User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Gardens
Last updated: Jul 29 2014 13:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In West Philadelphia, a fight to save a neighborhood farm 29.7.2014 Philly.com News
At 8 a.m. on a Saturday in mid-July, a time many teenagers prefer to be asleep, Mika'al Broadus, a rising senior at Roxborough High School, was already at work at Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative's University City High School garden, harvesting armfuls of kale.
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Refugees find peace tending global garden in Albany Park 29.7.2014 Chicago Tribune: Popular
It could be a scene from a faraway land — women in long, colorful skirts harvesting mustard leaves, a man with a weathered face and a traditional salwar kameez beneath his suit jacket squeezing between rows — chopped, fermented daikon spread out to ...
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Produce from school gardens increasingly ends up in school cafeterias 28.7.2014 Denver Post: News: Local
This year, another Colorado school district will join the growing national movement to bring fresh vegetables from school gardens into school cafeterias, directly onto the plates of ...
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The art of landscaping 26.7.2014 Durango Herald
Many La Plata County residents don’t even have to step off their property to enjoy the outdoors – they can do it from the comfort of their own backyards. And by polishing their outdoor space and designing customized backyard sanctuaries, they even may be increasing their property value. Most local real estate...
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Adversaries on what's killing bees battle for our hearts and minds 26.7.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
Neither side is waiting for conclusive science on what’s killing the honeybee. They’re taking their fight straight to the public in an intensifying battle for the support of the nation’s consumers.
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This Critically Endangered Baby Rhino Is An Adorable Addition To A Species In Need 24.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This sweet little rhino is not only impossibly cute, he's also critically endangered. Born on July 12, the black rhino calf, who doesn't have a name yet, is a "significant birth," according to staff at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park . Zoo spokesperson Ina Saliklis tells HuffPost she's not sure when it will happen exactly, but "hopefully he will be named soon." Photo credit: Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park “Poaching is the main reason why the numbers of black rhinos are on the decline,” Julie Anderson, a San Diego zookeeper, said in a blog post on the zoo's website . “Any birth here at the Park is an important birth, and we have been very fortunate to have a newborn baby here at the Safari Park.” Indeed, poaching has done a real number on the tiny population of rhinos living in the wild -- and that number is 1,004 . That's how many rhinos, black and white, were killed last year in South Africa alone, according to a government statement. 2013's killings were almost double the number of rhinos killed in ...
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Westminster inks deal to draw energy from community solar gardens 21.7.2014 Denver Post: News: Local
Westminster is joining other communities in providing a way for residents to buy into solar energy without installing solar ...
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GreenSpace: Lead tainted soil and Philadelphia reality 20.7.2014 P-com Living Green
The assumption is simple: If you have vacant land in the city, plant vegetables. There's a lot to be said for local produce and healthy eating.
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Twin Cities teens' locavore salads are a hit with All-Star Game crowd 20.7.2014 Star Tribune: Business
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The joy of crafting food is a little miracle we can tap into again 18.7.2014 L.A. Times - Food & Dining
Images from my Instagram feed slide down the screen: glistening fruit in jars, pickles floating in dill-sprigged brine, wonky handcrafted breads, vinegars infused with herbs from the garden, tomato sauce put up in old wine bottles. Everybody proudly showing off what they've just made.
Local beauty no longer goes unnoticed 18.7.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Amid the pandemonium of everyday life, small treasures hidden within the Yampa Valley often can be hidden from those who visit the area or even those who live here as permanent residents. Revealing local gems in the form of homes and gardens, the Strings 19th annual Kitchen and Garden Tour will showcase beautiful design and the diligence of seven homeowners. Although only three homes will be available for attendees to admire, the gardens at each location will be on display for all to enjoy. “It’s so neat, especially for the tourists to see all the different pockets that Steamboat has,” said Cristen Frey, the non-classical programming coordinator and advertising and marketing director at Strings. “You really get a different feel for this town at each home. Just driving from Burgess Creek to downtown, it almost feels like I went to a whole other state.” Showcasing three unique areas of Steamboat, this year’s tour will focus on historic downtown, mountain side and an area near Catamount Ranch. “You really ...
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Pioneering green roofed building by Ted Cullinan saved from demolition 17.7.2014 TreeHugger
It was designed to stay cool without air conditioning, and the green roof was part of the strategy.
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Black-Owned Businesses Are Quietly Powering Detroit's Resurgence, But No One's Talking About It 17.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Detroit will mark the first anniversary of its bankruptcy filing this Friday, and across the country, people are watching the city to see how it has survived the upheaval. Despite pending cuts for pensioners , as well as widespread poverty, sobering health and violence statistics and a declining population, Detroiters have expressed cautious optimism about recent changes, which include greater investments in development, promises to improve city services and an ambitious plan to eliminate urban blight . The largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history has also stirred up interest in success stories. Though no one person will fix Detroit, some people have received well-deserved attention for their work to improve the city. A New York Times article last month highlighted hot spots in the Corktown neighborhood , and a story in the same paper earlier this year heralded small businesses . But something's missing from those pieces, and from many other articles that examine the city's resurgence: black ...
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Project Sweetie Pie teaches north Minneapolis youth about gardening 17.7.2014 MinnPost
Roderic A. Gholston arrived Wednesday at Karamu Garden in north Minneapolis prepared and eager to execute the day’s work agenda: trellising tomatoes. For him and a dozen other student workers and volunteers, it was a day of hammering wooden posts into the ground, attaching wires and tying tomato stems to the posts. Roderic, 17, worked the previous day at a nearby garden where he planted cabbage, lettuces, tomatoes and other summer greens. He is among dozens of enthusiastic young people working this summer with Project Sweetie Pie , a local initiative that employs and trains youth in urban farming. Michael Chaney, Project Sweetie Pie founder, said the 4-year-old initiative was established to help forge relationships between low-income and more affluent communities. The project was also created to support the development of north Minneapolis and its community. “Most of our low-income communities are socially engineered to be consumers,” Chaney said. “So we wanted to change that paradigm. [The project will] ...
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6 Homemade herbicides: Kill the weeds without killing the Earth 16.7.2014 TreeHugger
It's been said that weeds are just plants whose virtues have not yet been discovered, but if you're tired of waiting to find out what those virtues are, you might want to use one of these homemade herbicides instead of the chemical versions.
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Community groups pin hopes on Obama library 16.7.2014 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Library seen as way to generate jobs, effect change in struggling neighborhoods In a small garden in the South Side's Washington Park neighborhood — blocks from a site proposed for the Obama presidential library — 18-year-old A.J. Jones has found solace tending organic leeks, asparagus and dinosaur ...
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Boulder, Colorado, Celebrates Tube To Work Day 16.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — A few commuters in Boulder, Colorado, may have arrived at work dripping wet because they observed Tube To Work Day.

The lighthearted holiday hit seven years Tuesday. It began with two men tubing to work along Boulder Creek in 2008. Last year, it saw almost 30 participants, some wearing wetsuits and some wearing business suits.

The event typically takes place in June to line up with Boulder's Bike to Work Day. But the Daily Camera reports (http://bit.ly/1qZhv16 ) safety concerns because of the volume of water forced it to be pushed to July this year.

The city of Boulder sponsored a breakfast station off the creek. The public was invited to participate, but commuters were required to bring their own tubes.

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Online:

https://www.facebook.com/TubeToWorkDay

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Information from: Daily Camera, http://www.dailycamera.com/
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10 ways to make your garden more green 15.7.2014 TreeHugger
How green does your garden really grow? Top 10 tips for making sure your garden is chemical free and growing strong.
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The Twin Cities discover tactical urbanism — and create improvisational change 15.7.2014 MinnPost
MinnPost photo by Bill Lindeke Part of St. Paul's Urban Flower Field “I call it the Urban Flower Field,” Amanda Lovelee told me. “It will someday become Pedro Park, but up until a month ago it was a gravel pit with a lot of weeds." Amanda Lovelee is an artist in residence for the City of St. Paul, a program sponsored by Public Art Saint Paul that places artists inside the city’s Public Works Department to collaborate and create public art projects. And Lovelee’s latest project is the Urban Flower Field, a brand new “temporary park” at the site of the former Pedro’s Luggage in Downtown St. Paul. The idea for the park came from Lovelee’s conversations with St. Paul Parks and Recreation . When Pedro’s Luggage closed down, the owners donated the land for a city park. But that park is still two years away from construction, awaiting the demolition of the building next door. In the meantime, the site lay vacant, gathering dust and entropic litter. “When these spaces lay dormant, it leads citizens to feel a bit ...
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Creeping Charlie: What it is, how to get rid of it 14.7.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Creeping Charlie, also called Ground Ivy, thrives in shade and high-moisture environments. The recent heavy rainfall has not helped in that scenario to lessen moisture from soil.
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