User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environment
Last updated: Aug 18 2017 05:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Galicia’s wild horse roundup runs headlong into modernity 18.8.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

Since medieval times, the people of Galicia have ritually rounded up the horses that roam wild in the green forests and hills of northwestern Spain. But like many traditions, the roundup is colliding with modern sensibilities.
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Satellites Show Hurricane Gert Being Affected by Wind Shear 18.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
NASA’s Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided an infrared and visible look at Atlantic Hurricane Gert. Both images showed the storm was being affected by wind shear and had become elongated.  
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Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversion 18.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
With more than two dozen companies in Pennsylvania manufacturing potato chips, it is no wonder that researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel approach to more efficiently convert potato waste into ethanol. This process may lead to reduced production costs for biofuel in the future and add extra value for chip makers.
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Discovery could lead to new catalyst design to reduce nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust 18.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Researchers have discovered a new reaction mechanism that could be used to improve catalyst designs for pollution-control systems to further reduce emissions of smog-causing nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust.
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NASA Sees Potential Tropical Depression 9 Form East of Lesser Antilles 18.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
NOAA's GOES-East Satellite spotted potential Tropical Depression 9 organizing east of the Lesser Antilles.At 10:45 a.m. EDT (1445 UTC) on Aug. 13 NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of potential Tropical Depression 9. The satellite imagery showed the circulation of the low pressure area was becoming better defined and that a cluster of strong convection has formed west of the center.NOAA manages the GOES series of satellites, and NASA uses the satellite data to create images and animations. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
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Jay Gruden rules out four players for Saturday's game; Doctson a game-time decision 18.8.2017 Washington Post
Jay Gruden rules out four players for Saturday's game; Doctson a game-time decision
Poisonings went hand in hand with the drinking water in Pompeii 17.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The ancient Romans were famous for their advanced water supply. But the drinking water in the pipelines was probably poisoned on a scale that may have led to daily problems with vomiting, diarrhoea, and liver and kidney damage. This is the finding of analyses of water pipe from Pompeii.- The concentrations were high and were definitely problematic for the ancient Romans. Their drinking water must have been decidedly hazardous to health.
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NASA's Rocket to Nowhere Finally Has a Destination 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
On a Thursday afternoon in June, a 17-foot-tall rocket motor—looking like something a dedicated amateur might fire off—stood fire-side-up on the salty desert of Promontory, Utah. Over the loudspeakers, an announcer counted down. And with the command to fire, quad cones of flame flew from the four inverted nozzles and grew toward the sky. As the smoke rose, it cast a four-leaf clover of shadow across the ground.
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Changing Tides: Lake Michigan Could Best Support Lake Trout and Steelhead 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Invasive mussels and less nutrients from tributaries have altered the Lake Michigan ecosystem making it more conducive to the stocking of lake trout and steelhead than Chinook salmon, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey and Michigan State University study.Reduced stocking of Chinook salmon, however, would still support a substantial population of this highly desirable recreational salmon species, which is a large contributor to the Great Lakes multi-billion-dollar recreational fishery.“Findings from our study can help managers determine the most viable ways to enhance valuable recreational fisheries in Lake Michigan, especially when the open waters of the lake are declining in productivity,” said Yu-Chun Kao, an MSU post-doctoral scientist and the lead author of the report.
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How My Little Community Garden Plot Went From Flop To Flourish 17.8.2017 NPR News
Two years ago, Carolyn Beans — plant biologist, flower farm worker and daughter of a veggie-grower — thought she had what it took to coax a bounty out of her tiny urban garden. She was wrong.
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What is climate gentrification? 17.8.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Building greener cities that boost social equity is a priority from coast to coast. But beware of urban resiliency as a 'land grab.'
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In the complex world of sustainability, taxes are still certain 17.8.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Countries remaining in the Paris accord may impose energy taxes on U.S.-refined products, which could create a new tracking and reporting nightmare.
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Researchers search for clues to toxic algae blooms 17.8.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
It's the dog days of summer in Minnesota, which means warm lakes and an uptick in reports of toxic blooms of algae across the state. Scientists are working to identify what triggers the algae.
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America's Got Talent, but Not Nearly Enough 17.8.2017 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
Trump is right to back skills-based immigration. But fewer green cards would defeat the purpose.
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Print No Evil: Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing 17.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing, is replacing conventional fabrication processes in critical areas ranging from aerospace components to medical implants. But because the process relies on software to control the 3-D printer, additive manufacturing could become a target for malicious attacks – as well as for unscrupulous operators who may cut corners.
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Police find baby near body of North Carolina woman 17.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

GREEN SEA, S.C. (AP) — Authorities in South Carolina have rescued a baby who was found inside a parked car which also contained a dead woman. Horry County Deputy Coroner Tony Henrick says 31-year-old Latosha Lewis of Tabor City, North Carolina, was pronounced dead early Tuesday near an intersection in Green Sea, a community near […]
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Habitat destruction and poaching is threatening the Sungazer 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The Sungazer (Smaug giganteus), a dragon-like lizard species endemic to the Highveld regions of South Africa, is facing an assault on two fronts as farming and industrialisation encroaches on its natural habitat – which already consist of only a several hundred square kilometres globally – while the illegal global pet trade is adding pressure on pushing the species into extinction.
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Seafood for Thought 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The world’s oceans possess vast, untapped potential for sustainable aquaculture, say UCSB marine scientists.
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Turning pollen into a low-cost fertilizer 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
As the world population continues to balloon, agricultural experts puzzle over how farms will produce enough food to keep up with demand. One tactic involves boosting crop yields. Toward that end, scientists have developed a method to make a low-cost, biocompatible fertilizer with carbon dots derived from rapeseed pollen. The study, appearing in ACS Omega, found that applying the carbon dots to hydroponically cultivated lettuce promoted its growth by 50 percent.
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Urban floods intensifying, countryside drying up 16.8.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
A global analysis of rainfall and rivers by UNSW engineers has discovered a growing pattern of intense flooding in urban areas coupled with drier soils in rural and farming areas.
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