User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Jun 22 2017 05:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pursuing The Idea Of Neighbourhood School 22.6.2017 Editorial – The Navhind Times
THE state government’s decision to enforce the ‘neighbourhood school’ concept from next year is going to change the admission policy of the government-aided schools. According to government guidelines, school managements have to give preference in admission to students residing within 1-5 km radius of the school, but the rule has been hardly followed. The government ...
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Student's zero-waste architecture is grown with 'mushroom sausages' 21.6.2017 TreeHugger
This designer has developed a technique where strong and lightweight structures are cultivated with mycelium and cardboard.
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Trump's Apprenticeship Program Should Help Train Coal Miners For Solar Jobs 21.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that boosts American  apprenticeships . It will double the amount of money for apprenticeship grants and move control of the program away from the federal government to the private sector. Often with these internships, workers are paid while being trained for a new job, so it preferentially benefits the  nearly half  of Americans finding it hard to make ends meet. This program could be a real boon for industries like solar, which are desperate  for skilled workers, as well as existing workers trapped in declining industries. Trump has repeatedly shown great interest in America’s coal industry, which has faced a steep decline in profitability. One major American coal company after another has  filed  for bankruptcy, and coal is declining globally. Even  China  is moving away from it. The industry is shedding jobs, and it has an enormous negative impact on health. Coal is responsible for killing about as many Americans every year from pollution ( ...
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Why Did Democrats Ossoff And Parnell Lose Their Congressional Races In Georgia And South Carolina? 21.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Democrats around the country were hopeful that they could win two special elections Tuesday in what had long been “safe” Republican districts in Georgia and South Carolina. Instead, both Democratic candidates — Jon Ossoff and Archie Parnell — narrowly lost. Why did they lose? Pundits and politics will be debating this question for a long while, but here’s one factor that made a huge difference: Low turnout among African Americans. If this sounds familiar, it should. It explains why Hillary Clinton lost Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania to Donald Trump last November by a total of 77,000 votes. Had she won those three states, she would have won the Electoral College and would be occupying the White House today. Democrat Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the Atlanta suburbs attracted the most attention and the most money. Last November, no political expert expected Georgia’s 6th Congressional district to be a hotly-contested swing district. For many years it was represented by right-wing Republican Congressman ...
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This app helps corporate buyers evaluate solar and wind projects 21.6.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
New service from the Business Renewables Center simplifies the comparison of contracts, including virtual power purchase agreements.
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Why There Are Costs To Moral Outrage 20.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Justin Tosi , University of Michigan and Brandon Warmke , Bowling Green State University Many Americans are morally outraged that U.S. President Donald Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey, who had been investigating possible links between Trump’s election campaign and the Russian government. Many others are angry that Comey accused President Trump of lying about the FBI. Still others are mad that Trump then accused Comey of lying under oath before Congress. Soon something else will stoke people’s moral outrage. A look at any partisan news source or social media site will show people expressing maximum anger at all hours of the day. What explains all of this outrage? The world isn’t really getting worse. But people have incentives to act like it is. New technologies give virtually anyone, at any given moment, a platform to express anger. These new ways of communication, from Twitter to Facebook, allow anyone to express outrage at the newest political dust-up or celebrity gaffe . And by ...
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Art Of Iranian Immigrants Reveals The Creative Potential Of Inclusivity 20.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In January, President Donald Trump issued an executive order denying citizens from seven Muslim-majority nations entry into the United States. In the months since, multiple courts have deemed the ban unconstitutional , arguing that it discriminates against Muslims.  Yet Trump is still pushing strongly for the directive , filing an emergency request with the Supreme Court earlier this month and penning increasingly incensed tweets expressing his frustration with the Justice Department.  Not long after Trump first announced his plans for the ban, art institutions around the U.S. responded to denounce the executive order as fundamentally opposed to values of inclusion, diversity and liberty. New York’s Museum of Modern Art made its convictions known by hanging work made by artists hailing from affected nations  on its walls. The Davis Museum at Wellesley College used a different approach to convey a similar message. The museum  temporarily removed all artwork made by or donated by immigrants from the museum ...
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Egypt: Seven Men Tortured in State Custody Face Execution; 90 News Websites Blocked 20.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In Egypt, seven men are facing imminent execution based on confessions that human rights activists say were extracted under torture. Six of the men are recent college graduates who were arrested in 2014 along with more than a dozen others. While their testimony was captured on camera, the men say they were beaten, shocked with electricity and hung in painful positions and then provided with written testimonies they were forced to read. They were sentenced to death last month on terrorism charges after a military trial. In other news from Egypt, dozens of activists have been arrested in a series of sweeping raids in recent days. The arrests and raids come amid a nationwide crackdown against human rights activists and press freedom advocates. Over the past few weeks, the Egyptian government has blocked access to at least 93 news sites, including Al Jazeera, Huffington Post's Arabic website, the self-publishing platform Medium and the local independent news site Mada Masr. We speak to the Egyptian film ...
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Cerebral Palsy Didn't Stop This College Junior. Obamacare Repeal Might. 17.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
HILLIARD, Ohio ― Justin Martin, 21, is in many respects a typical junior at Kenyon College. He lives in an off-campus apartment, which he shares with six other guys. He’s majoring in English, helps run a student improv group, and last semester he took five courses instead of the usual four ― a “terrible idea,” he now concedes. Sometimes he pulls all-nighters to write papers or study for exams, drawing sustenance from soda and chocolate-covered almonds. And sometimes he stays up late just to have long arguments with his roommates ― like over whether it’s OK to ban campus speeches by white supremacists (Martin says no) or whether the seventh Harry Potter novel was the worst (Martin says yes). But in one respect, Martin is unique on the Kenyon campus and rare among college students in general. He has cerebral palsy, the disease that severely impairs muscle movement. Martin cannot walk or care for himself without assistance. His life in college ― getting to room with his fellow students, carrying a ...
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Welfare and Imprisonment: How "Get Tough" Politics Have Excluded People From Society 17.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In her new book Getting Tough: Welfare and Imprisonment in 1970s America, historian Julilly Kohler-Hausmann examines the effects of the US's deadly "get tough" politics that began with Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan. The emphasis on incarceration over education and health has resulted in the wholesale exclusion of many working-class communities of color from claims to citizenship. As opposition to Trumpism rekindles the necessity of doing politics at the local and state levels, it's important to note that reactionary ideas gestate at the local level before they get nationalized. And, with enough organizing, so too might emancipatory ones. (Photo:  VOCAL-NY / Flickr ) Getting Tough: Welfare and Imprisonment in 1970s America, Julilly Kohler-Hausmann, Princeton University Press, 2017 Opponents of the US prison-industrial complex have long insisted that the problem is bigger than the unprecedented number of people this country locks up. The problem is how much the criminal legal system penetrates the ...
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Trump Killed A Key Obama Immigration Program. But What He Didn't Do Matters More. 17.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― The Trump administration formalized an immigration policy shift on Thursday evening that was notable for what it didn’t do as much as what it did. The Department of Homeland Security rescinded DAPA , a never-implemented program that would have allowed some undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents to stay in the country. But more significantly, it left in place the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, a policy that President Donald Trump promised to eliminate, and one that has shielded hundreds of thousands from deportation. By Friday, the Trump administration was insisting that the president hadn’t gone back on his promise to end DACA. And even defenders of the program remain cautious about its future prospects. Still, nearly 150 days into his time in the White House, Trump hasn’t rescinded DACA ― not on Day One of his presidency, as he pledged during the campaign; not when he radically reshaped immigration policy early in his administration; and not on ...
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Trump Takes Aim at Obama's Détente With Cuba 16.6.2017 Truthout.com
President Donald Trump speaks about US-Cuba relations at the Manuel Artime Theater in Miami, June 16, 2017. Trump announced Friday that he was reversing crucial pieces of the Obama-era policy of engagement with Cuba. (Photo: Al Drago / The New York Times) Trump has rolled back some of Obama's steps toward normalization of US-Cuba relations, citing Cuba's human rights record. This rationale is spurious, considering Trump's own dealings with Saudi Arabia, which has a horrendous human rights record. Trump's cutbacks will only hurt ordinary Cubans and Americans and the several businesses established after Obama's détente with Cuba. President Donald Trump speaks about US-Cuba relations at the Manuel Artime Theater in Miami, June 16, 2017. Trump announced Friday that he was reversing crucial pieces of the Obama-era policy of engagement with Cuba. (Photo: Al Drago / The New York Times) HAVANA -- Making good on his deal with Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) and Rep. Mario Díaz-Balart (R-Florida), President Donald ...
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Economic Update: When the US Government Destroyed a Political Party 16.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Economic Update  is in partnership with  Truthout.org Your radio station needs Economic Update! If you are a radio station,  check this out . If you want to hear Economic Update on your favorite local station,  send them this . Visit Professor Wolff's social movement project,  democracyatwork.info. Permission to reprint Professor Wolff's writing and videos is granted on an individual basis. Please contact  p rofwolff@rdwolff.com  to request permission. We reserve the right to refuse or rescind permission at any ...
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Phoenix launches a hub for the circular economy 15.6.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A new incubator from the Arizona State University and the city of Phoenix finds ways for both public and private organizations to overhaul waste.
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What the anti-Shariah rallies point to 15.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Islamophobia and Trumpism are bringing disparate right-wing groups together.
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Why This Year's UK Election Feels Like a Victory After 20 Years of Neoliberalism 14.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
UK's general election did not immediately result in a Labour government, but it did represent a victory for an alternative to the neoliberal policies that have dominated British politics for two decades. In the face of media scorn, Jeremy Corbyn has energized sections of the British public ignored by and disillusioned with the major parties, and exorcized the ghosts of Blairism. Jeremy Corbyn campaigns in West Kirby, England, May 20, 2017. (Photo: Andy Miah ) In 1997, I voted for the first time in a British general election, and voted Labour. I was woken up on the morning of May 2 by a knock on the door of my room at college and the amazing news that the Conservatives were out. The "nasty party," the party of Margaret Thatcher and the  Poll Tax  and an endless shower of racist homophobes, was out after almost two decades in power. Any lingering doubts about "New" Labour's shift to the center -- and about the fact that Tony Blair, the new prime minister, seemed like the kind of man who'd say anything to ...
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Want to Get "Back to the Land"? You're Not Alone 14.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Over the past century, generations of young people have turned their backs on city life to embrace small-scale farming and back-to-the-land ideals. The exact circumstances for each generation's return have varied: the Great Depression in the 1930s, the Vietnam War in the '60s and '70s, and, more recently, the loss of ecosystems and biodiversity to industrial agriculture and climate change. Each generation has had one common desire: to live a more honest, ethical life of self-sufficiency and oneness with nature. Young farmers today face serious structural obstacles: access to affordable land, a steep (and often self-financed) learning curve, debilitating student loans, and lack of access to health care. But three back-to-the-land farmers managed to succeed in a fickle vocation that seems to demand equal parts skill, determination, and luck. What choices did they make, and are their experiences instructive for struggling young farmers today? Jean-Martin Fortier: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants In the ...
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Ralph Northam Wins In Democratic Primary For Virginia Governor 14.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam defeated former congressman Tom Perriello in the Virginia Democratic gubernatorial primary on Tuesday, handing a humbling loss to progressive activists who had flocked to Perriello’s candidacy. Although Perriello enjoyed greater support among millennials, liberals and residents of Southwestern Virginia, his campaign hopes depended on getting many of them to turn out for the first time. Ultimately the 42-year-old Charlottesville native and former diplomat was not able to expand the electorate enough to offset Northam’s advantage with more consistent Democratic voters, including many black Virginians and seniors. “It’s still an uphill climb for groups that are farther to the left to succeed even in a Democratic Primary,” said Geoffrey Skelly, an expert in state politics at the University of Virginia. “There’s a lot of excitement. But at the end of the day, there are a lot of Democratic voters that are center-left and not left.” “We fell short tonight at the polls, but ...
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This Virginia Democratic Primary Is A Crucial Test For The Party’s Progressive Wing 13.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― Virginia Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam squares off against progressive favorite Tom Perriello on Tuesday in the state’s highly competitive Democratic gubernatorial primary, where the left flank hopes national momentum will carry it to a win. Thanks to Virginia’s status as one of two states with gubernatorial races this year (the other is New Jersey ), the primary has attracted historic levels of attention and resources from Democrats eager to land a blow against President Donald Trump . Northam, a 57-year-old pediatric neurologist, had locked up the support of virtually every major elected official in Virginia and was poised to cruise to the nomination until Perriello, a 42-year-old former diplomat and one-term congressman, announced his run in January. Thanks to the endorsements of Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), the country’s leading progressive politicians, and firm stances on several controversial issues, Perriello has excited the state’s younger and more liberal ...
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Sanders Movement Plots Democratic Party Takeover At Weekend Gathering 13.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
CHICAGO ― After Sen.  Bernie Sanders  (I-Vt.) finished his speech to a packed theater of his supporters on Saturday night, he took time to answer a few pre-taped questions from activists. They wanted to know Sanders’ advice for talking to kids about climate change, overcoming Republican gerrymandering in the South ― and how to deal with losing elections, something a questioner comically noted Sanders knew a thing or two about from his early years in politics.  “To those people who are losing right now, I’m sure they’d like to hear what got you through those dark times of losing over and over and over again. ... What got you through in those dark times?” television actor Kendrick Sampson asked, affectionately teasing Sanders. “Thank you very much, Kendrick,” Sander deadpanned, eliciting laughs from the audience. “Kendrick makes a good point: Don’t get locked into a moment, because things change and sometimes they change very, very rapidly.” Sanders went on to recount how he lost several campaigns for ...
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