User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Security :: Hunger
Last updated: Aug 25 2016 05:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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With a world in peril, where do our charitable donations have the most clout? 25.8.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. For those of you who already think the world is going to hell in a handbasket these days, I have lamentable news: You don't know the half of it. As Danny Glenwright, dynamic executive director of Action Against Hunger Canada (ACF, for the French name), informed his supporters the other ...
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US Soldiers Are Relying on Millions of Dollars in Food Stamps to Survive 17.8.2016 Truthout.com
In just one year, active duty service members had to rely on $24 million worth of food stamps. But the Department of Defense has so far not made a concerted effort to work with the USDA to understand the scope of the problem. Soldiers march near a plane at Eielson Air Force Base in Fairbanks, Alaska, on February 14, 2008. (Photo: Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper Installation Management Command, US Army ) Military service members on active duty spent $24 million in food stamps at military commissary shops from September 2014 to August 2015, and 45 percent of students in schools run by the military are eligible for free or reduced-price meal programs. For years, the military has been embarrassed by reports showing that some active-duty service members struggle to feed their families and use government benefits to get by. A recent report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that the Department of Defense (DoD) does not fully understand the scope of the problem. The USDA runs the Supplemental ...
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Three Colombian women tell us why preserving seeds is an act of resistance 16.8.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, August 16, 2016 Colombian women are fighting to protect native seeds. Why? We spoke with three seed guardians about the importance of this work. Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Protection of native seeds is growing strong in Colombia. Colombian women are preserving seeds from multiple threats such as mining, free trade agreements, agrochemicals, hybrid and transgenic seeds among others. Fernanda Sánchez Jaramillo spoke with three women from three different provinces in Colombia about how being a seed guardian is an act of resistance, promotes food security and maintains cultural ...
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How Venezuela's Repressive Government Controls the Nation Through Hunger 11.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The Venezuelan government has become one of the world's cruelest teasers. It has created unspeakable hardships for the populace and, at the same time, is taking advantage of those hardships to introduce new forms of political control. The proliferation of food lines is a perfect example of this teasing. Lines to buy groceries have become longer and more widespread. In a country with plenty of irritants, these food lines, hardly seen before 2010, have become Venezuela's most aggravating political problem today. You would think that food lines would prompt riots. And some rioting is occurring . But we are not seeing anything like a Venezuelan Spring in which protests envelop the country and lead to governmental change. Why? Because food lines have paradoxically given the government new mechanisms for keeping protests at bay. Maduro has Sovietized Venezuela. Venezuela is facing a manmade food crisis. In the mid-2000s, under President Hugo Chávez, the state implemented a series of ill-conceived economic ...
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More States Are Allowing Drug Felons To Access Welfare Programs 9.8.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily reporting and analysis on trends in state policy. ATLANTA — Twenty years after a federal law blocked people with felony drug convictions from receiving welfare or food stamps, more states are loosening those restrictions — or waiving them entirely. In April, Gov. Nathan Deal, a Republican, signed a criminal justice reform bill that lifted the ban on food stamps for drug felons in Georgia. Alaska followed suit in July, although applicants must prove they are complying with parole and are in treatment for substance abuse. And in Delaware, a bill to lift cash assistance restrictions for drug felons passed out of committee in June. The legislative session ended before the bill could be put to a vote. The changes come amid broader efforts in Washington and many states to reform drug policies and criminal justice approaches. And they reflect a growing consensus that ...
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Putting Food Waste To Work 8.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Food for the Hungry (FH) has been working for over 40 years in some of the world's harshest places, and we've seen a positive link between the responsible use and protection of the environment and the chances of a family breaking out of poverty. It's a simple truth: when we care for creation, we care for people. One of the creative ways we've been working to use earth's resources to help solve hunger and poverty for families, capitalizes on something we all have far too much of -waste. We've developed a project called keyhole gardens which puts waste to work. It's a common story around the world, a woman is widowed and left alone with children to feed. "It has been very difficult to face life without my husband," said Dona Rutilia, one of these widowed mothers, told our staff in Guatemala. With no knowledge of sustainable agriculture, she couldn't adequately feed her two young children. FH taught her how to grow a keyhole garden, a small, elevated kitchen garden that looks like a keyhole. This small plot ...
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There’s a Hunger Problem in Every County in America—and It’s Solvable 3.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Diana Aviv

Loudoun County is a suburban area with colonial roots, nestled about 45 miles northwest of the District of Columbia. It boasts the nation’s highest median household income at nearly $124,000 per year.  It also has 14,000 residents who struggle with food insecurity, or a lack of reliable access to affordable and nutritious food.

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Dangerous Liaisons: ChemChina's Bid for Syngenta 29.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Protesters in Munich, Germany, demonstrate against "patents on life" by companies such as Syngenta and Monsanto, January 20, 2016. (Photo: Michaela Handrek-Rehle / Campact ) We all love to hate Monsanto. We also know that Monsanto isn't the only poison-maker trying to pass itself off as a "farmer-friendly producer of food to feed the world." Monsanto belongs to an exclusive club of dominant pesticide makers. That club, which includes Dow, Dupont, Bayer, Syngenta and BASF, is about to get a lot smaller. And a lot more dangerous. Bayer has been trying for months  to buy  Monsanto. Dow and Dupont are in talks  to merge . And Switzerland-based Syngenta may soon  be owned  by ChemChina. It's bad enough that  less than a dozen multinational corporations  (including Monsanto, Dupont, Bayer and Syngenta) control nearly 70 percent of the global seed market. If these mergers and buyouts go through, that number will shrink even further. The recent merger and acquisition in the seed and chemical (why are the words ...
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Indigenous Villages in Honduras Overcome Hunger at Schools 20.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Students at the "República de Venezuela" School in the indigenous Lenca village of Coloaca in western Honduras, where they have a vegetable garden to grow produce and at the same time learn about the importance of a healthy and nutritious diet. (Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS) Barely 11-years-old and in the sixth grade of primary school, this student dreams of becoming a farmer in order to produce food so that the children in his community never have to go hungry. Josué Orlando Torres of the indigenous Lenca people lives in a remote corner of the west of Honduras. He is part of a success story in this village of Coalaca, population 750, in the municipality of Las Flores in the department (province) of Lempira. Five years ago a Sustainable School Feeding Programme (PAES) was launched in this area. It has improved local children's nutritional status and enjoys plenty of local, governmental and international participation. Torres is proud of his school, named for the Republic of Venezuela, where 107 students are ...
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2016 World Food Prize: More Genewashing? 5.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Yet again, the World Food Prize has lent its global pulpit to the biotech brigade. On Tuesday, June 28, Drs. Maria Andrade, Robert Mwanga, Jan Low, and Howarth Bouis were crowned the 2016 World Food Prize Laureates during a ceremony at the U.S. State Department. Titled "Biofortification Pioneers", their combined efforts have been heralded as potentially impacting over 10 million rural poor across Africa, Asia and Latin America through biofortification, the process of scientifically breeding vitamins and nutrients into staple crops. The significance of two African World Food Prize Laureates cannot be understated. They are, as the website states, "working on solutions to tackle malnutrition in Africa, for Africa". But financial sponsors of the technology have largely come from outside of Africa -- the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the World Bank, the United States Department of Agriculture, the United Kingdom Department of International Development, the International Fertilizer Group and large ...
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Mass Fish Deaths in Vietnam Highlight the Country's Press Freedom Problem 3.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
MELBOURNE, Australia -- The stink from Vietnam's fish kill scandal -- which left some 70 tons of dead fish scattered across the beaches of four of the country's provinces and fishermen out of work -- is symptomatic of something greater than worries about food security and the environment: access to information and the ability to distribute it. On June 30, almost three months since the mass fish deaths began, Vietnam's newspapers all began printing the same story : Formosa Ha Tinh Steel Corp., a subsidiary of Taiwan's Formosa Plastics Group, blamed by many for the incident, had accepted responsibility for the industrial pollution that had caused the environmental fiasco and would pay $500 million in compensation. The government of Vietnam, which had been silent for much of this, also noted the company was responsible due to a toxic spill. Earlier in the month there was progress towards a verdict but no confirmation, as Tuoi Tre newspaper wrote: On June 2, the government held a press meeting to announce ...
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1 In 6 U.S. Households Didn't Have Enough Money For Food Last Year: Report 2.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
One in six households struggled to buy food last year, according to a new report. While the figures are “unacceptable,” they mark the sharpest decline since such data has been made available. More than 170,000 households were surveyed last year and asked if they had trouble at any point gathering funds to buy food. Of those surveyed, 16 percent said they couldn’t afford food at times, according to data collected by Gallup and released by the Food Research & Action Center section as part of its new report, “How Hungry Is America?”  That was a significant drop from 2013, when 18.9 percent of respondents said they couldn’t afford food. Gallup began collecting the food insecurity data in 2008 during the height of the Great Recession. The statistics have improved thanks to declines in unemployment, increases in the share of eligible families receiving SNAP benefits (formerly known as food stamps) and insurance affordability under the Affordable Care Act, among other considerations. While the improvements are ...
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Are Venezuela's food shortages a sign that food security is still a risk? 1.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From technological advancements in food production to our increasingly interconnected globe, many factors have reduced the risk of wide-scale famines. However, the current food shortages in Venezuela, which have plunged the nation into chaos, highlight that the threat of world hunger is not over for good. To discuss the future of food security, we talked to Stephen Devereux , a development economist from the University of Sussex. ResearchGate: In this article , researcher Dr. de Waal argues that the time of famines may be over. What's your view on this? Stephen Devereux: I think Alex de Waal is probably right that the time of catastrophic famines is over, meaning those famines that used to kill hundreds of thousands or even millions of people. But that doesn't mean that we won't have more minor and moderate scale famines in the future. It is important to remember that we have had quite a few famines since the last 'great famine' in Ethiopia in 1984 that Alex mentions in his article. Already in the 21st ...
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Don't Believe This Facebook Food Stamp Rumor 30.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- A rumor that President Barack Obama will give a thousand bucks to everyone on food stamps has circulated so widely that one state government posted an official statement denying it. "This rumor is 100% false," the Louisiana Department of Children & Family Services said on its website this week.  The rumor, different versions of which circulated on Facebook, claimed Obama would give $1,000 in nutrition assistance benefits if they called a number on the back of the debit cards used to distribute benefits. The story  earned a debunking from Snopes.com , a website that dispels urban legends, email chain letters and fake news stories. Snopes writer Kim LaCapria said the site was inundated with emails last week asking if the rumor was true.  LaCapria said this particular rumor is unusual in that it seemed to have spread organically on Facebook without having been initially made up by a fake news website. Snopes has previously debunked fake news stories claiming that everyone on welfare will get a ...
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USDA Says Paul LePage's Food Stamp Freakout Will Harm Children 23.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R) is putting vulnerable people in his state at risk with his food stamp crusade, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Wednesday.  In a recent letter to the Obama administration, LePage said that if the federal government won't let him stop Mainers from using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program debit cards to buy candy and soda, then the state will wash its hands of the SNAP program altogether and let the federal government deal with it.  USDA spokesman Matt Herrick says the agency can't just step in and do the state's job of distributing the federal benefit to low-income individuals and families.  "We don't have the authority or the funding to administer SNAP at the state level," Herrick told The Huffington Post.  In other words, if the state government won't provide nutrition assistance in Maine, no one will. Such a situation would be unprecedented.  "So what this means in real terms, for real-world people, is that children suffer, they ...
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Climate change may soon diminish crop yields 22.6.2016 TreeHugger
Rising temperatures are posing a threat to global food security.
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Paul LePage Threatens To Drop Food Stamps Because Of His Soda Freakout 22.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R) wants to wash his hands of the federal food stamp program because beneficiaries eat so much filthy junk food.  LePage told the Obama administration that he'd end the state's administration of food stamps if the U.S. Department of Agriculture won't let him decide which foods Mainers can buy with their benefits.  “It’s time for the federal government to wake up and smell the energy drinks,” LePage wrote in a letter to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “Doubtful that it will, I will be pursuing options to implement reform unilaterally or cease Maine’s administration of the food stamp program altogether," LePage wrote.  States distribute the benefits but the federal government sets the rules for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which serves roughly 44 million Americans nationwide, including nearly 200,000 in Maine.  LePage spokeswoman Adrienne Bennett told The Huffington Post in an email that LePage doesn't want to end SNAP benefits in Maine, just that he wants to ...
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Women lead the fight against corporate agriculture around the world 16.6.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
June 16, 2016 Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Around the world, women are pushing back against GMOs and corporate agriculture and building a food system that promotes health and justice for ...
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Pathways of Transition to Agroecological Food Systems 16.6.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Adam Parsons

An alternative vision of farming and food systems has long been upheld by civil society groups and small-scale producers around the world, based on the science of agroecology and the broader framework of food sovereignty. But while many reports and studies have shown how less intensive, diversified and sustainable farming methods can have far better outcomes than today’s corporate-dominated model of industrial agriculture, the question remains as to how we can make the shift towards agroecological systems on a global scale.

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Feeding A Hungry Urban World 15.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Doug Bereuter It's time to update what we know about global food security. Those familiar with the dialogue will know that the year 2050 marks an important threshold. By then, the planet will have swollen to nine billion people, and we'll have to dramatically increase food production in order to feed them. Some numbers that may be less familiar are these: by that same year, Africa's population will be 56% urban, up from 40% now. In Asia, we'll see a similar rise from 48% today to 64%. Here's another, perhaps more shocking figure: One trillion dollars. That's the estimated value by 2030 for the African agriculture and food sector. For a continent that is often not associated with prosperity, American agricultural producers and businesses will find significant opportunities due to rising demand for U.S. products, know-how, and services. These things are linked. By 2050, an additional 2.5 billion people will live in urban areas. With larger urban populations comes changing food demand: higher ...
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