User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Oct 22 2014 23:00 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The New Farmers 22.10.2014 Orion Magazine Articles
Young people are flocking to farming as a meaningful and rewarding vocation.
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Water Shutoffs Robbing Detroit Residents of 'Dignified' Life: UN Investigators 21.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Transit and residential neighborhoods: Questioning the affordability of residential neighborhoods around Metro Rail stations, a Delhi case study 21.10.2014 THE CITY FIX
Large-scale mass transit projects such as the Delhi Metro Rail often lead to transit-oriented development (TOD) that can enhance quality of life, but also compromise housing affordability. Planning authorities in urban areas around the world have acknowledged the need for ...
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Technology and Inequality 21.10.2014 Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories

The disparity between the rich and everyone else is larger than ever in the United States and increasing in much of Europe. Why?

The signs of the gap—really, a chasm—between the poor and the super-rich are hard to miss in Silicon Valley. On a bustling morning in downtown Palo Alto, the center of today’s technology boom, apparently homeless people and their meager belongings occupy almost every available public bench. Twenty minutes away in San Jose, the largest city in the Valley, a camp of homeless people known as the Jungle—reputed to be the largest in the country—has taken root along a creek within walking distance of Adobe’s headquarters and the gleaming, ultramodern city hall.

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Everyone in Detroit Should Have Access To Clean Water 20.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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What to know about federally run Indian schools 18.10.2014 Yahoo: Politics
WINSLOW, Ariz. (AP) — The federal government finances 183 schools and dormitories for Native American children on or near reservations in 23 states. The schools are some of the nation's lowest ...
Mayoral candidates wave promises across D.C. 18.10.2014 Washington Post: Op-Eds
“I’d rather give up than give in to this So promise me only one thing, would you? Just don’t ever make me promises, No ...
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Small Scale Food Producers are the Solution to the Global Food Crisis 16.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Hungry being squeezed by climate change, rising commodity costs and land exploitation 14.10.2014 Press releases

Hungry being squeezed by climate change, rising commodity costs and land exploitation

Rising food costs, climate change and dramatic changes in land tenure are increasing the reality of hunger and leaving food-insecure people feeling they “are rated as the cheapest of the cheapest”.

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Public Transit: The Road to Opportunity 14.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I remember years ago, while living in Los Angeles, abandoning a trip to a job interview when after two hours of travel and five bus changes I still was not at the job site. I realized that if I got the job, I could not manage a daily two-hour commute. Serious public transportation challenges are hurting the nation's economy. Qualified workers are not able to get to jobs they could do; would-be workers are not connecting to training; job efficiency is compromised because of lateness, missed work days, and transportation related-distractions due to unreliable, unaffordable and unsafe public transit. Transportation challenges exist in too many locations across the United States. Sadly, for too many residents of these communities, not enough change has come. One of the reasons for this is that transportation dollars in the federal budget are too frequently focused on highways. Public transit has been relegated to a backseat for far too long. But national and local advocates have been insistently pressing ...
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The Food Movement Dilemma: Affordable to All 14.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Heidi Legg There is something a foot in the food movement beyond locally sourced goat cheese and CSA shares being snapped up by eager families in America looking for real food. Some who have long been championing these small batch producers are focussing on how we solve the large web of food production for everyone. The Food Project based in Lincoln and Boston, Massachusetts has been focussed on growing food in the inner city and educating inner city kids on how to farm for almost 25 years. They are now running a Winter and Summer institute to teach other people around the country how community voice in food production can make a serious impact. When I sat down with Sutton Kiplinger, Greater Boston Regional Director of The Food Project, she narrowed in on the challenge for the food movement. "How do you build a system in which farms can thrive and low-income consumers can get what they need? That's the nut that nobody's been able to crack but we're working on it." What is the Boston Food Project's ...
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The Making of Ferguson 13.10.2014 American Prospect
This article is from the Fall 2014 issue of The American Prospect magazine. OCTOBER 15, 2014 In 1968, Larman Williams was one of the first African Americans to buy a home in the white suburb of Ferguson, Missouri. It wasn’t easy; when he first went to see the house, the real estate agent wouldn’t show it to him. Atypically, Williams belonged to a church with a white pastor, who contacted the agent on Williams’s behalf, only to be told that neighbors objected to sales to Negroes. But after the pastor then gathered the owner and his neighbors for a prayer meeting, the owner told the agent he was no longer opposed to a black buyer. Williams had been living in the St. Louis ghetto and worked as an assistant school principal in Wellston, a black St. Louis suburb. His wife, Geraldine, taught in a state special education school. They could afford to live in middle-class Ferguson, and hoped to protect their three daughters from the violence of their St. Louis neighborhood. The girls would also get better ...
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Drucker Nonprofit Innovation Awards spotlight social ventures 13.10.2014 GreenBiz.com

These 10 game-changers are rewriting the rules, proving that "the best way to predict the future is to create it."

Drucker Nonprofit Innovation Awards spotlight social ventures
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Hidden Hunger Strips Away Dignity, Perpetuates Inequality and Destroys South Africans’ Potential to Prosper 13.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Sauk Rapids-Rice school district aims to equalize opportunities as low-income population grows 13.10.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
Hidden hunger strips away dignity, perpetuates inequality and destroys South Africans’ potential to prosper 13.10.2014 Press releases

Hidden hunger strips away dignity, perpetuates inequality and destroys South Africans’ potential to prosper

One in four people in South Africa do not have enough to eat, and half the population is at risk of hunger, despite the country producing more than enough food.

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Program will connect homeless with housing | Rental Resource 11.10.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
A King County program aims to provide homeless people with short-term rental assistance, as well as access to services that are critical to stabilizing their lives.
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Obama officially designates San Gabriel Mountains a national monument 11.10.2014 LA Times: Top News
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Obama Preserves San Gabriel Mountains in LA's Backyard 10.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
America grew richer in natural heritage today. President Obama is declaring Los Angeles' San Gabriel Mountains a national monument, ensuring this beautiful landscape will remain wild for generations to come. Now the 17 million people living in Greater Los Angeles -- and the many who visit every year -- will always be able to leave behind the crush of urban life and experience the natural wonder of the San Gabriels. They will be rewarded with quiet stillness and breathtaking views. This landscape is home to mature forests and dramatic waterfalls. Visitors can spot bighorn sheep, spotted owls, and other rare species. And history buffs can learn about the Old Spanish National Historic Trail, Native Americans, rock art, and other cultural sites. Local residents are eager to have greater access to these places. Los Angeles County is one of the most park-poor urban areas in the nation, and the San Gabriel Valley -- stretching from Pasadena to Pomona -- is especially starved for open space. It has a rich array ...
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Detroit Faces “Humanitarian Crisis” as City Shuts Off Water Access for Thousands of Residents 10.10.2014 Democracy Now!
We are on the road in Detroit, broadcasting from the “Great Lakes State” of Michigan, which has one of the longest freshwater coastlines in the country. But its residents are increasingly concerned about their access to affordable water. A judge overseeing Detroit’s bankruptcy recently ruled the city can continue shutting off water to residents who have fallen behind on payments after a judge concluded there is no "enforceable right" to water. The city began cutting off water to thousands of households several months ago, prompting protests from residents and the United Nations. Today, some 350 to 400 customers reportedly continue to lose water service daily in Detroit, where poverty rate is approximately 40 percent, and people have seen their water bills increase by 119 percent within the last decade. Most of the residents are African-American. Two-thirds of those impacted by the water shutoffs involve families with children. We speak with Alice Jennings, the lead attorney for residents who have lost ...
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