User: flenvcenter Topic: Environmental Health-Regional
Category: Toxics
Last updated: Jun 21 2016 08:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,140    
Second 101010 challenges 10 CEOs on chronic pain, toxic stress and 8 other health problems 21.6.2016 Denver Post: Business
Denver's own digital-health business generator 10.10.10 launched year two on Monday, laying out a second set of 10 critical health issues that would benefit from an entrepreneur's touch.
Also found in: [+]
The EPA has deemed the drinking water toxic in these three Colorado towns 16.6.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Invisible toxic chemicals are contaminating drinking water for 80,000 people south of Colorado Springs, one of 63 areas nationwide where the chemicals widely used to fight petroleum fires have been measured at levels the EPA deems dangerous.
Also found in: [+]
Mike Kopp to lead Colorado Concern 10.6.2016 Denver Post: Local
Former state lawmaker Mike Kopp has been named president and chief executive of Colorado Concern, a powerhouse group of more than 100 of the state's business executives.
Also found in: [+]
Robert B. Stevenson: Why is pot the whipping boy? 9.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
I have been jarred enough times today, and to a sufficient degree each time, that I write regarding the June 8 Steamboat Today article, “Doctors back pot tax — Levy would generate funds for substance abuse prevention, treatment.” I have nothing against using tax money to address what Yampa Valley Medical Center CEO Frank May described as “the intersection of untreated mental health conditions and abuse of both legal and illegal substances...”  A tax locally-dedicated to that purpose sounds OK to me, because most governments have greatly curtailed expenditures on mental health. But, really, why is pot the whipping boy? Again. The article referred to nine Northwest Colorado overdose deaths this year. I think we can be sure none of those was from pot. And I think we can be pretty sure that when it comes to being a source of mischief, misery, disorientation and death in Northwest Colorado, alcohol has a huge lead over pot. I bet prescription drugs and opioids have a big lead also.  I would not be surprised ...
Also found in: [+]
Investigator: FDA still taking months to recall tainted food 9.6.2016 Denver Post: Local
Food safety has long been a weakness for the FDA, an agency thinly stretched to oversee about 80 percent of the nation’s food supply, including seafood, dairy, fruits and vegetables.
Also found in: [+]
Congress backs putting chemicals under fed scrutiny 8.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Toxic chemicals used in everyday products such as household cleaners, clothing and furniture have been linked to serious illnesses, including cancer, infertility, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Under current law, only a small fraction of chemicals used in these products have been reviewed for safety. A bill that Congress sent President Barack Obama on Tuesday would set new safety standards for asbestos and other dangerous chemicals, including formaldehyde, styrene and BPA, that have gone unre... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Letter: Our grandchildren could be paying for prison liabilities 6.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Did anyone else notice that the same day it was announced in The Tribune that the new prison site could be plagued by toxic dust, there was also an article regarding Arizona Sheriff Joe Apaio’s illegal actions, which have resulted in payouts to his victims? The court-ordered settlement amount could reach millions of dollars, and Maricopa County taxpayers will have to foot that bill. If the prison is built on the currently approved site, prisoners and prison personnel face the potential for a ple... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet: Working to combat Zika virus 4.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Recently, the Zika virus has been elevated to a pandemic by the National Institute of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control has called the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. The virus, which often causes no symptoms or mild symptoms in most adults, can lead to serious conditions, including paralysis caused by Guillain-Barré syndrome. Of greater concern to many families is the link to birth defects in newborns. Pregnant women who contract Zika may have children born with microcephaly, a birth defect in which a baby’s head is smaller than expected. This condition can lead to developmental disorders. The outbreak has spread from the Asian Pacific to South and Central America and Mexico. The CDC estimates there have been more than 500 travel-related cases of Zika in the U.S., 48 of which were pregnant women. Compare that to the 2014 Ebola scare, when only four Americans contracted the disease due to travel abroad. As the virus continues to spread, it has become more apparent ...
Also found in: [+]
Op-ed: Abortion bans lead to disability and death 1.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
“It is best to only have enough children that you can give your best to.” This obviously simple, yet often unattainable ideal was shared with me when I was participating in a global health learning abroad trip as a first year medical student. This young Ghanaian woman from a small rural village in West Africa, who I will call Ophelia, shared her story with me on a hot July afternoon. Her story, like many women in Ghana, is terrible, desperate and unnecessary. Our project’s purpose in Ghana was t...
Also found in: [+]
Revamped chemical safety law gives EPA more power 26.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The bipartisan measure represents the most sweeping environmental law to pass Congress in decades.
Also found in: [+]
Colorado scientists: global warming taking human toll 20.5.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Global warming may be taking a toll on human lives, such as low-income farmers in hot, rural tropical regions, Colorado-based scientists have found.
Also found in: [+]
Congress OKs overhaul of chemical regulations 20.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • A bipartisan agreement reached by House and Senate negotiators would set new safety standards for asbestos and other dangerous chemicals, including tens of thousands that have gone unregulated for decades. A bill to be voted on as soon as next week would offer new protections for pregnant women, children, workers and others vulnerable to the effects of chemicals such as formaldehyde and styrene used in homes and businesses every day. If enacted into law, the bill would be the first ...
Also found in: [+]
Why doesn’t the West report its lead data? 12.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Lead poisoning in children is underreported nationwide, and the West’s lack of data is particularly glaring.
Also found in: [+]
Household waste collections start Thursday 5.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Salt Lake County Health Department will collect electronics, pharmaceutical and household hazardous wastes from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Thursday at Sugar House Park in Salt Lake City. Electronics include computer equipment, cell phones, televisions and stereo equipment, said health department spokeswoman Pamela Davenport. The household hazardous waste category is broad, she added, involving “anything poisonous, flammable, corrosive or toxic.” That includes hard-care chemicals, pesticides, fuels, p... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
NFL: Critics of $1 billion NFL concussion deal seek court review 29.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Philadelphia • Critics of the proposed $1 billion settlement of NFL concussion claims want a full U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia to review a recent court decision that upheld the deal. The challengers believe the lead players’ lawyers negotiated away compensation for the key complaint in the original lawsuit, a brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, because the science is still being developed. In their appeal Thursday, they said the lead players’ lawyers traded away the CT... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Utah's anti-porn resolution leads to spat among Republican candidates for governor 21.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah declaring pornography a public health crisis elicited a response from Larry Flynt, the founder of Hustler Magazine. And Flynt’s response resulted in a Twitter fight between the Republicans running for governor. Shortly after Gov. Gary Herbert headlined a celebratory and ceremonial signing of the anti-porn resolution at the state Capitol on Tuesday, Flynt released a statement saying that Utah’s Legislature “is obviously confused about what constitutes a public health crisis, so I’ll send the... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
College student wins award for charge against air pollution 18.4.2016 Durango Herald
(c) 2016, The Washington Post. --- This story is embargoed until 12:01 a.m. EST Monday, April 18. ---
Also found in: [+]
Lead level in water at Arvada pre-school far exceeds federal limit 16.4.2016 Denver Post: Local
ARVADA — Water tested from a faucet at a Head Start facility in Arvada showed lead levels 12 times higher than the federal government's "action level" for the toxic ...
Also found in: [+]
Elevated lead levels in water shuts down Arvada Head Start building 15.4.2016 Denver Post: Local
A Head Start building in Arvada was closed down this week after elevated levels of lead were found in the water, authorities said ...
Also found in: [+]
CU study: insurance for single embryo in vitro fertilization preferred 14.4.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Expanding insurance coverage to cover a type of in vitro fertilization known as elective single-embryo transfer could lead to improved health outcomes and lower health care costs, according to
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,140