User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: May 31 2016 22:04 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 18,359    
Freedom From Violence: Lessons From Black Prisoner Organizing 31.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
From the cover of Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era. (Image: The University of North Carolina Press) The following is an excerpt from Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era , which won the 2015 James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians. Collective rebellions are episodic. Expanded technologies of control and limited leftist movements on the outside have made such rebellions even rarer in prisons. But the long-standing black critique of the American criminal justice as a system of racial dominance continues, aided and abetted by the existence of resurgent opposition to prisons beginning in the late 1990s and with added ferocity since the economic collapse of 2008. In 1998, two organizations formed with direct connections to the previous generation of prison protest. Bo Brown, who spent seven years in prison for her involvement with the Seattle-based clandestine George Jackson Brigade, and Angela Davis were part of the ...
Also found in: [+]
On the News With Thom Hartmann: Nanosized Plastics Are Seriously Harming the Ocean, and More 31.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In today's On the News segment: Nanoparticles in the ocean have the ability to cross biological barriers, such as the intestinal wall and brain; unless fossil fuels are kept in the ground, global temperatures could rise more than 11 degrees Fahrenheit by 2300; will the latest Fukushima wake-up call go unheard?; and more. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here -- on the best of the rest of Science and Green News... You need to know this: Nano plastics are seriously harming the ocean. It now appears that plastics account for nearly 80 percent of all waste found in our oceans. This plastic gradually breaks down into smaller and smaller particles -- until they are microscopic or nano. New research by Lund University in Sweden looks into how nanosized plastic particles affect life in the ocean food chain. Karin Mattsson with the study said, "We tested how polystyrene plastic particles of different sizes, charge and surface affect the zooplankton Daphnia. It turned out that the size of the nanoparticles that were most ...
Also found in: [+]
The Right Marches on Brazil 28.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Sabrina Fernandes

Brazil’s new interim president Michel Temer’s motto seems to be: “Injure all at once, and perhaps, one day, return benefits little by little.” Existing social gains, especially those won by the Workers’ Party (PT), are already being eroded. His government hopes the Brazilian people will swallow this bitter pill in hopes of a vaguely defined payoff later.

Also found in: [+]
In Memory of Michael Mariotte—Activist, Journalist, Musician 28.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Lawrence Reichard

Long-time anti-nuclear activist, journalist and punk rock drummer Michael Mariotte died May 16 at the age of 63 in his home in Kensington, Md., after a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer.  Mariotte was executive director of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS) in Takoma Park, Md., for 27 years.  Under Mariotte's leadership NIRS became a key information resource for anti-nuclear activists around the world.  

Also found in: [+]
Britain's timid university lecturer protest will change nothing in a rigged system 27.5.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

read more

Also found in: [+]
Solving "Wicked Problems" - the Road to a Better World? 27.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What makes a problem "wicked" rather than just daunting, formidable or really, really tough? Wicked problems are ones in which we operate with incomplete or contradictory and rapidly-changing information with a large number of stakeholders and with connections to many other problems. How to provide nutritious, satisfying and sufficient food for 9 billion of our neighbors in a sustainable and affordable way is an example of a wicked problem. By DNV GL Chief Sustainability Officer Bjørn K. Haugland; and Professor Kevin Noone, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), Stockholm University. It's clear that dealing with wicked problems will require a far greater degree of collaboration and cooperation than most of us are used to applying in our day jobs. We will need to assemble new constellations in which not only stars shine, but where everyone can contribute to illumination. What is equally true, but perhaps less clear is that fixing these constellations in the sky requires ...
Also found in: [+]
Inspirational teachers share their story on improving student performance (CPD points) 27.5.2016 Planet Ark News
Join the very popular Grounds for Learning Teachers Webinar hosted by Planet Ark and Cool Australia on the 16th June from 4 - 5 pm.
Also found in: [+]
Spring comes sooner to urban heat islands, with potential consequences for wildlife 26.5.2016 Environmental News Network
With spring now fully sprung, a new study by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers shows that buds burst earlier in dense urban areas than in their suburban and rural surroundings. This may be music to urban gardeners’ ears, but that tune could be alarming to some native and migratory birds and bugs.
Also found in: [+]
How Nanotechnology Can Help Us Grow More Food Using Less Energy and Water 26.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ramesh Raliya , Washington University in St Louis and Pratim Biswas , Washington University in St Louis With the world's population expected to exceed nine billion by 2050 , scientists are working to develop new ways to meet rising global demand for food, energy and water without increasing the strain on natural resources. Organizations including the World Bank and the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization are calling for more innovation to address the links between these sectors, often referred to as the food-energy-water (FEW) nexus. Nanotechnology - designing ultrasmall particles - is now emerging as a promising way to promote plant growth and development. This idea is part of the evolving science of precision agriculture , in which farmers use technology to target their use of water, fertilizer and other inputs. Precision farming makes agriculture more sustainable because it reduces waste. We recently published results from research in which we used nanoparticles, synthesized in our laboratory , in ...
Also found in: [+]
Trudeau fails to deliver on election promise to support Indigenous post-secondary students 26.5.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. In the 2016 federal budget, Trudeau failed to deliver on his explicit election commitment to invest $50 million per year in the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP), a federal initiative that provides support to Indigenous and Inuit students pursuing post-secondary education. Instead, the Liberals invested no new funding in the ...
Also found in: [+]
Student Activism Pushes UMass to Become First Major Public University to Divest 26.5.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

University of Massachusetts students—who just over one month ago were arrested for demanding that their school divest from fossil fuels—were validated on Wednesday after it was announced that the school would become the first major public university to pull its direct holdings from polluting industries.

The decision was made by a unanimous vote of the Board of Directors of the UMass Foundation, which oversees the endowment, valued at $700 million at the end of the last fiscal year. 

Also found in: [+]
Keep Oil in the Soil: Bill McKibben on Being Named by Sanders to DNC Platform Committee 26.5.2016 Democracy Now!
Bill McKibben was just named by Bernie Sanders to serve on the platform committee at this year's Democratic National Convention. He joins Sanders’ other four appointments: scholar and racial justice activist Cornel West; Native American activist Deborah Parker; Minnesota Congressmember Keith Ellison, who chairs the Congressional Progressive Caucus; and Palestinian rights activist and scholar James Zogby, who founded the Arab American Institute. We speak with 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben about how he’ll seek to translate his activism into Democratic Party platforms in Philadelphia in July.
Also found in: [+]
Anti-war protests take aim at CANSEC 2016 and global arms trade 26.5.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, May 26, 2016 Actions in Ottawa and Montreal target CANSEC 2016 and Canada's involvement in the global arms trade, specifically the controversial deal with Saudi Arabia. Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Ottawa-based group Homes Not Bombs held two actions on May 24 and May 25 to protest the 2016 Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CANSEC) military trade ...
Also found in: [+]
Bernie Sanders Easily Wins the Policy Debate 26.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Jeffrey D. Sachs

Mainstream U.S. economists have criticized Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’s proposals as unworkable, but these economists betray the status quo bias of their economic models and professional experience. It’s been decades since the United States had a progressive economic strategy, and mainstream economists have forgotten what one can deliver. In fact, Sanders’s recipes are supported by overwhelming evidence — notably from countries that already follow the policies he advocates. On health care, growth and income inequality, Sanders wins the policy debate hands down.

Also found in: [+]
The Political Bob Dylan 26.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Folksinger Joan Baez sang Bob Dylan's "The Times They Are A-Changing" at a Bernie Sanders rally in San Jose last week. Nobody knows what Dylan thinks of the current political scene because he turned his back on politics many years ago. But it doesn't matter what Dylan -- who turned 75 this week -- thinks because his music has a life of its own. It resonates with today's young activists just as it inspired their counterparts in the 1960s. When the makers of Hollywood movies, documentary films, or TV news programs want to evoke the spirit of the 1960s, they typically show clips of long-haired hippies dancing at a festival, protestors marching at an antiwar rally, or students sitting-in at a lunch counter, with one of Dylan's songs--"Blowin' in the Wind" or "The Times They Are a-Changin'"--playing in the background. Since he emerged on the music since in 1961, Dylan has gone through many personal, religious, and artistic transformations. But journalists and historians still treat Dylan's songs as ...
Also found in: [+]
Is BDS Simply a 'Campus Movement?' How Deceitful Can Thomas Friedman Actually Be? 26.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On May 25 the New York Times published an op-ed by Thomas Friedman with the incendiary title, "Netanyahu, Prime Minister of the State of Israel-Palestine," which attempts to show just how far the Israeli Prime Minister has gone to destroy any notion of a two-state solution. That Friedman would have only now caught on to the demise of such a possibility should indicate just how far out of touch he is. Friedman spends his space talking about Netanyahu's purging of Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, and his naming of "far-right Avigdor Lieberman" as his Yaalon's replacement. But he begins his piece with this entrée: "Israel has recently been under intense criticism on the world stage. Some of it, like the 'boycott, divestment, sanctions' (B.D.S.) campaign, is a campus movement to destroy Israel masquerading as a political critique." Friedman seems to take always alluding in some way or another to BDS as an obligation. Not only does he do so with remarkable consistency, he also always gets it wrong. More than ...
Also found in: [+]
Striking Workers Shut Down France's Oil Depots, Move to Blockade Nuclear Plant 25.5.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

Striking workers with the Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT), one of France's largest unions, are clashing with French government forces after the union members blockaded oil refineries and depots in response to President François Hollande forcing unpopular labor reforms through parliament earlier this month.

Also found in: [+]
This Confirms It was a Coup: Brazil Crisis Deepens as Evidence Mounts of Plot to Oust Dilma Rousseff 25.5.2016 Democracy Now!
A key figure in Brazil's interim government has resigned after explosive new transcripts revealed how he plotted to oust President Dilma Rousseff in order to end a corruption investigation that was targeting him. The transcripts, published by Brazil's largest newspaper, Folha de São Paulo, document a conversation in March, just weeks before Brazil's lower house voted in favor of impeaching President Rousseff. Romero Jucá, who was then a senator but became a planning minister after Rousseff's ouster, was speaking with a former oil executive, Sérgio Machado. Both men had been targets of the so-called Car Wash investigation over money laundering and corruption at the state-controlled oil firm Petrobras. In the conversation, the men agree that ousting President Rousseff would be the only way to end the corruption probe. In the transcript, Jucá said, "We have to change the government so the bleeding is stopped." Machado then reportedly said, "The easiest solution is to put Michel in"—a reference to Vice ...
Also found in: [+]
With Women and Doctors in Danger, House GOP Called to End 'Witch Hunt' 25.5.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

Backed by key women's health and civil liberties groups, 178 House Democrats on Tuesday sent a letter to Republican Speaker Paul Ryan demanding he disband an anti-choice investigative panel that has been issuing subpoenas to abortion providers and medical researchers around the country.

Also found in: [+]
CUNY Professors and Staff Consider Future Strike to Defend Public Education Funding 25.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
At the City University of New York, the city's public higher education system, unionized professors and staff have turned to confrontational tactics, including authorizing use of the strike, to obtain a long overdue contract from management and protest cuts to public education funding. Professional Staff Congress members march during the 2015 Labor Day parade on September 12, 2015, to highlight their lack of a contract. (Photo: Brandon Jordan) Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this one: We depend on reader support! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation today. Higher education in the United States is facing serious problems with state disinvestment, lack of protections for adjuncts and low pay for faculty, among other reasons. The situation is no different at the City University of New York (CUNY), where the problems have affected professors, staff and students for decades. But 92 percent of the Professional Staff Congress (PSC), the union representing more than 25,000 CUNY professors and ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 18,359