User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Apr 21 2017 15:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Saving the Planet Goes Local 21.4.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Of all the Trump administration’s policies, the one most likely to cause damage that can’t be undone may not be deporting immigrants or throwing poor people off Medicaid or outsourcing our foreign policy to the Kremlin. Rather, it could well be a cessation of efforts to combat climate change. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is cumulative; even a later reversal of the Trump administration’s fossil fuel–friendly policies would not be able to undo the damage about to be done. Even by the environmentally retrograde standards of his party, Donald Trump stands out as an extreme climate-science denier: Cold winter weather in New York prompts him to tweet that global warming has been proven a hoax. He hates wind farms (partly because they threaten the views from one of his Scottish golf resorts). On the campaign trail, Trump vowed to repeal President Obama’s pro-climate regulations and all ...
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Climate Change As Genocide: Inaction Equals Annihilation 20.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com . Not since World War II have more human beings been at risk from disease and starvation than at this very moment. On March 10th, Stephen O’Brien, under Secretary-General of the United Nations for humanitarian affairs, informed the Security Council that 20 million people in three African countries ― Nigeria, Somalia, and South Sudan ― as well as in Yemen were likely to die if not provided with emergency food and medical aid. “We are at a critical point in history,” he declared . “Already at the beginning of the year we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the U.N.”  Without coordinated international action, he added, “people will simply starve to death [or] suffer and die from disease.” Major famines have, of course, occurred before, but never in memory on such a scale in four places simultaneously. According to O’Brien, 7.3 million people are at risk in Yemen, 5.1 million in the Lake Chad area of northeastern Nigeria, 5 million in South ...
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How D.C. Became the Darling of Education Reform 20.4.2017 American Prospect
When it comes to education reform, perhaps no city has inspired more controversy and acclaim over the last decade than Washington, D.C. Even today, uttering the name “Michelle Rhee”—the city’s first schools chancellor appointed in 2007 after a major shakeup in the district—still evokes heated reactions from local residents. Following the dissolution of the local school board and the centralization of education decision-making within the mayor’s office, then-Mayor Adrian Fenty commanded an unusual amount of power to change D.C.’s schools. Over the past ten years, the policies undergirding the national education reform movement—offering more school choice, weakening teacher union power, and creating new accountability systems (with incentives like pay-for-performance and teacher evaluations based partly on student test scores)—have taken hold in the nation’s capital. Some see these moves as encouraging proof that education reform is working. Proponents point to positive benchmarks: District enrollment is ...
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The locations public transit can take you — and those who get left behind 17.4.2017 Washington Post
Several wealthy neighborhoods have easy access to and from the District, but many lower-income areas are more difficult to reach during certain times.
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American Preparatory Academy demolishes nearby home to open emergency route through Draper neighborhood 15.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Work began Friday on a permanent driveway linking Draper’s American Preparatory Academy to a public road, advancing a long-held goal for the landlocked school. But the development is cold comfort for school administrators, who have their eyes set on reaching a different road, and for residents in Draper’s Inauguration Park neighborhood, who saw a home demolished in the name of charter expansion. “They’ve just had poor planning to begin with since they started the school,” said neighbor Tim War...
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Dakota Access firm can keep some secrets 13.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bismarck, N.D. • A federal judge is allowing the developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline to keep secret some but not all pipeline information that the company believes could be useful to vandals and terrorists. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in a ruling dated Friday that information such as spill risks at various points along the pipeline should be shielded from public view but that certain details relating to how a spill might be handled don’t warrant such protection. Two American ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Dakota Access company can keep some pipeline secrets 13.4.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A federal judge is allowing the developer of the Dakota Access oil pipeline to keep secret some but not all pipeline information that the company believes could be useful to vandals and terrorists. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in a ruling dated Friday that information such as spill risks at […]
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Mixed bag of salmon seasons set, but improved over last year’s extremely stringent restrictions 12.4.2017 Seattle Times: Local

The salmon fishing seasons for 2017-18 have been finalized with drastic cutbacks necessary on fisheries in response to meet wild fish stocks of concern, and the feelings are mixed when talking with all parties involved. “It is like buyer’s remorse (with a new car) as you look out in the driveway and felt like you didn’t get the […]
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Forget food deserts. We need to talk about food mirages. 11.4.2017 TreeHugger
Conversations about food security need to go beyond physical access to include affordability.
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Trump pushes historic cuts in global health aid, stoking fears of new disease outbreaks and diminished U.S. clout 10.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Half a century after the United States led a global expansion of international efforts to combat infectious disease and promote family planning, the Trump administration has embarked on a historic retrenchment that many fear threatens the health of millions and jeopardizes America’s standing in...

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Hawaii LGBT couples seek equal access to fertility treatment 9.4.2017 AP National
HONOLULU (AP) -- Sean Smith and his husband paid more than $20,000 for a fertility procedure when they decided to have a child using a surrogate mother. They did not know at the time that if they were a heterosexual couple, they might have saved that money....
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Hawaii LGBT couples seek equal access to fertility treatment 9.4.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

HONOLULU (AP) — Sean Smith and his husband paid more than $20,000 for a fertility procedure when they decided to have a child using a surrogate mother. They did not know at the time that if they were a heterosexual couple, they might have saved that money. Now, Smith and other members of Hawaii’s lesbian, […]
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Texas ranchers worry they'll have to give up their land to make room for Trump's wall 8.4.2017 LA Times: Nation

For 2½ centuries, Cecilia Benavides’ family has owned land on a sweeping bend of the Rio Grande.

In 1767, long before this scrubby ranchland was Texas, King Charles III of Spain granted her ancestors a large riverfront tract tangled with honey mesquite trees and towering clumps of cactus. Generations...

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Politics Friday: Protest bill, POCI and budget 7.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
It was a tense week at the Minnesota Capitol. Host Mike Mulcahy discussed the issues surrounding enhanced penalties for protests, a new DFL group that wants to work for racial equity, and the partisan gulf on the state budget.
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High country residents find partial solutions to health care costs 7.4.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Friday, April 7: Colorado’s mountain hospitals have higher net income margins Saturday, April 8: Innovation, generosity and cooperation are showing some promise for tamping down high-county health-care costs. It’s called the Valley Health Alliance, comprising employees and their families of Aspen Skiing Company, Aspen Valley Hospital, Aspen School District, the City of Aspen and Pitkin County. It is one of the many Accountable Care Organizations that have sprung up since the advent of the Affordable Care Act. The two variables of health care are cost and usage, Pitkin County Manager Jon Peacock said. Keep the employees healthier, and total costs go down, even if the per-visit costs do not. The emphasis on primary-care relationships, in which ailments and chronic conditions are spotted and treated early and efficiently, is beginning to pay dividends. By focusing on nutrition, weight loss, high blood pressure and stress, primary care doctors can stay ahead of problems that can cost thousands of dollars ...
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What we’re reading: Big gains for Oklahoma schools that offer child care, health clinics and more 6.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Schools in a high-poverty Oklahoma district have attracted national attention for pursuing new models of education. Ed Lab’s occasional feature “What We’re Reading” takes a look.
With L.A.'s skid row at a tipping point, a divisive vote on local representation 6.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Voters in Los Angeles city and county have loudly asserted their desire to conquer homelessness in recent months, approving two tax measures that will provide billions of dollars for housing and services over the next decade.

But the money can’t arrive quickly enough for skid row, which has reached...

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By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development Goals 5.4.2017 WRI Stories
By the Numbers: How Business Benefits from the Sustainable Development GoalsAdd Comment|PrintThere’s money to be made in solving the world’s sustainability problems. Global Landscapes Forum/Flickr The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have an unexpected champion—forward-thinking business leaders. The Business and Sustainable Development Commission, a group of corporate, finance and civil society leaders, recently released a report showing that achieving the SDGs in just four... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Health officials acknowledge effects of utility leak on Alabama residents 4.4.2017 LA Times: Business

A chemical leak at a natural gas facility that had long been owned by San Diego-based Sempra Energy has been found to have contributed to the troubled health of residents in a poor Alabama community.

The Alabama Department of Public Health announced in a recent press release that the ongoing review...

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Dakota Access fight provides blueprint for pipeline protests 2.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Prolonged protests have failed to stop the flow of oil, but they have provided inspiration and a blueprint for protests against pipelines in other states.
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