User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Apr 23 2014 07:06 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,869    
In Syria, U.N. agency distributes most food in government-held areas 23.4.2014 L.A. Times - World News
The World Food Program needs Syrian government permission to cross into rebel territory. Safety is also a major concern.

The World Food Program gives out most of its food aid to Syria in government-held areas, with only a quarter of the distributions occurring in rebel-controlled territory, according to latest figures from the U.N. agency.
Also found in: [+]
Why Latinos Are Disproportionately Affected by Asthma, and What We Can Do 22.4.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
This post was co-authored by Lucía Oliva Hen­nelly, EDF's Tom Graff Diversity fellow,  Rachel Shaffer , EDF's Research Assistant, and Declan Kingland, National Health Programs Coordinator for the League of United Latin American Citizens. Source: iStockphoto.com Today in the United States, Latinos are three times more likely to die from asthma than other racial or ethnic groups. Latino children are 40 percent more likely to die from asthma than non-Latino whites, and nearly 1 in 10 Latino children under the age of 18 suffer from this chronic respiratory illness. Addressing the dangerous indoor and outdoor air pollution that is linked to asthma is critical for the health of Latino communities – and for all Americans. Socio-economics Latinos are one of the poorest demographics in the United States, with roughly 1 in 4 Latinos living under the poverty level. Many Latinos also face challenges due to limited English-language proficiency, and in some cases, low levels of education. These issues can lead ...
Also found in: [+]
Bon Jovi helps open low-income housing in Philly 22.4.2014 Philly.com News
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Rock star Jon Bon Jovi is showing some brotherly love to the less fortunate in Philadelphia.
Also found in: [+]
Why Latinos are disproportionately affected by asthma — and what we can do 22.4.2014 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
(This post first appeared on EDF Voices. Para leer en Español haga clic aquí) This post was co-authored by Rachel Shaffer  and Declan Kingland, National Health Programs Coordinator for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). Today in the United States, Latinos are three times more likely to die from asthma than other racial or ethnic groups. […]
Also found in: [+]
Bon Jovi helps open low-income housing in Philly 22.4.2014 Entertainment
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Rock star Jon Bon Jovi is showing some brotherly love to the less fortunate in Philadelphia.
Also found in: [+]
Why Latinos are disproportionately affected by asthma …and what we can do 22.4.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Para leer en Español  haga clic aquí This post was co-authored by Rachel Shaffer  and Declan Kingland, National Health Programs Coordinator for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). Today in the United States, Latinos are three times more likely to die from asthma than other racial or ethnic groups. Latino children are 40 percent more likely to die from asthma than non-Latino whites, and nearly 1 in 10 Latino children under the age of 18 suffer from this chronic respiratory illness. Addressing the dangerous indoor and outdoor air pollution that is linked to asthma is critical for the health of Latino communities – and for all Americans. Socioeconomics Latinos are one of the poorest demographics in the United States, with roughly 1 in 4 Latinos living under the poverty level. Many Latinos also face challenges due to limited English-language proficiency, and in some cases, low levels of education. These issues can lead Latinos, particularly new immigrants, to low-paying jobs, often in the ...
Also found in: [+]
How Big Data Could Undo Our Civil-Rights Laws 22.4.2014 American Prospect
Big Data will eradicate extreme world poverty by 2028, according to Bono , front man for the band U2. But it also allows unscrupulous marketers and financial institutions to prey on the poor . Big Data, collected from the neonatal monitors of premature babies , can detect subtle warning signs of infection, allowing doctors to intervene earlier and save lives. But it can also help a big-box store identify a pregnant teenager —and carelessly inform her parents by sending coupons for baby items to her home. News-mining algorithms might have been able to predict the Arab Spring . But Big Data was certainly used to spy on American Muslims when the New York City Police Department collected license plate numbers of cars parked near mosques, and aimed surveillance cameras at Arab-American community and religious institutions. Until recently, debate about the role of metadata and algorithms in American politics focused narrowly on consumer privacy protections and Edward Snowden’s revelations about the National ...
Also found in: [+]
Are Stores Making Bank Off Food Stamps? 22.4.2014 Mother Jones
How much of Walmart's revenue comes from its shoppers' food stamps? The store isn't required to say. But a January Court of Appeals ruling could change that. If the unanimous decision by the 8th Circuit's panel of three judges holds, the United States Department of Agriculture will be required to release data indicating exactly how much of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program's $80 billion in annual sales is paid to specific retailers and individual stores. The Argus Leader, a Sioux Falls, South Dakota, paper, brought suit against the USDA in 2011 after the agency denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request seeking data on USDA's annual payments to grocers, gas stations, and other retailers in the SNAP program. The USDA routinely tracks the payments, which retailers process as they do credit cards: The stores accept recipients' Electronic Benefits Transfer cards as payment, and in turn the government pays the stores. Stephanie Bengford, the US attorney representing the USDA, argued that ...
Also found in: [+]
How Recycling Will Help The World's Poor Earn Money, Access To 3-D Printers, More 22.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Two Canadian entrepreneurs may have discovered a way to simultaneously tackle the issues of poverty and plastic pollution. Shaun Frankson and David Katz, from Victoria, British Columbia, have started a company called The Plastic Bank which aims to capitalize on man power to help clean up the planet , Mother Nature Network reported. David Katz, president of The Plastic Bank, says that pound for pound, plastic is more valuable than steel . The issue, however, is finding a way to sort the plastic for recycling. In 2012, 32 million tons of plastic waste were produced, and just 9 percent of that figure was collected for recycling, according to the EPA. The Plastic Bank plans to mobilize the world's poor to help sort plastic, and in return will offer them food, clothing, tools and even access to 3-D printer services so they can manufacture things they need. " Almost half the world's population lives in poverty , so really half the world is being underutilized," co-founder Shaun Frankson told CHEK News. "And ...
Also found in: [+]
6 Reasons to Think About Clean Water On Earth Day 22.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today the United States celebrates Earth Day to support environmental protection and to praise recent efforts made for environmental preservation. Water and environmental sustainability go hand-in-hand, so I thought I'd use today to (a) celebrate some of the amazing progress we've made in providing clean water to Earthlings and (b) to highlight some of the most pressing work left to do! First, the good news: 1. Over the past 30 years, the amount of water Americans use at home has remained constant, despite a steady population increase. Even with increased demand for food (agriculture, livestock, irrigation, etc.) Americans have been able to develop new habits and new tech to use water more intelligently. 2. In 2012 we met the Millennium Development Goal for water, reducing by half the amount of people worldwide without access to a safe, reliable source of clean water. Between 1990 and 2010, over two billion people achieved access for the first time. 3. Finally, technology is democratizing the hard work ...
Also found in: [+]
Worth of housing along Central Corridor rail line debated 21.4.2014 Twincities.com: News

Light-rail projects such as the Central Corridor or its future extension, the Southwest Line, are touted by officials as ways to connect low-income workers and residents of affordable housing to jobs throughout the metro.

Also found in: [+]
For LGBT seniors, affordable housing is scarce and often unwelcoming 20.4.2014 LA Times: Top News
Also found in: [+]
GOP Seeks to Erase 'War on Women' Label 19.4.2014 Wall St. Journal: Policy
Wary of being on the losing side of the gender gap, Republican candidates are working to repel Democratic efforts to portray GOP policy on abortion, equal-pay laws and other matters as harmful to women.
Also found in: [+]
North Dakota, Minnesota have lowest 'food insecurity' rates in nation 18.4.2014 Twincities.com: Local

FARGO -- North Dakota is keeping its low-income residents better fed than other states, according to a national hunger relief charity.

Also found in: [+]
Safeguarding Our Water Supplies 18.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There is a saying the Southwest: "El agua es vida." Water is life. A proposed new rule from President Obama's Administration would safeguard our water supplies -- benefiting our families, environment and local economies. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have opened a 90-day comment period on a proposed a rule, "Waters of the U.S.," which protects the nation's rain-dependent streams and wetlands from pollution under the Clean Water Act. These streams are the headwaters of drinking water supplies for 1 in 3 Americans, and provide wildlife habitat and outdoor recreational opportunities for all of us. Greater protections for our nation's water supplies will help address some of the larger health issues that affect the Hispanic community as a whole. Obviously, clean drinking water is essential for everyone, but Hispanics face disproportionate health hazards largely due to poor environmental health. Access to clean water is an issue of equity. Latinos are 165 ...
Also found in: [+]
Will Health Coverage Translate Into Getting Health Care? 17.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
More than 7.5 million people have signed up for new health coverage through the Affordable Care Act's state and federal health insurance marketplaces at the close of the first enrollment period. The Department of Health and Human Services reports that another 3 million people have gained health coverage through Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) as of the end of February, compared to figures five months earlier. Now we're about to find out something critically important: whether having health coverage translates into receiving health care. Let's be blunt: one of the biggest problems with America's health care system is that it neglects the poorest among us. People of color suffer more and die earlier than others . The U.S. continues to have one of the highest infant mortality rates among the 14 wealthiest countries, and it's higher in communities of color. The reasons for this disproportionate suffering and dying in communities of color are rooted in economic inequality and ...
Also found in: [+]
The War on Drugs 17.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Although Richard Nixon declared war on drugs in 1971, we must look to an economic and historic analysis of anti-drug laws in the U.S. to put the "war" into context. In the late 18th and well into the 19th century, before the drug-conviction craze, the issue of addiction was dealt with as a public-health issue and not as a criminal one. Addicts received help through treatment and were seen as deserving of empathy -- or, at the very least, understanding and sympathy -- instead of punishment. At the start of the 20th century, the introduction of drug-prohibition laws seemed almost undeniably linked with ethnic minorities: Asians were associated with opium or heroin; Latinos were tied to hemp or marijuana; and later, African Americans were linked to crack cocaine while low-income whites were associated with methamphetamine. But whatever the new drug of choice was at the moment, the propaganda and rhetoric stayed the same. When exclusionary government programs (e.g., the Federal Housing Administration of the ...
Also found in: [+]
Access To Clean Water One Bag At A Time 17.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Water. It is our most precious resource, and when disaster strikes, the lack of clean drinking water poses serious health threats in communities worldwide. At the Fifth Annual Women in the World Summit held this past week, I had the opportunity to speak with one of the Toyota Mothers of Invention, Tricia Compas-Markman, founder of a company that develops innovative solutions for disaster relief and addresses the vital global need for clean water. Below is a bit of my conversation with Tricia from DayOne Response about the need to develop resources to treat and clean water following a disaster. Me: So what is the water bag and how does it work? Tricia Compas-Markman (TC): So this is the water bag. So it's a bladder system that holds 10 liters of water, and really what it does is it allows you to treat water all in a single system. So you collect water from a stream, river, creek... Me: No matter how muddy it is? TC: No matter how muddy, so up to really nasty conditions, wastewater-like conditions... Me: ...
Also found in: [+]
HUFFPOST HILL - GOP Bravely Defends America From Counting 16.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Vance McAllister owns an event production company, so maybe he can earn a little extra dough organizing his own ethics hearing. The only redeeming thing about Mary Landrieu reenacting a committee hearing for a campaign ad is that she didn't wear a flight suit while doing so. And Americans believe women are unfairly paid less but don't think legislation will fix the disparity, so we're assuming Americans want more poorly-filmed anti-harassment workplace videos from the 1980s? This is HUFFPOST HILL for Tuesday, April 15th, 2014: GOP HATING ON THE CENSUS AGAIN - This time it's more paranoid than it is outright stupid . Mike McAuliff: "Republicans who have tried for years to hamstring detailed surveys by the U.S. Census Bureau were suddenly alarmed Tuesday over news that changes to one of its surveys might in turn hamstring one of their political strategies -- attacks against Obamacare. The changes, reported by The New York Times, will alter the questions asked about Americans' health insurance coverage, ...
Also found in: [+]
A Kale of Two Cities: Cultivating Social Justice 14.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Locavoracious appetites and a back-to-the-land ethos have raised bespoke urban farming to the status of high fashion -- especially if the land sits atop an industrial building in one of Brooklyn's hipster havens. To many, growing food in the city is an exercise for gourmands, measured by the distance heirloom tomatoes, artisanal honey, and free-range eggs travel from farm to plate. Urban agriculture pioneers have repurposed vacant land, greened the city, created community space, and introduced city dwellers to fresh local food. Terroir is now measured by block and lot number. But this is not the whole story. In fact, as practiced in farms and gardens in New York and elsewhere, urban agriculture is as much about social justice as it is about the quality or proximity of produce. For some farmers and gardeners, particularly those in low-income neighborhoods -- where a bag of chips can be easier to come by than fresh vegetables, and diet-related illnesses are often rampant -- urban agriculture is a means to ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,869