User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Aug 18 2017 03:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust 18.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Researchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution-control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.
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Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in Pompeii 17.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhoea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.- The concentrations were high and were definitely problematic for the ancient Romans. Their drinking water must have been decidedly hazardous to health.
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Capitalist Economies Create Waste, Not Social Value 17.8.2017 Truthout.com
More production means more waste: more waste means more production. Waste is a sign of capitalism's success. In this excerpt from Creating an Ecological Society, Fred Magdoff and Chris Williams show the immense levels of waste created by capitalism today, including the prison-industrial complex, food system and housing in the United States -- not to mention the horrendous expensive and wasteful US military. (Photo: hroe / iStock / Getty Images Plus) What would a truly just, equal and ecologically sustainable future look like? Why would it require a change in our economic system, namely the end of capitalism? Fred Magdoff and Chris Williams answer these questions in Creating an Ecological Society: Toward a Revolutionary Transformation. Suffused with radical hope, this book can be yours with a donation to Truthout! In this excerpt, Magdoff and Williams show the immense levels of waste created by capitalism today, including the prison-industrial complex, food system and housing in the United States -- not ...
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Voices of the Palestinian Diaspora: Ramzy Baroud and Rima Najjar on Identity and Resistance 17.8.2017 Truthout.com
Palestinians have been artificially divided for nearly seven decades, but from generation to generation, members of the Palestinian diaspora have neither forgotten their identity nor despaired. Diasporic Palestinians are fundamental to the struggle for equality and justice in several key ways, say journalist and author Ramzy Baroud and retired English professor Rima Najjar. An activist holds up a Palestinian flag during a protest outside the White House on the day Donald Trump meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu February 15, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) Help Truthout supply a counterpoint to the dangerous rhetoric and misinformation spewing forth from Washington DC. It takes less than thirty seconds to contribute via card or PayPal: Just click here! Uprooted from their native dwellings, loved ones and joint heritage, Palestinians have embraced a steadfastness ( sumud ) that has been one of the principles of their struggle for justice. For over 69 years since ...
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Habitat destruction and poaching is threatening the Sungazer 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The Sungazer (Smaug giganteus), a dragon-like lizard species endemic to the Highveld regions of South Africa, is facing an assault on two fronts as farming and industrialisation encroaches on its natural habitat – which already consist of only a several hundred square kilometres globally – while the illegal global pet trade is adding pressure on pushing the species into extinction.
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Urban floods intensifying, countryside drying up 16.8.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A global analysis of rainfall and rivers by UNSW engineers has discovered a growing pattern of intense flooding in urban areas coupled with drier soils in rural and farming areas.
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New process allows live look inside insects 16.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Until now, live insects have been too wriggly to make good subjects for scientists wanting to understand more about insect innards. But an interdisciplinary team of biologists and imaging specialists from Western has worked out a novel micro-imaging solution that’s leading to unprecedented new ways of viewing insect development.
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Neo-Nazi Emboldenment and the Rise of Illiberal Democracy 16.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Police with binoculars and a rifle position themselves on a roof across the street from the Charlottesville City Hall before Jason Kessler, a white nationalist organizer, tried to speak outside the Charlottesville City Hall on August 13, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. The police often stood by as white supremacists escalated violence against anti-racist counter-protesters. (Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images) If the neo-Nazis feel especially emboldened to come out of the shadows now, it's because elements of their neo-fascist ideology have found a comfortable place at the highest levels of the current administration, including with Trump himself. Such normalization of hate and bigotry is usually the first step to authoritarianism. Police with binoculars and a rifle position themselves on a roof across the street from the Charlottesville City Hall before Jason Kessler, a white nationalist organizer, tried to speak outside the Charlottesville City Hall on August 13, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. ...
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Frogs That Adapt to Pesticides Are More Vulnerable to Parasites 16.8.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Amphibians can evolve increased tolerance to pesticides, but the adaptation can make them more susceptible to parasites, according to a team that includes researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The research, led by Binghamton University, showed that wood frogs that evolved increased tolerance to pesticides showed greater susceptibility to a dangerous virus, although they also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to a parasitic worm.“We have only recently begun to understand that amphibians can rapidly evolve tolerance to chemicals like pesticides, which on the surface is good news,” said Rick Relyea, a professor of biological sciences and director of the Darrin Fresh Water Institute at Rensselaer. “But now comes the bad news: with that tolerance there is a tradeoff, which is that they become more susceptible to parasites that, in the case of ranavirus, can wipe out entire amphibian ...
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Universities are learning how to accelerate sustainability 16.8.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
How much do we know about how universities pursue sustainability in a whole-systems way? Well, we're learning.
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University of Delaware look at adding silicon to soil to strengthen plant defenses 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
To help plants better fend off insect pests, researchers are considering arming them with stones.The University of Delaware’s Ivan Hiltpold and researchers from the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment at Western Sydney University in Australia are examining the addition of silicon to the soil in which plants are grown to help strengthen plants against potential predators.The research was published recently in the journal Soil Biology and Biochemistry and was funded by Sugar Research Australia. Adam Frew, currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Charles Sturt University in Australia, is the lead author on the paper.
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University of Sydney charges ahead on zinc-air batteries 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
University of Sydney researchers have found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks preventing zinc-air batteries from overtaking conventional lithium-ion batteries as the power source of choice in electronic devices.Zinc-air batteries are batteries powered by zinc metal and oxygen from the air. Due to the global abundance of zinc metal, these batteries are much cheaper to produce than lithium-ion batteries, and they can also store more energy (theoretically five times more than that of lithium-ion batteries), are much safer, and are more environmentally friendly.
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In the Wake of Charlottesville, Let's Call for Structural Transformation 15.8.2017 Truthout.com
A vigil is held in downtown Philadelphia on August 13, 2017, in support of the victims of white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend. (Photo: Jessica Kourkounis / Getty Images) Opposing white supremacist mobilizations is important in the defense of marginalized people and civil society. But focusing mainly on the acts of individuals or emotions like "hate" obscures the role of structural racism in white supremacist violence. To prevent more acts of violence, we must confront and eradicate the structural foundations of white supremacy. A vigil is held in downtown Philadelphia on August 13, 2017, in support of the victims of white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend. (Photo: Jessica Kourkounis / Getty Images) Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a one-time or monthly donation by clicking here. White supremacist James Alex ...
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Mercury is altering gene expression 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The mercury found at very low concentrations in water is concentrated along the entire food chain, from algae via zooplankton to small fish and on to the largest fish — the ones we eat. Mercury causes severe and irreversible neurological disorders in people who have consumed highly contaminated fish. Whereas we know about the element’s extreme toxicity, what happens further down the food chain, all the way down to those microalgae that are the first level and the gateway for mercury? By employing molecular biology tools, a team of researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has addressed this question for the first time. The scientists measured the way mercury affects the gene expression of algae, even when its concentration in water is very low, comparable to European environmental protection standards. Find out more about the UNIGE research in Scientific Reports.
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Preserving one of world's most endangered primate species 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
All day long, for five straight months, Sheila Holmes slipped through the Madagascar rainforest, 16,000 kilometres away from her Calgary university classes, eyes and feet following black-and-white ruffed lemurs as they flew through the trees.Holmes was not your average tourist on this Indian Ocean island off the eastern coast of Africa. Instead, this University of Calgary student, who is now working on her anthropology doctorate, became a crucial part of what is the longest continuous monitoring program of one of the most endangered primate species in the world.
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Charlottesville Was Not a "Protest Turned Violent," It Was a Planned Race Riot 15.8.2017 Truthout.com
White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" exchange vollies of pepper spray with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images) In July of last year, after The New York post ran the headline, "CIVIL WAR: Four cops killed at anti-police protest," I wrote the  column  "How We Report on Structural Racism Can Hurt Us -- Or Heal Us." I could have easily written the same article today. That column recalled the Kerner Report, the findings of President Johnson’s commission investigating the uprisings that occurred throughout 1967, to determine what happened and why, and to provide recommendations to prevent them from happening again. While reading and watching the news stories unfolding from the college town of Charlottesville, Virginia, what I and many others are calling White nationalist race riots,  I couldn’t help but recall the Kerner Report again. A fundamental ...
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How to care for a chef's knife 15.8.2017 TreeHugger
It's arguably the single greatest tool one can have in the kitchen, so treat it with respect!
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Charlottesville Survivor: There's No Question, This Was Terrorism 14.8.2017 Truthout.com
An injured counter-protester is wheeled into an ambulance during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 12, 2017. (Image: Democracy Now!) We spend the hour examining the "Unite the Right" white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend that erupted into violence, resulting in three deaths. After a torchlit march of hundreds on the University of Virginia campus Friday night, more than 1,000 white nationalists descended on the city on Saturday to oppose a plan to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a city park. They were met by anti-racist counterdemonstrators, and fights broke out before the rally began. Witnesses report police did little to intervene. Shortly after the protest began, a man later identified as James Alex Fields drove his vehicle into a crowd of counterdemonstrators in what many are calling an act of terrorism. A local paralegal named Heather Heyer was killed in the attack, and at least 19 others were injured. Two Virginia ...
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UVA's Historical Ties to KKK and White Nationalist Alums Richard Spencer and Jason Kessler 14.8.2017 Truthout.com
Jalane Schmidt, an organizer with the local Black Lives Matter movement and an associate professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia, describes the school's history of connections to the KKK and its alumnus, white nationalist leader Richard Spencer. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: Well, Jalane Schmidt, didn't the president of University of Virginia, fearful of violence, tell people not to go out to meet the white supremacists? Can you talk about the organizing and the -- just what took place this weekend? And on Sunday, you passed the white supremacist Richard Spencer? I mean, there were a number of people there. David Duke was there, celebrating President Trump, in fact. JALANE SCHMIDT: Yes. Well, with regard to the statement put out by University of Virginia President Teresa Sullivan, it was a very tepid statement. And, yes, again, as she did with the letter before the Ku Klux Klan rally on July the 8th, again encouraging university affiliates to avoid protesting this rally. And what was ...
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Why all cars should be hi-viz, drivers should wear helmets and car radios should be banned 14.8.2017 TreeHugger
"If it only saves one life..."
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