User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Gardens
2 new since Aug 27 2014 22:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Here Are Some Totally Weird And Wonderful Facts About Marsupials (You're Welcome) 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marsupials are amazing creatures. Baffling and kind of weird, yes, but also totally amazing. Part of their mystique seems to stem from their uncanny same-but-differentness. After all, koalas sort of look like bears, and wombats resemble chubby rodents. But though marsupials are very much a part of the mammal family, they are also quite different -- in magnificent and bizarre ways -- from the mammals that you might be more accustomed to. Last week, YouTube personality Ze Frank explored some of these fascinating marsupial facts in an irreverently entertaining video about the animals. In the clip, which has already racked up almost 2 million views, Ze Frank discusses everything from kangaroo babies to wombat penises -- and we're pretty sure that each new nugget of marsupial knowledge will blow your mind. Did you know, for instance, that marsupial babies typically emerge from their mothers as teeny, helpless embryos ? Unlike placental mammals (like humans, dogs and whales), marsupial females don't have a ...
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How yards and gardens express culture, identity and neighborliness 27.8.2014 MinnPost
Carolyn Bastick has lived in Minneapolis’ Bryn Mawr neighborhood since 1986, in three different houses, and she loves her neighborhood. “The neighborhood is close-knit,” she told me the other day. “Once someone moves in, they don’t want to leave.” (It might have sounded sinister, like “the village” in Patrick McGoohan’s surreal '70s sci-fi show  "The Prisoner," if Bastick hadn’t been so full of vim.) But probably Bastick’s favorite thing about the neighborhood is the culture of walkable gardens. Over her 28 years, Bastick has watched Bryn Mawr literally blossom into one of the Twin Cities’ prime garden hotspots, and hundreds of people walk and bike through Bryn Mawr yards each year on the garden tour that she organizes. “When I first moved in, really few people did much to their gardens,” Bastick told me. “Maybe there were a few tulips, but there was no garden that really stood out. But now, when neighbors walk by your place and you have created something that is beautiful, they stop and admire it. The ...
DeLaney Community Farm in Aurora trades produce for garden work hours 27.8.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
For more than 10 years, DeLaney Community Farm - which is managed by the nonprofit Denver Urban Gardens - has partnered with the Tri County Health Department to provide Aurora-grown vegetables to WIC members in Aurora in exchange for an extra hand during harvest season, between July and October. Tri County Health funds the WIC program.
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What's Holding Back the Organic Food and Farming Revolution 23.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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D.C.'s Famous Snowy Owl Found Dead In Minnesota 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Washington, D.C.'s snowy owl famously survived being hit by a bus this past winter , but it seems our migratory friend couldn't steer clear of danger. After her accident, our wings were crossed for this tough bird. She was treated at City Wildlife -- the only urban wildlife rehabilitation center in the nation's capital -- then at the National Zoo, before she was ferreted off to the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center for feather transplants and further care. In mid-April, when the owl was released near Superior, Wisconsin , we rather hoped that'd be the last we'd see of her. But on Friday, a message on Minnesota's Raptor Center's website read: Sadly, we're writing today to let you know that The Raptor Center has learned the snowy owl's body has been recovered from the shoulder of a Minnesota highway, near where [she] had been released last spring. The snowy's cause of death is uncertain, but the placement of the body indicates [she] may have been hit by a vehicle. The body was in good condition, ...
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19 Fall garden ideas, projects, and tips to extend your harvest 22.8.2014 TreeHugger
The end of summer doesn't have to mean the end of gardening for the year. Extend your harvest with these projects, tips, and ideas for your fall garden.
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This (Really, Really) Little Cutie May Be The Smallest Dog In Britain 22.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
World, meet Tyson — a teeny chihuahua-mix who might just be Britain’s smallest dog. ‘Britain’s smallest dog’ is four inches tall and weighs less than a bag of sugar: http://t.co/OWKNkZPtoS pic.twitter.com/5QZ2f9AHnf — Yahoo UK News (@YahooNewsUK) August 21, 2014 Born earlier this year, Tyson was reportedly so tiny at birth that his owner Rosemarie McLinden had to feed him with a dropper . “I had to start feeding him myself as he couldn't latch on to his mother," McLinden told Yahoo! News UK. “He was so small he just could not breastfeed due to the tiny size of his mouth.” Though McLinden and her husband initially worried about Tyson, who hasn’t grown much since he was born, it seems the little pup is now fit and healthy — though he remains teeny-weeny, as you can see in the video above. According to the Boston Standard, Tyson — who was named after boxer Mike Tyson "because he is such a little fighter,” McLinden told the news outlet — weighs just a little more than half a pound and is just five inches ...
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How to build unheated greenhouses for winter harvests & year-round gardening (Video) 21.8.2014 TreeHugger
American organic farmer Eliot Coleman explains how his innovative winter gardening methods work, allowing growers to harvest veggies year-round.
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor 21.8.2014 Steamboat Pilot
This summer, I embarked on an adventure in sustainable agriculture. Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program offered the course for the first time and, while it wasn’t a required course, I am so passionate about the topic that I jumped at the opportunity. Sustainable agriculture is crucial to the success of food sustainability and I was eager to get my hands dirty. Grand ideas were rolling around in my head, and I quickly learned that these ideas were much larger than the scope of the class. Simply dabbling in sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor. First and foremost, when planning a garden, soil composition and quality is evaluated so that soil can be prepared in the fall before the snow arrives to ensure a rich, healthy soil capable of nourishing plants the following spring. A quality garden plan should be developed during the winter months and requires an intimate familiarity of the land and consideration of rotational and companion planting concepts. Prior planning also ...
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Why Vegetables Get Freakish In The Land Of The Midnight Sun 21.8.2014 NPR Health Science
Long summer days in Alaska help cabbages, turnips and other vegetables grow to gargantuan sizes. These "giants" are celebrated at the annual state fair, which kicks off on Thursday.
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'Beautiful Little Soul': Therapy Bunnies Help Alzheimer's, Dementia Patients 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It sounds almost too hopping cute to be true, but Teddy the therapy rabbit's first job was tending to his little sister Lulu. Lulu is the most recent addition to Minnesotan bunny enthusiast Jennifer Smith's multi-rabbit household. The animal had been left in a cardboard box next to a dumpster on a cold night this past winter. "A woman saw the box and opened it to find a beautiful rabbit freezing to death," Smith says. Lulu was brought to a local animal shelter, where -- against all odds -- she survived. Smith adopted her soon after that, but the rabbit clearly wasn't well, and Teddy was determined to help. "Our tiny house rabbit Teddy Graham would spend his days lying next to her pen. He rarely left her side," she says. "Lulu just laid there in her sick, broken kind of way. Teddy went right up to her and started kissing her face. ...Teddy saved Lulu, and Lulu adores Teddy for his devotion to her." Teddy Graham and Lulu. Photo credit: Jennifer Smith As of early August, Lulu and Teddy Graham are able to ...
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Urban farms build resilience within Singapore's fragile food system 20.8.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Singapore may be one of the most affluent countries in the world, but it depends heavily on others for basic foodstuffs. A new crop of farmers is trying to change that.
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Urban Farms Build Resilience Within Singapore's Fragile Food System 20.8.2014 NPR News
Tiny Singapore imports almost all its food. From gardens on deserted car parks to vertical farms in the vanishing countryside, a movement is afoot to help boost its agricultural production.
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Eating Healthy in Hungary 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It wasn't particularly easy to find vegetarian cooking in Hungary when I was there in 1990. This was the land of goulash and chicken paprikas, after all. And forget about organic produce. In those days, even in the United States, organic agriculture and organic products were a decidedly niche market. When the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements met for their 1990 conference in Hungary, it was the first time they served organic food as part of their gathering -- such was the difficulty of sourcing the ingredients in those days. This was before the transformation of consumer attitudes toward food that accompanied the growth of huge organic farms -- what Michael Pollin once called the organic-industrial complex . This in turn produced the economies of scale that allowed for the sale of organic produce in supermarkets and the use of organic ingredients in fast food chains like Chipotle. So when I met Ferenc Fruhwald in 1990, he was way ahead of the curve. He had founded Biokultura in ...
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Sculpture Garden renovation plans firming up; Heart of the Beast facing financial challenges 19.8.2014 MinnPost
After 25 years and more than 8 million visitors, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s infrastructure needs attention. Areas identified as “deterioriated and inadequate” by the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board are irrigation, drainage and stormwater systems, walkways and retaining walls. Accessibility and energy efficiency require updating, and the glass-enclosed Cowles Conservatory, home to Frank Gehry’s “Standing Glass Fish,” is due for renovation. The MPRB has received $10 million in public funding for the project: $8.5 in state bonding funds from the Minnesota Legislature in May, and up to $1.5 million from the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization. Water is a particular problem in the low-lying garden, which was built on a former marshland. Mary Abbe reports that the Oslund and Associates landscape architecture firm and Snow Kreilich Architects are likely to be chosen for the project. If approved by the MPRB at its meeting in early September, a community engagement process will begin in ...
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Art Aboard: Is This Awesome Shanty-Yacht Our Post-World Flooding House? 19.8.2014 Terrorism

Art Aboard: Is This Awesome Shanty-Yacht Our Post-World Flooding House?Photos via Michael Bixler, Hidden City How would you survive if the world became completely flooded? That's pretty much the question that artist Mary Mattingly and crew seek to shed some like upon and answer with WetLand, a six-week interactive...


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How Growing Your Own Vegetables Will Make You A Happier Person 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The vegetable garden represents a small effort on the part of the gardener to be a producer and not just a consumer, to give and not take, to create something beautiful and useful where nothing existed before. The well-planned and carefully tended vegetable garden can turn a barren field into a colorful landscape, a hot tenement roof into an elevated green space, or a small balcony into a thriving ecosystem. In literature, the garden symbolizes innocence, fertility, potential, and growth. And so, it is with great expectation that we prep the soil, sow the seeds, and await the fruits (and vegetables) of our labor. The new gardener will soon find that patience and stoicism are required. We are forced to move at the pace of the seasons and hope for favorable weather. "To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted..." -- Ecclesiastes 3:1-2 Planting flowers, vegetables, trees, ...
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Balancing Nature and Human Needs on the Designer Ark 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When my wife and I lived in the forests of the Congo several years ago, we had a friend and neighbor named Kauteli. He liked or was indifferent to animals that did not threaten his family, damage his crops, or eat his seeds. But he did all in his power to keep at a distance those that menaced his family's safety, food security, or livelihood. Kauteli's wife grinding delicious and nutritious peanut butter. Gambian giant rats and baboons can easily destroy precious seed stores. Photo © Dr. Edward Tronick. That Kauteli would rather not live with some wildlife put him in conflict with the conservation community, who like me (a European-educated biological research scientist) typically advocate for protecting all of nature's parts and the ecological roles each and every species plays. Though saving all of nature is, I would argue, a good thing for humanity and the planet, it is a viewpoint that can at times be myopic to the needs and interests of those who must live with wild nature. Kauteli is not alone. ...
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People In North Texas Just Adopted More Than 2,200 Animals In One Day 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Post by City of Arlington, TX - Animal Services . All in all, "Empty the Shelter Day" was a huge win in many ways, said both organizers and participants. Not only did the event help to increase the visibility of animal shelters in their communities, but — given that overcrowding is an especially urgent problem in shelters during the summer — it was also critical in the saving of many, many lives. KXAS-TV reported, for instance, that one participating shelter, Dallas Animal Services, was euthanizing 50 to 60 animals every single day this summer because it simply didn't have space for them; on Saturday, however, the shelter found homes for 149 of its 150 animals . The day's success could perhaps be best summed up in a photograph posted by the Texas chapter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, one of the event’s co-sponsors, at the end of the adoption effort. “Look at those empty kennels,” the organization wrote on Instagram. “#emptytheshelter...#savealife.” Encouraging pet adoption by ...
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'Borderfree': Creating Freedom and Beauty in a World at War 18.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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