User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-Independent
Category: Food Security :: Hunger
Last updated: Nov 28 2016 23:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Finance for Farmers Is Key to Averting 1 Billion Hungry 28.11.2016 Truthout.com
The arid region of Settat, 200 kms northeast of Marrakech, Morocco. (Photo: Fabiola Ortiz / IPS) Marrakech -- With climate change posing growing threats to smallholder farmers, experts working around the issues of agriculture and food security say it is more critical than ever to implement locally appropriate solutions to help them adapt to changing rainfall patterns. Most countries consider agriculture a priority when it comes to their plans to limit the rise of global temperatures to less than 2 degrees C. In line with the Paris Climate Change Agreement, 95 percent of all countries included agriculture in their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs). "The climate is changing. We don't have rains that we used to have in the past. In the last decade, we had two consecutive years of intense drought and we lost all the production. The animals all died because they had no water," Ahmed Khiat, 68, a small farmer in the Moroccan community of Souaka, told IPS. Khiat comes from a long line of ...
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How Solar power is bringing food security to Africa 25.11.2016 Environmental News Network
Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. Ninety per cent of Malawians live in rural areas; agriculture makes up 80 per cent of the labour force and 80 per cent of its exports. With so many people reliant on growing things from the ground, disruptions to the climate threatens the wellbeing of an entire nation.For centuries Malawian farmers have learned the patterns of the seasons - when to plant their seeds in order to capture the rains that watered the ground and brought forth food to eat and sell. But this life-saving knowledge is becoming worthless, as rainfall patterns are distorted by a changing climate and the El Nino weather event, which this year created the worst food crisis in 25 years.
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These 8 Statistics Put America’s Childhood Hunger Problem Into Perspective 23.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The hunger epidemic ― and specifically childhood hunger ― is a global issue, and the United States is by no means immune. Many may be surprised to learn just how widespread childhood hunger is among the youngest and most vulnerable Americans, as it impacts millions of children in the U.S. Lack of access to food in general, but also nutritionally-rich foods, can carry long-term impacts: Children who experience hunger as they grow up are at risk of impaired brain development and motor skills, and often struggle in school. In order to shed light on childhood hunger in the U.S., we’ve partnered with Unilever to show just how close to home this issue is. 1 In 6 Children The number of children in the United States who don’t know when their next meal will be. 42.2 Million The number of Americans who lived in food-insecure homes in 2015. As defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture , these households face “the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally sufficient and safe foods, or the uncertain ...
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Here's What People Buy With Food Stamps 22.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― Though people like to complain about food stamp recipients using their benefits for unhealthy things like soda and extravagances like crab legs , new data show they buy basically the same food as everyone else. Households participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and households that didn’t get benefits both bought a lot of junk food, according to a new study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the program. About 40 cents of every dollar went to basics like bread, milk, meat, eggs, fruits and vegetables for both types of households. And 20 cents of every dollar went to sodas and salty snacks. As a percentage of their spending, soft drinks were the top individual commodity among food stamp households, and they came in second place among non-SNAP households.  Kevin Concannon, the USDA’s undersecretary for nutrition, said the data shows food stamp recipients’ purchasing patterns are more similar to than different from everyone else’s.   “It’s ...
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Paris Climate Agreement Enters Into Force: What Does This Mean For Food And Agriculture? 10.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Paris Climate Agreement entered into force last week, heralding a major milestone in international action on climate change, and an ambitious target to contain global temperature rise to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, in this century. Over 100 countries, which account for nearly 70% of global emissions, have ratified the Agreement, and are now obliged to deliver on their commitments and convert their plans into action. But unless countries act decisively and meaningfully, and increase their ambitions over time, this will not be enough to safeguard food and farming. Figure 1. Gap between the current collective ambition of national climate plans (known as NDCs) and the global 2°C goal. Source: Adapted from Rogelj et al. 2016 in Vermeulen 2016 . Future food security in a changing climate The Paris Agreement is made up of Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), which are climate action plans developed by countries, outlining their priorities and measures. The INDCs of countries ...
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Why Are Taxpayers Being Asked to Pay to Promote a Failed GMO Technology? 7.11.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Katherine Paul

Last weekend (Oct. 29), the New York Times ran a piece on how the biotech industry has failed to deliver on its promises for GMO crops. The article followed less than a month after the biotech industry asked congressional leaders for $3 million in taxpayer-provided funding to “educate” the public about biotechnology and agricultural production.

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Why Hillary? Because She is a Leader Against World Hunger 5.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Hillary Clinton is the most qualified candidate running for President. One of the reasons why is her experience with a critical issue that impacts every nation: hunger and malnutrition. As Secretary of State Clinton showed leadership in fighting hunger, which is a major foreign policy objective of the United States. She helped start the Feed the Future initiative, which supports small farmers globally. As Clinton said , "We know very well that hunger is a drain on economic development. It is a threat to the stability of governments and it certainly it deprives us of the talents and energy of nearly a billion people worldwide." The International Food Policy Research Institute said Clinton, as Secretary, showed an "unwavering commitment to raising the profile of hunger and poverty in the developing world as well as in the United States." Hillary Clinton has demonstrated great leadership in fighting hunger, and can further this effort as the next president. (photo courtesy of hillaryclinton.com) The World ...
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Rescuing Food To Fight Hunger 2.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, millions of Americans are food insecure. According to the most recent data from 2015, nearly 13 percent of American households struggle to put food on the table regularly for their families. While too many Americans continue to go hungry, food is being wasted at unacceptably high levels. Whether left to expire in our homes or sitting unsold in our neighborhood grocery stores, 40 percent of the food that is grown or produced in the United States is discarded. Both at businesses and in our homes, Americans have grown accustomed to throwing away food because they've purchased too much, stored it improperly or simply don't find it aesthetically appealing. Combatting food waste is critical in our fight to end hunger. By redirecting excess food to food pantries, soup kitchens and shelters, we can provide nutritious food to the millions of individuals struggling with hunger. There is also the environmental component to consider. In a report , The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United ...
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Hunger Free Manitoba calls on government to raise food allowance 2.11.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
If you only had $3.96 a day to spend on groceries, what would you buy? That's a question Laura Shields deals with every day. Laura is a 61-year-old woman who grew up in Winnipeg's North end. From the age of 17 she worked in a number of factories on an assembly line. Later, she worked for the post office. Because of a slipped disc and twisted pelvis, Laura is unable to work. Her husband, Lyle, used to work selling the Winnipeg Free Press but the paper stand at Hargrave and Portage closed down. With a Grade 6 education, Lyle has been unable to find a stable job. Their stories have been used with ...
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The Ethanol Effect 27.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Not all Americans know what that E-10 sticker on the gas pump means. A new documentary "The Ethanol Effect" which can be seen on PBS or online is a welcome addition to the sometimes technical news coverage of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Passed in 2005 and expanded in 2007, the RFS mandate for biofuel consumption has driven a massive shift in our agriculture system to produce energy. This has harmed our food, water, biodiversity, grasslands, and forests - and not just in the United States. Host David Biello speaks to many stakeholders who are on different sides of this issue. But I do wish they had investigated some of the claims a little more. For example, one speaker claimed that corn ethanol provides better air quality which is simply not true . The testimony of the Nebraska farmers was particularly compelling, because while I do oppose the corn ethanol mandate and advocate for reforming the RFS, I don't blame U.S. farmers for growing corn ethanol. The government set the farm and energy policies ...
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After 3 Years Of Drought, A Starving Madagascar Teeters On The Brink Of 'Catastrophe' 24.10.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Even in good years, hunger is rife in Madagascar. More than 90 percent of its population lives below the poverty line, and nearly half of the country’s children are chronically malnourished or stunted. But three consecutive years of severe drought, widespread crop failure and water shortages have driven Madagascar to the brink of utter “ catastrophe ,” United Nations agencies said last week.  More than half of the population in southern Madagascar, or around 850,000 people, are now experiencing “alarming” levels of hunger , according to the agencies. At least 20 percent of households in the region are on the verge of famine. “These are people living on the very brink,” Chris Nikoi, regional director of the U.N.’s World Food Programme, said Thursday in a statement. “Many have nothing but wild fruits to eat. We must act together now to save lives.” I met women who told me they had nothing to feed their babies except the fruit of the red cactus growing by the roadside. Ertharin Cousin, executive director of ...
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A Sustainable Food System Could Be A Trillion-Dollar Global Windfall 21.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Our planet has a very long way to go toward building a food system that is truly and genuinely sustainable, but that work, if done correctly, could come with a massive reward. That’s the conclusion of a new report released this month by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission, an international nonprofit hoping to make a strong bottom-line case for industries to take a more earth-friendly approach to their businesses. In its flagship report, the commission appears to have done just that. The report claims that taking a sustainable approach to the world’s food and agriculture challenges, like hunger, food waste and environmental degradation, could lead to new business opportunities totaling an annual $2.3 trillion — and 80 million new jobs — by 2030, based on an analysis of of industry reports and academic literature. That economic impact would be a sevenfold return on an annual investment of $320 billion, according to the report. What exactly is meant by a sustainable approach that could ...
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Food for Thought: What does World Food Day Look Like in 2030? 19.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If you're reading this, it's likely you've heard about the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs. In 2015, nearly 200 world leaders committed to work toward 17 SDGs in a collective effort to end extreme poverty and achieve sustainable growth. In particular, Goal 2 has the laudable benchmark of ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture by 2030. You might also know that October 16th was World Food Day , dedicated to raising awareness of world hunger. Now that the day has passed, you may have questions about how you can make a difference going forward in your daily life. You may wonder what Sustainable Development Goal #2 and World Food Day have to do with you. What can YOU actually do to make sure that there is enough food for people who you don't know, living halfway around the world? It seems to be a little bit out of your ability to influence, doesn't it? The fact is, it isn't a government or a coalition of nations that will achieve ...
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Food security is important for humans and other animals 19.10.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
As leaves change colour and drop from trees, and a chill in the air signals the approach of winter, many of us are thinking of the fall harvest and hearty soups and dishes that will soon warm our bellies. Not everyone is lucky enough to enjoy such thoughts. About four million Canadians -- including more than a million children --  lack food security , defined as reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. In Canada, people from low-income households and Indigenous communities are the most likely to suffer from food ...
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Top 10 books to celebrate World Food Day 18.10.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 For quite some time I have been wanting to find a way to share my "good reads" about food, agriculture and communities. World Food Day has motivated me to reflect on the prescience of the timeless classics that I hold dear, as well as some newer books hot off the press. On October 16, 1945, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization was founded in Québec City. Since 1981, October 16 has also been known as World Food Day. And every year, this day carries a particular theme. "Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too" is the 2016 theme. During the past 35 years, themes have also echoed the environment, climate change, and issues of water, rural poverty, food security and more. World Food Day has Lois Ross opening her bookshelf to share good reads about food, agriculture and communities. Here are our farming columnist's top 10 resources this harvest ...
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Millions Face Hunger by 2030 Without 'Deep Transformation' of Agriculture: UN 18.10.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines

A new report from the United Nations released Monday brought another dire warning of the catastrophic consequences of climate change—that without putting immediate environmental safeguards into place, more than a hundred million more people could be driven into extreme poverty and hunger by 2030.

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Food security is more complicated than producing more and wasting less 14.10.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Sunday, Oct. 16 is World Food Day. Many of you might not know it, but this day has been celebrated for the past 37 years. First observed in 1979, World Food Day honours the creation of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) on October 16, 1945 in Quebec, Canada. This year’s theme is, "Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too." It builds upon the FAO’s vision of achieving food security for all through regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active and healthy lives. The FAO’s three main goals ...
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Think U.S. Agriculture Will End World Hunger? Think Again. 6.10.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

U.S. agribusiness spokesmen routinely defend practices that pollute air and water, and destroy soil by claiming that American farmers are doing what it takes to “feed the world.”  

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Rebooting The Food System 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Yesterday marked the beginning of a new global collaboration between the EAT Foundation (EAT), Jamie Oliver Food Foundation (JOFF) and United Nations World Food Programme (WFP): one that takes aim at obesity, hunger, climate change and environmental degradation all together. We're in a crazy moment - we're battling the bulge while staving off hunger. Obesity and malnutrition literally live side by side in communities, and even families, around the globe. At the same time, we're choosing to use what precious natural resources we do have to fuel a food system that's making us - and our planet - sick. We continue to spend our limited resources in ways that threaten our lives, and jeopardize our future generations. By 2040, there will be approximately nine billion of us to feed. With the planet already aching under our pressure, we know this course is unsustainable. We're overweight - obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, with a staggering 30 per cent of us now overweight or obese. That's nearly 2 billion ...
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The Paradigm of the Real Cost and Value of Food 17.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Proverb: Give a man a fish he eats for a day. Teach a man how to fish and he eats for a lifetime. Many might think; this passage is straight from the bible or an ancient Chinese proverb, in fact it is neither. The proverb was actually coined by Anne Isabella Ritchie during the 1880's in a story she wrote titled Mrs. Dymond. Its relevancy however seems so important today as we face alarming rates of poverty, homelessness and food insecurity. According to the United States statistics on hunger 45 million people fall into this category, which translates into 14% of the population. 19% are children, 8% senior. Millions and millions of dollars are spent each year on hunger relief programs and organizations aimed at feeding the poor. Yet, as the economy grows it seems the rich continue to get rich and the poor, poorer while the middle class remains stagnant. I want to know do we really target the root cause of hunger? When we talk about poverty, do we just talk about ways of ending it or do we have ...
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