User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-Independent
Category: Campus
Last updated: Mar 23 2017 03:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Immigration Officers Test Boundaries Of Rules Discouraging Arrests At Schools, Churches 23.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
AUSTIN, Texas ― For years, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents have generally obeyed a simple rule when it comes to schools, churches, hospitals and demonstrations ― they don’t arrest people in those places, which are deemed “sensitive locations.” So far, President Donald Trump, who campaigned on a promise to ramp up deportations and let ICE agents off the leash , hasn’t officially changed the sensitive locations policy . Undocumented people should still be safe from deportation in most cases while attending church or school. But ICE agents are testing the bounds of the rule. Last month, they arrested men who had just left a church-run hypothermia shelter in Virginia. On Feb. 28, they arrested a father dropping off his children at school. And for a month, Trump’s Department of Education has refused to explain how it will ensure students get an education regardless of their immigration status or that of their parents — or whether it believes schools should allow ICE agents inside.   The situation ...
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Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse: study identifies options to sustain ranching and help wildlife 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.
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"Super sponge" promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a spongethat can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds. Thanks to the application of nanotechnology, the team developed a sponge with outstanding mercury adsorption properties where mercury contaminations can be removed from tap, lake and industrial wastewater to below detectable limits in less than 5 seconds (or around 5 minutes for industrial wastewater). The sponge converts the contamination into a non-toxic complex so it can be disposed of in a landfill after use. The sponge also kills bacterial and fungal microbes.
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Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.
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Reaffirm Our National Community By Forgiving Student Debt 22.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The election of 2016 forced us, like so many Americans, to reconsider much of what we imagined we knew about our country and our society. For example, only a few months ago there was a growing, nation-wide movement for tuition-free higher education. At the time, we proposed debt forgiveness for the many Americans – the figure now stands at 43 million – who carry the burden of student loans. Now, all three branches of government are under the control of ideologues who espouse a harsh and individualistic brand of conservatism. That forces us to ask ourselves: How can we pursue such an ambitious and visionary goal when we are confronted with a direct challenge to the communitarian ideals that have guided this nation to its best achievements? And yet, individually and together, we have reached the same conclusion: this is a more important time than ever to reaffirm our bravest and highest values. Jubilee – the ancient concept of debt forgiveness as an affirmation of community – reflects those values. We can ...
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Students fighting to raise the minimum wage 22.3.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Labour On this week's episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Jessica Chen and Jermaul Newell. They are students at York University in Toronto and are active with the campus chapter of the Fight for $15 and Fairness, which is working to raise the minimum wage, improve basic employment standards, and build solidarity between students and workers. The extensive mobilizing by low-wage workers pushing to raise the minimum wage has been one of the most widespread and energetic movements of recent years. It has taken different forms in different jurisdictions, but across North America these campaigns have come together under the common banner of the Fight for $15, which encapsulates the core demand of a raise in the minimum wage to $15/hr. Though the outcomes of these campaigns have also varied from place to place, they have won at least some level of increase in minimum wages in a lot of jurisdictions, and they have won commitments to phase in the full $15/hr amount in more than few. Though ...
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The Culture of Cruelty in Trump's America 22.3.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Trump's culture of cruelty views violence as a sacred means for addressing social problems and organizing society. Trump's culture of cruelty views violence as a sacred means for addressing social problems and organizing society. (Image: JR / TO ; Adapted: Auntie P , Tallapragada ) A culture of cruelty and callousness has become an organizing principle of everyday life under Trump, infusing our society with massive amounts of misery, suffering and violence. But getting rid of Trump alone will not solve this problem unless we first eliminate the mindset that equates democracy with unbridled capitalism. Trump's culture of cruelty views violence as a sacred means for addressing social problems and organizing society. Trump's culture of cruelty views violence as a sacred means for addressing social problems and organizing society. (Image: JR / TO ; Adapted: Auntie P , Tallapragada ) This story was published thanks to readers like you. Donate now to support Truthout's fearless, independent coverage. For the ...
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A new, gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Yale scientists have developed an ultra-thin coating material that has the potential to extend the life and improve the efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries, one of the most promising areas of energy research today.In a study published online March 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe the new material — a dendrimer-graphene oxide composite film — which can be applied to any sulfur cathode. A cathode is the positive terminal on a battery.
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Sustainable Mineral Supply 21.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
International research team warns of mineral supply constraints as demand increases for green technologiesAn international team of researchers, led by the University of Delaware’s Saleem Ali, says global resource governance and sharing of geoscience data is needed to address challenges facing future mineral supply.Specifically of concern are a range of technology minerals, which are an essential ingredient in everything from laptops and cell phones to hybrid or electric cars to solar panels and copper wiring for homes. However, base metals like copper are also a matter of immense concern.
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"Flying saucer" quantum dots hold secret to brighter, better lasers 21.3.2017 Environmental News Network
A research team led by University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering ‘squashes’ the shape of nanoparticles, enabling inexpensive lasers that emit light in a customized rainbow of colours
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Sustainable Mineral Supply 21.3.2017 Environmental News Network
International research team warns of mineral supply constraints as demand increases for green technologiesAn international team of researchers, led by the University of Delaware’s Saleem Ali, says global resource governance and sharing of geoscience data is needed to address challenges facing future mineral supply.Specifically of concern are a range of technology minerals, which are an essential ingredient in everything from laptops and cell phones to hybrid or electric cars to solar panels and copper wiring for homes. However, base metals like copper are also a matter of immense concern.
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This Group Is Taking People To Church — To Make Them More Powerful Citizens 21.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
At a time of political unrest, one group is hoping to rekindle people’s faith in the power they hold as ordinary citizens. Through a new event series called Civic Saturday , the nonprofit Citizen University is inspiring hundreds of people in Seattle to learn to become more powerful, active citizens. Just days after President Donald Trump’s election, the initiative began bringing people together to discuss the polarized political climate and what everyday Americans can do to create change in their communities. “[The event] is renaming things we’ve taken for granted, which under this administration are being challenged : not just inclusivity, but rule of law,” Citizen University founder Eric Liu told The Huffington Post. Liu, author of You’re More Powerful than You Think : A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen, is the executive director of the Aspen Institute  Citizenship and American Identity  program. “[Civic Saturday events] are about what it means to be responsible for one another in a community,” ...
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Violence Against the Transgender Community Is Often Not Told by Media 20.3.2017 Truthout.com
Janine Jackson interviewed Kris Hayashi about the Supreme Court's non-ruling on trans students for the March 10, 2017, episode of CounterSpin. This is a lightly edited transcript. MP3 Link Janine Jackson: Listeners may know the name Gavin Grimm, the transgender teen boy from Virginia whose case for his right to use the boys' bathroom in his high school the Supreme Court has just declined to hear. You are less likely to know the name Ciara McElveen, a New Orleans outreach worker for the homeless, or Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, a nursing student in South Dakota, two of the at least seven trans women killed violently just so far in 2017. The failure of institutions like the Court to prioritize the human rights of transgender people, and the daily violence committed against them, might seem like two separate, if related, stories. But maybe it's really only one story, about continued resistance to accepting transgender people, including kids, as fully human, deserving of inclusion and protection. We're joined ...
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A Woman Purposed To Be A King 20.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Before my mother was a King, she was a Scott from Marion, Alabama, the daughter of resilient, righteous parents, Obadiah and Bernice, who drove the bus that transported my mother and other black students to school. Coretta Scott was born to a woman who supported community. Before my mother was a King, she climbed trees and wrestled with boys. And won. Even as a child, Coretta Scott demonstrated that her gender would not deter her success, nor did it detract from her strength. Before she was a King, my mother was a civil rights activist, a member of the NAACP and the Race Relations and Civil Liberties Committees at Antioch College. Coretta Scott was determined that her life would serve to lift others. She was already a woman of great character. Before my mother was a King, she was a gifted vocalist and musician, whose skill and academia garnered her a scholarship to the prestigious New England Conservatory for Music in Boston. Coretta Scott’s path to Boston exemplified her commitment to being a woman of ...
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Baltimore is using the SDGs to build a more just city 20.3.2017 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This story originally appeared at Citiscope, a nonprofit news outlet that covers innovations in cities around the world. More at Citiscope.org.In April 2015, this aging industrial city an hour north of Washington, D. C., suddenly rose to the top of national newscasts. A young black man named Freddie Gray had died after suffering injuries to his spine while in police custody for a minor offense, and the city had begun to boil.
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Behind a Corporate Monster: How Monsanto Pushes Agricultural Domination 19.3.2017 Truthout.com
A farmhand loads genetically modified corn seed into a planter on Bo Stone's farm in Rowland, North Carolina, April 20, 2016. (Photo: Jeremy M. Lange / The New York Times) Monsanto, one of the world's biggest pesticide and seed corporations and leading developer of genetically modified crop varieties, had a stock market value of US$66 billion in 2014. It has gained this position by a combination of deceit, threat, litigation, destruction of evidence, falsified data, bribery, takeovers and cultivation of regulatory bodies. Its rise and torrid controversies cover a long period starting with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, chemicals used as insulators for electrical transformers) in the 1940s and moving on to dioxin (a contaminant of Agent Orange used to defoliate Vietnam), glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide), recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, a hormone injected into dairy cows to increase their milk production), and genetic modified organisms (GMOs). Its key aim in dealing with ...
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The Turkey-Netherlands Spat Is A Reminder Of A New Specter Haunting Europe 18.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
ISTANBUL ― Flying back to Istanbul after a warm week in Britain ― where it felt liberating to be away from the constant political chatter back home ― I came to the shocking realization that the Netherlands, of all things, had been dominating Turkey’s news cycle in my absence. In Germany , and now in the Netherlands , Turkish politicians who support Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s proposal for an executive presidency in the upcoming April referendum, had been barred from organizing public rallies for Turks there who can vote, I learned. Those countries are important in my personal history ― I lived in them and wandered in their streets. I fell in and out of love in their bohemian quarters. And in my 20s, they represented freedom to my youthful mind, even while I was witnessing the rebirth of a specter in their dark corners ― the specter of  “the barbarian.” 'Turks are ugly, regressive and violent; they are rapists and murderers; they need to be stopped.' This is the message spreading in Europe ...
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College's Break With Climate Change Deniers Riles Debate Over Divestment Strategies 17.3.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Barnard College’s Board of Trustees announced earlier this month that it had made a “unique” climate decision. After months of deliberation and mounting pressure from students, faculty and activists, Barnard, like hundreds of other institutions and colleges, had decided to divest from fossil fuels.  But there was a twist. Unlike some institutions that have opted for full divestment from the industry — in other words, getting rid of all stocks, bonds and investment funds linked to fossil fuels — the New York college had chosen a different tactic: It would instead specifically divest from companies that “deny climate science or otherwise seek to thwart efforts to mitigate the impact of climate change.” Barnard, which has about $18 million of investments in the fossil fuel industry, says it is the first U.S. college to take this “ unique and innovative approach ,” adding that the strategy was not a “compromise between the polar positions of no divestment and full divestment.” Rather, “we believe that it is ...
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Astronomers observe a dying red giant star's final act 17.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Using a powerful telescope, scientists view spiral pattern of gaseous emissions around LL Pegasi and its companion star.
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Why water splashes: new theory reveals secrets 17.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
New research from the University of Warwick generates fresh insight into how a raindrop or spilt coffee splashes.
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