User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Oct 21 2017 03:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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University of Toronto biologists discover an epigenetic key to unlock behavioural change in fruit flies 20.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
When it comes to behaviour, researchers have moved beyond the “nature versus nurture” debate. It’s understood that genes and environment both play a role. However, how they interact at a molecular level to shape behaviour is still unclear.A new study led by scientists at the University of Toronto sheds valuable light on this relationship. The paper, published in  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, reveals how epigenetics – changes in gene expression that do not change DNA – interact with genes to shape different feeding behaviours in fruit flies. This research unlocks the molecular mechanism that leads “rover” flies to forage for food more than “sitter” flies.
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These 4 data streams provide the key to smart buildings 20.10.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
To power sustainable office campuses and commercial buildings, Navigant Research highlights these areas for investment.
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Episode 97: Carbon pricing goes mainstream; Global Goals accelerate 20.10.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
In this week's episode, companies find value in the circular economy, partnering for global green growth and a visit with an inspiring educator.
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Scientists Map Monogamy, Jealousy in the Monkey Mind 19.10.2017 Environmental News Network
It’s perhaps one of the most common emotions to feel in a relationship, but one that’s virtually untouched when it comes to studying relationships in monogamous primate species. What scientists have recently discovered about jealousy in pair-bonded titi monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) offers insight into human emotions and their consequences.
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Wisconsin Governor Walker and His Appointees Push Policy to Punish Students Protesting Right-Wing Speech 19.10.2017 Truthout.com
In the latest attempt to silence protesters, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and his appointees on the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents are pushing a new policy that would suspend or expel students who protest right-wing speech on campus. Thomas Gunderson, an organizer for Our Wisconsin Revolution, discusses why the legislation lacks legitimacy.  Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin speaks at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference on March 13, 2016, in National Harbor, Maryland. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 84th in the series.  Click here for the most recent interview before this one . The battles over "free ...
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Impact of Amazonian Hydropower is 'Significantly Underestimated', Study Finds 19.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research.
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Food insecurity and quality a big concern for Atlantic region's First Nations 19.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Newly published results from a study on food security and quality in First Nations communities in the Atlantic provinces show that food insecurity is rampant and that many households would like more access to traditional foods. The study found that 31% of First Nations households in the Atlantic provinces are severely or moderately food insecure, compared to the national average of 8%.The First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study (FNFNES), led by the University of Ottawa in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations and the University of Montreal, is the first national study of its kind. The recently published report for the Atlantic provinces details the dietary patterns, lifestyle and general health status of over 1,000 adults in 11 randomly selected First Nations communities.
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Illinois Sportfish Recovery a Result of 1972 Clean Water Act, Scientists Report 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Populations of largemouth bass, bluegill, catfish and other sportfish are at the highest levels recorded in more than a century in the Illinois River, according to a new report. Their dramatic recovery, from populations close to zero near Chicago throughout much of the 20th century, began just after implementation of the Clean Water Act, the researchers say.
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DNA Tests on Albatross Poo Reveal Secret Diet of Top Predator 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
A study that used DNA tests to analyse the scats of one of the world’s most numerous albatrosses has revealed surprising results about the top predator’s diet.
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Extreme weather puts focus on climate change adaptation for buildings 18.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Forest fires in British Columbia. Floods in Quebec. Hurricanes in Texas. While it’s difficult to say definitively that such events are caused by climate change, there’s little doubt that a warming world exacerbates such extreme weather—and that our society will need to be ready for more of them.These are the kinds of issues on Anika Bell’s mind as she prepares to pursue her master’s of applied science at the University of Victoria in the new year. Bell’s previous research was featured in an infographic at the Livable Cities Forum in Victoria in September, where planners, policymakers and other professionals across Canada discussed ways to build cities equipped for current and future climate change impacts.
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New Imaging Approach Maps Whole-Brain Changes from Alzheimer's Disease in Mice 17.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
An estimated 5.5 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease, a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Although treatments can slow the worsening of symptoms, scientists are still working to better understand the neurodegenerative disease so that curative and preventative medicines can be developed. A new imaging system could help speed new drug development by offering a better way to monitor the brain changes indicative of Alzheimer’s in mouse models of the disease. 
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Study Shows How Water Could Have Flowed on 'Cold and Icy' Ancient Mars 17.10.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
For scientists trying to understand what ancient Mars might have been like, the red planet sends some mixed signals. Water-carved valleys and lakebeds leave little doubt that water once flowed on the surface. But climate models for early Mars suggest average temperatures around the globe stayed well below freezing.
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Blueprint for a Progressive US: A Dialogue With Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin 17.10.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Bianca Pontes / EyeEm) Expanding educational opportunities and building a green economy -- while shrinking both the military and the fossil fuel industry -- are the best routes to full employment, say world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin. Also, greater financial regulation and more public development banks that prioritize social welfare over massive profits are crucial for a progressive agenda. (Photo: Bianca Pontes / EyeEm) You can fuel thoughtful, authority-challenging journalism: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout. This is the first part of a wide-ranging interview with world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin. The next installment will appear on October 24. Not long after taking office, it became evident that Donald Trump had engaged in fraudulent populism during his campaign. His promise to "Make America Great Again" has been exposed as a lie, as the Trump administration has been busy extending US military power, ...
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New biomass plant to cut Simon Fraser University's greenhouse gases by two-thirds 17.10.2017 Environmental News Network
A new project at Simon Fraser University (SFU) will soon divert wood waste from the landfill and help reduce greenhouse gasses at the University.SFU and SFU Community Trust are collaborating with Corix Multi-Utility Services Inc., on a $33-million community-based biomass project called the Burnaby Mountain District Energy Utility (BMDEU).
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Purdue's President Takes Aim at the Left 17.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. Purdue University President Mitch Daniels made it clear to anti-racists that he's more interested in attacking them than the fascists who are organizing on campus in a letter to well-known pro-Palestine and anti-racist professor Bill Mullen that accuses Mullen of being "anti-Semitic." Daniels, the former governor of Indiana and a Bush Jr. administration official, wrote the letter in response to a statement sent by Purdue's Campus Antifascist Network chapter, calling on him to look into several examples of fascist organizing on campus, including flyers circulated by the white nationalist Identity Evropa. Instead of taking the threat of the far-right organizing seriously, Daniels saw this as an opportunity to attack Mullen, writing, "In the past, I have had to defend your right to speech that was widely interpreted as racist, in the form of that oldest ...
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Imagining a regenerative economy in California's Central Valley 17.10.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Hubs of innovation can bring about a new era of agriculture and diversify beyond ag tech.
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Why save the small town? 17.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Cities may seem inevitable, but rural communities are finding ways to hang on.
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Voices of Resistance: Centering the Needs of Black Women in Mississippi 16.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. As a child growing up in Jackson, Mississippi, Cassandra Welchlin witnessed the struggles her mother endured working as a maid. She also learned the importance of serving those in need from her foster grandmother, who instilled in her the importance of taking care of the community's elderly and disadvantaged. Welchlin took those lessons with her to Jackson State University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in social work in 1997, and to Brandeis University, where she received a graduate degree in sustainable international development in 2005. Now a licensed social worker, Welchlin works for the  Mississippi Low Income Childcare Initiative  (MLICCI), which champions affordable child care for low-income working parents. In 2014 she cofounded the  Mississippi Women's Economic Security Initiative  as a project of the MLICCI to promote policies that ...
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Pass the "Right to Know" Act Now, Demand Families of People Killed by New York City Police 13.10.2017 Truthout.com
Holding one police officer accountable will not end police violence and abuse, we need strong policy changes, say Victoria Davis and Victor Dempsey, siblings of Delrawn Small, who was fatally shot and left to die by an NYPD officer in July 2016. Delrawn's family wants the city council to pass a Right to Know Act, which would require police to identify themselves and explain their reason for intervention. From left to right: Iris Baez, mother of Anthony Baez (killed by NYPD in 1994); Hawa Bah, mother of Mohamed Bah (killed by NYPD in 2012); and Victor Dempsey, brother of Delrawn Small (killed by NYPD officer in 2016), speak at a rally supporting the proposed Right To Know Act in New York City, on October 11, 2017. (Photo: Alberto Morales) We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with ...
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Lost in Translation: Understanding the campus free expression debate 13.10.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Jacqueline Houston What's happening on Canadian university campuses? It is a familiar question to anyone that's read any of the myriad of editorials, columns and think pieces on the state of campus free speech today. A list of relevant incidents should be equally familiar -- student protestors shut down a talk by pulling a fire alarm; a controversial speaker pre-emptively cancels their campus appearance due to security concerns; a University of Toronto psychology professor, purportedly against political correctness, sparks a national debate on the boundaries between free speech and discrimination. The dominant story goes something like this: free expression as a principle is on the decline on Canadian campuses today. Taking its place is a culture of political correctness, safe spaces and students that prioritize other principles, like social justice and community standards of tolerance, over unfettered speech. Clear battle-lines have been drawn, and where you stand seems to come down to whether you think ...
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