User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environment
Last updated: Mar 23 2017 09:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 87,583    
Sweet Plan to End Deforestation Announced by Cocoa Industry 23.3.2017 Planet Ark News
Nestlé, Mars and 10 other leading chocolate companies come together to tackle deforestation in the global cocoa supply chain.
Also found in: [+]
Sending Packages Using Green Logistics 23.3.2017 Planet Ark News
Deutsche Post DHL Group, the world's largest mail and logistics company, has announced ambitious new targets to reduce all logistics-related emissions to net zero by the year 2050.
Also found in: [+]
Utah State appeals to keep Torrey Green sex assault investigation records private 23.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah State University is going to court and asking a judge to prevent the release of some documents created during an investigation of sexual assault allegations against former football player Torrey Green. The school originally denied a records request filed in early September by Salt Lake Tribune reporter Alex Stuckey, but was ordered last month by the State Records Committee to release some documents. The committee ruled some documents should be public others it deemed could be public with r... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Social media reacts to Dallas Green’s death 23.3.2017 Philly.com News
Also found in: [+]
How Recycled Water Could Revolutionise Sustainable Development 22.3.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By 2025, absolute water scarcity will be a daily reality for an estimated 1.8 billion people . In a world where vital resources are increasingly scarce, nations cannot afford to flush them down the drain. But that is exactly what we do. After we use water in our homes and businesses, it is washed away , and takes many valuable resources with it. Waste water is rich in carbon and nutrients and – if collected and treated properly – it could provide new water, fertiliser, and energy. A number of nations and major cities have already built sophisticated waste water treatment plants that effectively recover nutrients and bioenergy, and produce “new water” that can be reused. But more than 80% of all waste water still currently flows into natural ecosytems, polluting the environment and taking valuable nutrients and other recoverable materials with it. Think smaller While waste-water systems in large cities are often effective, they are also very expensive to construct and costly to maintain and operate. This ...
Also found in: [+]
Why Our Global Water Crisis Needs A Moonshot 22.3.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Zenia Tata, Executive Director, Global Expansion, XPRIZE On World Water Day, we are served a powerful reminder that water is life. Water is the universal link between human survival, our climate system and sustainable global development. But a quick search on Google with the question, “Will earth ever run out of water?” will spring up an optimistic ‘never’ in a matter of milliseconds. A check of the facts illustrates that planet Earth is covered with 71% water and the amount of water will always remain the same, merely changing its form over time. However, according to The United Nations World Water Development Report 2016 , the world could face a 40% global water deficit by 2030. I know we can change that with Moonshot Thinking. Bridging the gap to ensure water abundance for all, lies first and foremost in knowing how much water is available and in what form. The earth’s water systems currently face three overarching challenges that contribute to water scarcity: lack of availability, uneven ...
Also found in: [+]
Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse: study identifies options to sustain ranching and help wildlife 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.
Also found in: [+]
"Super sponge" promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a spongethat can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds. Thanks to the application of nanotechnology, the team developed a sponge with outstanding mercury adsorption properties where mercury contaminations can be removed from tap, lake and industrial wastewater to below detectable limits in less than 5 seconds (or around 5 minutes for industrial wastewater). The sponge converts the contamination into a non-toxic complex so it can be disposed of in a landfill after use. The sponge also kills bacterial and fungal microbes.
Also found in: [+]
Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbours from birthing planets 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.
Also found in: [+]
Metro rider pulls out knife on a train at Anacostia stop on Green Line, officials say 22.3.2017 Washington Post
Metro rider pulls out knife on a train at Anacostia stop on Green Line, officials say
Also found in: [+]
Love Canned Tuna? More Grocers Want To Make Sure It Was Caught Responsibly 22.3.2017 NPR News
Whole Foods this month became the latest retailer to adopt a policy to ensure the canned tuna it sells is caught with methods that don't decimate fish stocks or trap other animals.
Also found in: [+]
The recovery, then sudden demise of 'Piggy Bank,' the sea turtle that swallowed 11 pounds of coins 22.3.2017 Washington Post
The recovery, then sudden demise of 'Piggy Bank,' the sea turtle that swallowed 11 pounds of coins
Your relationship with fish is about to change 22.3.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
A wave of change is upending the seafood business as we know it. Here’s what it means for everyone from investors to fish stick aficionados.
Also found in: [+]
A new, gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Yale scientists have developed an ultra-thin coating material that has the potential to extend the life and improve the efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries, one of the most promising areas of energy research today.In a study published online March 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe the new material — a dendrimer-graphene oxide composite film — which can be applied to any sulfur cathode. A cathode is the positive terminal on a battery.
Also found in: [+]
Futuristic Clock Prepared for Space 22.3.2017 Environmental News Network
No one keeps time quite like NASA.Last month, the space agency's next-generation atomic clock was joined to the spacecraft that will take it into orbit in late 2017.That instrument, the Deep Space Atomic Clock was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. On Feb. 17, JPL engineers monitored integration of the clock on to the Surrey Orbital Test Bed spacecraft at Surrey Satellite Technology in Englewood, Colorado.
Also found in: [+]
Sustainable Mineral Supply 21.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
International research team warns of mineral supply constraints as demand increases for green technologiesAn international team of researchers, led by the University of Delaware’s Saleem Ali, says global resource governance and sharing of geoscience data is needed to address challenges facing future mineral supply.Specifically of concern are a range of technology minerals, which are an essential ingredient in everything from laptops and cell phones to hybrid or electric cars to solar panels and copper wiring for homes. However, base metals like copper are also a matter of immense concern.
Also found in: [+]
"Flying saucer" quantum dots hold secret to brighter, better lasers 21.3.2017 Environmental News Network
A research team led by University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering ‘squashes’ the shape of nanoparticles, enabling inexpensive lasers that emit light in a customized rainbow of colours
Also found in: [+]
A path to prosperity that we can all embrace 21.3.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Tom Murray Prosperity. We all want to attain it, yet the ways we each define it are as different as we are. As President Trump charges through his first 100 days, there is a risky theme being pushed that a prosperous America comes with a choice between environmental protection and economic growth. This concept is not only false, but dangerous and short sighted. Just look at China. When I was there last year, I saw a country that, during its own industrial revolution, made decisions that had unfortunately sacrificed the environment for a short-term surge in economic prosperity. Those tradeoffs were made during a time when coal and oil provided over 90% of energy consumption, and as a result, air quality reached unhealthy standards. Now China, the world’s fastest-growing economy ( IMF ), is sprinting to play catch-up. In 2015, in fact, China invested $102.9 billion in renewables, making it the world’s largest investor in clean energy (the US, by contrast, invested $44.1 billion that same year). ( ...
Also found in: [+]
Green activists deny attacking Dakota Access pipeline 21.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bismarck, N.D. • Environmental activists who tried to disrupt some oil pipeline operations in four states last year to protest the Dakota Access pipeline said Tuesday that they aren’t responsible for any recent attacks on that pipeline. The remarks came in response to allegations that Texas-based Dakota Access developer Energy Transfer Partners made in court documents late Monday. The company said there have been “recent coordinated physical attacks along the pipeline that pose threats to life, ...
Also found in: [+]
The Thai Turtle That Ate Hundreds Of Coins Has Died 21.3.2017 NPR News
The green sea turtle drew international sympathy when it emerged that she had consumed nearly 1,000 coins that had been thrown into her pool. She died despite two emergency surgeries.
1 to 20 of 87,583