User: flenvcenter Topic: Food-National
Category: Food Production :: Gardens
Last updated: Apr 30 2016 18:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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'Thor's' Chris Hemsworth keeps the myth alive in Malibu 30.4.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Bicoastal actors Chris Hemsworth and Elsa Pataky, who call Australia home, have swung a pair of deals in Malibu, selling their house for $7 million and buying another property nearby for $3.45 million.

On the sale side, the couple saw a solid return on investment in the deal for their Point Dume-area...

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Put down those dumplings and try the scallion pancakes at these 7 San Gabriel Valley restaurants 29.4.2016 L.A. Times - Food & Dining

The scallion pancake, also known as cong you bing, is a thin, unleavened fried pancake found all over China, Taiwan, Hong Kong — and at most Taiwanese restaurants and dumpling houses in the U.S. Just think of it as the dependable, less glamorous older sister of the dumpling. And although it's the...

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Image of Asia: Watering the garden in Sri Lanka 29.4.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

In this photo by Eranga Jayawardena, a man waters his vegetable garden cultivated on the banks of the Kelani River in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Many Sri Lankans living in urban areas maintain kitchen gardens for their daily consumption.
Home & Garden Expo will offer expert tips and advice Saturday 29.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Green thumbs and budding green thumbs, get ready for planting season. Despite the dreary remains of winter, it will soon be time to dig into a new year of fresh soil, and Saturday’s Home & Garden Expo will help kick off the season. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Steamboat Springs Community Center, more than 20 vendors from the local home and garden industry will showcase the newest products and techniques, along with lawn and garden advice from CSU Master Gardeners. What: Home & Garden Expo When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 30 Where: Steamboat Springs Community Center, 1605 Lincoln Ave. Rain or shine, there will be something for the whole family, with kids activities that include a bubble machine, lawn games, a seed planting station and an appearance by the Steamboat Springs Fire Department. Explore Steamboat sought out advice from five local experts who know what does and doesn't work in Routt County’s short, often chilly, growing season. Susan Allen CSU Master Gardener for about 10 years What are ...
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Council encourages 'vertical farming' 29.4.2016 Philly.com News
City Council introduced resolutions Thursday calling for the expansion of vertical and urban farming in Philadelphia. Vertical farms use artificial lighting and climate control to grow vegetables, herbs and fruits year-round without sunlight or soil.
Cute treehouse. Now tear it down. 27.4.2016 TreeHugger
Toronto dad is told to remove the treehouse he built for his kids and the city is outraged.
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9 superfoods you can grow yourself 27.4.2016 TreeHugger
From quinoa to chia seeds and goji berries, make these nutrition superstars super local by growing them in your home or garden.
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$500K challenge to improve local food supply gets underway 27.4.2016 Chicago Tribune: Business
On your mark … get set … grow! The  Food to Market Challenge — a collaboration between The Chicago Community Trust and Kinship Foundation — is officially underway. At stake: a cool $500,000. The winner-takes-all competition, challenging teams to improve the supply of local and sustainable food ...
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Colorado Master Gardener: Season extenders bring freshies to spring plates 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Sick of wilted boxed salad greens and bunches of kale that are past their prime? One of the many things Yampa Valley gardeners have going for us is our cool climate — perfect for cool-season crops and especially greens of all kinds. Add simple “season extension” to your bag of gardening tools and start having salad and baby greens in as little as 30 days. Season extenders can also be used to start tender frost-phobic vegetables and herbs such as tomatoes and basil well before our average last frost date in mid-June. First, a brief primer on basic gardening terminology. Perennials live from one growing season to the next, storing their energy in their roots during the winter — locally, think shallots, asparagus, horseradish and rhubarb; reliable perennial herbs include thyme, French tarragon and chives. Annuals grow for only one season and are either root or leaf crops — radish, beans, squash and basil. Additionally, all plants have a hardiness characteristic. Most cool-season vegetables can tolerate ...
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Cultivating a generation 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
The Yampa Valley Autism Program is cultivating more than just vegetables. Its Community Cultivation program, established for individuals with disabilities and at-risk youth, cultivates life and social skills that help its members grow right alongside the produce. With 25 members, many of whom are diagnosed with autism, the nonprofit relies on a mix of teachers, paraprofessionals and student staff members utilizing horticulture to create a work environment that gives members the experience of an employee. “It provides responsibility and challenges in an environment that is relaxing and therapeutic,” says Yampa Valley Autism Program Executive Director Lisa Lorenz. Built and maintained by a mix of students from local high schools and middle schools, and those looking to build skills before joining the work force, the biggest project, a $20,000 greenhouse, was made possible in 2013 through donations from different foundations. It has evolved into a 22-foot-long, off-the-grid, solar-powered garden dream ...
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Hoop houses 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
One of the most straightforward ways for controlling a gardening environment is the hoop house, a semi-circular tunnel structure encapsulating a garden. Also known as a polytunnel or hoop greenhouse, hoop houses can be built through custom construction or purchased as a kit, using the basic principles of metal or PVC ribs to support a plastic layer to protect plants from the elements. At Elkstone Farm in Strawberry Park, three 2,100-square-foot hoop houses make all the difference for extending the gardening season year-round to produce enough greens for winter and summer farm stands, local businesses and inventory the farm offers through the Community Agriculture Alliance’s online marketplace. The same hoop house principles that help larger ranches extend the season can be downsized for use in a backyard garden, too. Here are a few tips to create a successful backyard hoop house: • Use PVC pipe or a similar material for the tunnel’s ribs. Pipes should be placed double the width of the desired garden ...
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Indoor gardens 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
With Steamboat’s short growing season, why not extend it to produce fresh produce year-round? From microgreens to tomatoes, it’s easier than you think with a small scale indoor garden. While it won’t yield the same results as a sunny outdoor garden, the flavor can’t be beat when outdoor growing isn’t an option. Microgreens: Microgreens are a quick and easy way to add flavor and crunch to any wintertime plate. Just plant seeds labeled for sprouting or microgreens in a shallow container filled with a sterile potting or seed-starting mix. Within two weeks you’ll be harvesting nutritious mini vegetables and herb leaves for salads, sandwiches or snacking. You can also grow your favorite herbs on a warm sunny windowsill. Select a container with drainage holes and set on the appropriate size saucer to protect your woodwork. Fill the container with well-drained potting mix and plant seeds or transplants. Purchase basil, chives, parsley, oregano and rosemary plants from your local garden center or the produce ...
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10 tips for creating a raised-bed garden 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Want your garden to grow to new heights, while saving your knees for Steamboat’s ski slopes? Try a raised bed for easier access and greater productivity. Raised beds let you overcome the region’s poor, clayish soil by creating an ideal growing mix, while making gardening time easier thanks to less bending and kneeling. A few things to consider: Sun rules: Locate it in a sunny area if possible. Most plants require at least six hours of sun, and vegetables like tomatoes and peppers produce best with a full day of sunlight. Material matters: Select a long-lasting material such as interlocking block, fieldstone, plastic lumber or long-lasting wood like cedar. The bed’s material will influence its shape. Some materials allow for curved beds while others are limited to squares, rectangles and other angular shapes. Space needs: Design your raised bed to fit your space constraints. A 3- or 4-foot width makes it easy to reach all parts of the garden for planting, weeding and harvesting. Raising your bed eight to ...
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Community Roots 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Tucked in the alleyway behind Lincoln Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets, a garden blossoms each year and brings together the community around it. The 20 plots in the Roots Community Garden, an initiative guided by the CSU Master Gardener program, are rented out each year by an assortment of families, businesses and groups. The garden was kickstarted in 2010 by the Leadership Steamboat class, which took advantage of property originally acquired by the county for a new justice center. In 2012, local high school student Garrett Pohlman teamed up with Routt County Maintenance to take it on as his class project, cleaning up the plots and turning it into a well-kept, open-to-the-public oasis in the heart of downtown, complete with picnic tables for lunch. The plots cost $25 each and are rented on a first-come first-served basis, mostly by locals who either don’t have enough space for their own gardening or want to practice under the guidance of Master Gardeners. Groups and businesses also rent them out. ...
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Straw bale gardens 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
With no shortage of straw in the Yampa Valley, add productive garden space and raise your planting bed with straw bale gardening. Gaining new popularity thanks to Joel Karsten’s book “Straw Bale Gardens,” the technique allows gardeners to create raised bed gardens on a patio, lawn or any area with poor compacted soil. All you need are a few straw bales, fertilizer, a bit of compost and time to condition, plant and water the garden. Procurement and preparation Purchase straw bales made from alfalfa, wheat, oats, rye or other cereal grain that have less weed seeds than hay. Start a few weeks before the designated planting date. Place the bales in their permanent location with the cut sides up and twine parallel to the ground. Once you start the condition process, the bales will be very heavy and hard to move. When the bales are in place, start the conditioning process to start the inside of the straw bales composting, so they’ll support plant growth. On day one, spread fertilizer over the top of the ...
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Hot Property: From presidential pads to mobile homes 23.4.2016 LA Times: Commentary
For you comparison shoppers, we've put this newsletter in the order of highest- to lowest-priced properties. Really, it was no trouble at all. And for those who like to read the last page of the book first to find out how things turn out, here's a cover blurb: This week's offerings range from $69...
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Durango sixth-graders win award by illuminating food waste problems 23.4.2016 Durango Herald
In honor of Earth Day, two sixth-graders illuminated the challenges and solutions surrounding food waste in mini-documentaries and took first place in a contest open to all Durango middle school students.“It was really playful, it was educational and it was full of information,” said Lauren Berutich, the grass-roots...
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10 things to get excited about this spring in Steamboat 22.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Despite Mud Season woes, there is plenty to look forward to in the next few weeks. Rain peeking through rays of sunshine, snow banks melting into puddles and the fresh scent of springtime — what’s not to like? Grab your calendars and pencil in your springtime plans. 1.) April showers bring May flowers It’s time to start exercising that green thumb. If you’re not sure how, there’s resources right at your fingertips at the annual Home and Garden Expo on Saturday, May 16 at the Steamboat Springs Community Center. Local landscapers, interior designers and CSU master gardeners will be there to give advice and chat about beautifying your garden. Home & Garden Expo | 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | Saturday, May 16 | Steamboat Community Center, 1605 Lincoln Ave. 2.) Yampa River Botanic Park Revel in nature at a park nestled along the Core Trail. Entry into this oasis of trees, flowers and native plants is free and open to the public. The park is open daily from dawn to dusk. The first day of the season is May 1. 3.) Giving ...
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Northglenn works with Westminster to cut costs, grow flower program 21.4.2016 Denver Post: Local
Inside a greenhouse on the eastern edge of Westminster, Northglenn parks employees move between rows of thousands of flower sprouts that are just beginning to peak through the dirt inside tiny seedling ...
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Colorado Master Gardener: Thanks, Deb 20.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Sixteen years ago next month, Deb Babcock wrote her first gardening article for Steamboat Today. She researched dozens and dozens of gardening topics and created a trusted, well-informed series of gardening articles that have become a must-read for our community. And this spring, she’s putting away the keyboard in an effort to find more time for gardening and travel. The Blue Sky Pottery shop Deb owns and operates in Steamboat Springs has many tributes to her love of gardening. Creating paintings of landscapes, vases to hold flowers and ceramic vegetable garden identifiers labeling, ‘Fennel,’ ‘Carrots,’ and ‘Not a weed’ will fill her time now. I visited her at her shop recently to ask her what it has been like to be the main author of the weekly Master Gardener articles. When asked, Deb said her favorite subject matter changed from time to time. “It’s kind of like when people ask what my favorite hike is,” she said. “It’s usually the last one I took.” Researching the science behind different gardening ...
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