-tainted government wells are still poisoning an estimated 20 million people in Bangladesh, a number that is unchanged from 10 years ago despite years of action to dig new wells at safer depths, according to a report released Wednesday.
Also found in: [+]
Book review: Young couple navigates cancer and life in 'Alice & Oliver' 6.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Set in early ’90s Manhattan when street corners touted pay phones, Charles Bock’s “Alice and Oliver” jarringly drops readers into cancer’s attack on a young family. It begins with a sudden bout of nausea on the sidewalk and a subsequent diagnosis. Abruptly, a blue wig replaces Alice’s natural hair and formula must substitute the breast milk now toxic to her and Oliver’s daughter. While Alice fights to stay alive, Oliver battles insurance policies and his own demons. Time stretches on in meticulo...
Also found in: [+]
Embattled Denver Health chief Gonzalez announces June retirement 31.3.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
The chief executive of Denver Health Medical Center, whose tenure has been marked in recent months by turmoil and departures of top doctors, announced his retirement Wednesday.
Also found in: [+]
Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association: Programs help youth experiencing loss 27.3.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Loss can take different forms, each carrying with it a heavy bundle of difficult emotions. It can be hard to express these emotions in a healthy way that helps a person grieve but does not consume his or her life, responsibilities and goals. This can be especially true for children and youth. That’s where art comes in. The Youth Resiliency program at the Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association uses creative expression — drawing, painting, writing, storytelling, poetry and music — to help preschool through college-age students process many different types of loss, including death and divorce, as well as loss related to family abuse, addiction and mental health issues. “If you don’t feel like you can talk about it, you’ve got to find a way to get emotions out,” said Katy Thiel, who leads the program in Routt County schools. “Art is a great way for them to express themselves and also a great way for us to teach them coping skills.” Thiel is a master’s level social worker. Sandy Beran, a licensed ...
Also found in: [+]
Michigan's lament: As Congress bickers, Flint suffers 26.3.2016 Denver Post: National News Headlines
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's been two years since problems began with the drinking water in Flint, Michigan, and nearly six months since officials declared a public health emergency there.
Flam: Don't live in Flint? Lead exposure is your problem, too 26.2.2016 Denver Post: Opinion
The crisis in Flint, Mich., has focused attention on lead-tainted water flowing through taps in the U.S. as well as lead paint exposures that continue to plague cities such as Baltimore and Philadelphia.
Also found in: [+]
Greeley man's death tank gauging at oil rig leads to $14,800 in fines 13.2.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Two oil field companies were fined a total of $14,800 for their role in fatally exposing a 57-year-old Greeley man to toxic vapors while he worked in the Weld County oil patch in ...
Also found in: [+]
Flint counsel says manslaughter charge harshest possible 9.2.2016 Durango Herald
A special counsel appointed to investigate Flint's water crisis says the harshest criminal charge could include involuntary manslaughter
Also found in: [+]
Water crisis spurs calls to change Michigan open-records law 30.1.2016 Denver Post: National News Headlines
LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Under fire for his administration's role in Flint's lead-tainted water emergency, Michigan Gov.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,127