User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Aug 26 2016 21:14 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Black Women Do Breastfeed, Despite Intense Systemic Barriers in the US 26.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) Despite the best efforts of Black Women Do Breastfeed, Black Mothers Breastfeeding Association and others, a racial gap in breastfeeding rates persists in the US, largely owing to centuries of stigma, an absence of systemic support and lack of affirmative images of Black breastfeeding women. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) The movement to normalize breastfeeding in this country has generated positive results, but a racial gap in breastfeeding rates persists. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , 79 percent of all newborn infants in the US started out breastfeeding in 2011. That is good news for both babies and mothers, as breastfeeding yields significant health benefits, such as a lower risk of asthma and childhood leukemia for children, and a lower risk of gynecological cancers and osteoporosis for mothers. But the data suggest that US mothers require more support in order to continue breastfeeding. Among US-born children in 2011, ...
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Pen, paper, bright-red truck: Woman inspires letters written from the heart 26.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

In a truck filled with beautiful paper and pens, the Letter Farmer parks around the Seattle area and sells the art of old-fashioned communication.
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Dakota Access Pipeline Protests Recall America’s Historical Shame 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Sonali Kolhatkar

Until a few years ago, the word “occupation” was synonymous with power, imperialism and foreign invasion. Today, in the post-Occupy Wall Street era, more and more activists are using their physical presence to make demands. From Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park to Tahrir Square in Cairo, occupation has become a powerful method of organizing.

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Environmental, Tribal, Landowner Groups Urge President Obama to Repeal Permits for Dakota Access Pipeline 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Leading national and local environmental, tribal, and landowners’ rights organizations sent a letter to President Obama today expressing concern about the Army Corps of Engineers’ approval of some of the permits for the Dakota Access pipeline and urging him to direct the Corps to repeal those permits and not issue any further permits until it can be fully evaluated and held to the same standard as the Keystone XL pipeline.

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Sanders Opposes Dakota Access Pipeline 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) issued the following statement in support of grassroots and legal efforts to stop the Dakota Access pipeline, which would run from North Dakota to Illinois:  

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Spend Less, Do More: Corps Can Help Secure the Future of the National Park Service 25.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Corpsmembers with New Jersey Youth Corps of Phillipsburg restore a historic structure at Gateway National Recreation Area. The NPS site sustained extensive damage during Hurricane Sandy. Mary Ellen Sprenkel CEO, The Corps Network Today the National Park Service celebrates its 100th birthday. The National Park Service embodies the best of what it means to be American. Since its founding, it has promoted the natural and cultural beauty of this country by protecting our national treasures and making them accessible to all citizens. But after decades of use, our national parks are at a crossroads. Billions of dollars in backlogged maintenance projects threaten the accessibility of our parks. Additionally, despite changing national demographics, the average park visitor has become older and whiter. The most recent numbers show that just 22 percent of park goers are people of color. To keep our parks relevant, the National Park Service is working to solve these two issues. Without comprehensive maintenance, we ...
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Barack You Held My Grandson In Your Arms 25.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"Barack you held my grandson in your arms and felt the comfort and warmth of the baby. Let us feel the same from your kind act and words. Remember you promised to help us all." ~~M. Jay Cook Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Standing Rock Indian Reservation, Cannonball South Dakota--August clouds are stacked in three-dimensional layers over the Great Plains. Gentle slopes west of the Missouri River are interrupted by low ridges, buttes and a stray boulder here and there --all gifts left by the glaciers eons ago. A few miles south of Bismarck on the road to Cannonball, local authorities have erected another kind of stone, one not indigenous to this sacred area. Concrete barricades, capable of stopping an ISIS attack, block direct access to reservation land and more importantly, the peaceful gathering of up to 2000 (at one time) Native Americans and supporters trying to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline at the Sacred Stones Camp. It seems that if you are a writer you can talk your way through. A polite warning was ...
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Local Briefs 25.8.2016 Durango Herald
Meeting examines mental health issuesThe Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition and the Southwest Center for Independence are hosting a meeting for people in Southwest Colorado who have concerns about mental health treatment from 5:30 to...
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Judge to rule on tribe's oil pipeline request by Sept. 9 25.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Bismarck, N.D. • A ruling in the request by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to stop a four-state oil pipeline under construction near their reservation will come by Sept. 9, a federal judge said Wednesday. The tribe is challenging the Army Corps of Engineers’ decision to grant permits for Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners’ $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which crosses through four states, including near the reservation that straddles the North Dakota-South Dakota border. U.S. District Jud...
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As Court Hears Arguments in Dakota Pipeline Suit, Protesters Say 'Protect Our Water' 24.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nika Knight, staff writer

As peaceful prayer camps grow in North Dakota against the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, demonstrators in Washington, D.C. are marching and chanting in solidarity while a U.S. federal court hears arguments regarding the Standing Rock Sioux tribe's motion to halt pipeline construction.

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Occupying the prairie: Tensions rise as tribes move to block pipeline 24.8.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

A Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline calls the project a major step toward the nation’s weaning itself off foreign oil. But others view the project as an intrusion onto lands where ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried.
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Officials Pull Water Supply as Dakota Access Protest Swells in Number and Spirit 23.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

This story was updated at 1:45 PM.

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Standing Rock Sioux Chairman: Dakota Access Pipeline "Is Threatening the Lives of My Tribe" 23.8.2016 Democracy Now!
In North Dakota, indigenous activists are continuing to protest the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which they say would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River. More than a thousand indigenous activists from dozens of different tribes across the country have traveled to the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, which was launched on April 1 by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The protests have so far shut down construction along parts of the pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has also sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over its approval of the pipeline. For more, we’re joined by Dave Archambault, chairperson of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. He’s in Washington, D.C., where there is a hearing in the tribe’s lawsuit on Wednesday.
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Native Activist Winona LaDuke: Pipeline Company Enbridge Has No Right to Destroy Our Future 23.8.2016 Democracy Now!
In North Dakota, more than a thousand indigenous activists from different tribes have converged at the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, where protesters are blocking construction of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. Protesters say the pipeline would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River, which provides water not only for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, but for millions of people downstream. For more, we are joined by Winona LaDuke, Native American activist and executive director of the group Honor the Earth. She lives and works on the White Earth Reservation in northern Minnesota.
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Standing Rock Sioux Chairman: Dakota Access Pipeline "Is Threatening the Lives of My Tribe" 23.8.2016 Truthout.com
In North Dakota, indigenous activists are continuing to protest the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which they say would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River. More than a thousand indigenous activists from dozens of different tribes across the country have traveled to the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, which was launched on April 1 by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The protests have so far shut down construction along parts of the pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has also sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over its approval of the pipeline. For more, we're joined by Dave Archambault, chairperson of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. He's in Washington, D.C., where there is a hearing in the tribe's lawsuit on Wednesday. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: We turn now to look at North Dakota, where indigenous activists are continuing to protest the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which they say would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River. INDIGENOUS ACTIVISTS: Respect our ...
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Water Is Life, Oil Is Death: The People vs. the Bakken Pipeline in Iowa and the Dakotas 23.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Paul Street

The American version of democracy focuses on elections and candidates. As the venerable left intellectual Noam Chomsky observed in June, “Citizenship means every four years you put a mark somewhere and you go home and let other guys run the world.

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Forget GMOs. Pesticides Pose the Real Risk 23.8.2016 American Prospect
A tractor spreads chemicals on his crop as Hastings, Florida, resident Brian Hunt watches.    The latest statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture reveal that Americans’ appetite for locally grown, organic food is growing. Consumers want to know where their food comes from and what’s in it. Most polls show that the vast majority of Americans also support mandatory labels for genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Nearly half of Americans think scientists have found risks associated with eating GM foods even though they haven’t, according to a recent survey by the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. “People don’t know very much about the science, and they don’t know that GMOs have been in the food supply for 20 years,” says William Hallman, who ran the survey. “They just know they don’t like it.” Last month, after years of contentious debate, President Obama signed legislation requiring the first national GMO labeling standard. (Labeling advocates aren’t happy with the ...
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Welfare Reform Is 20 Years Old and It's Worse Than You Can Imagine 22.8.2016 Mother Jones
Last year, Gov. Phil Bryant of Mississippi made a decision that could disrupt the lives of nearly 84,000 of his state's poorest residents. There was no public announcement or debate. It took a critical report by advocates and a swell in media coverage to alert policy circles to what was coming. "The overall feeling was a lot of panic and stress," said Jessica Shappley, a senior policy analyst at the Jackson-based Hope Policy Institute. The two-term Republican governor had reintroduced a three-month time limit on food stamp access for "able-bodied adults without dependents," individuals between the ages of 18 and 49 who are known as "ABAWDs." After three months of receiving food aid, they would now have to prove they were working at least 20 hours a week. If they couldn't, their food stamps— averaging between $150 and $170 a month—would be cut off. The loss of that aid would disrupt the lives of many low-income Mississippians. "It's the difference between having a meal every day until the end of the month ...
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Smart PR or sustainability? Inside Target's $40 million food investment 22.8.2016 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The full effect of big-budget corporate community spending really depends on a company's business model.
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When Martin Luther King Jr. Came Up Against Chicago Racism 21.8.2016 Truthout.com
 Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, explains the backdrop to this new struggle of the civil rights movement and tells the story of a challenge to institutional racism in the United States' second-largest city during the 1960s. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. takes part in a televised panel discussion, in New York, June 30, 1963. (Photo: Allyn Baum / The New York Times) What led to the current movement insisting that Black lives do matter and demanding that Black people be treated accordingly? Find out in Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor's new book, which Michelle Alexander calls "a searching examination of the social, political and economic dimensions of the prevailing racial order." From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation also looks at what the future of the movement might hold - order the book today with a donation to Truthout! The main goals of the Southern civil rights movement included ending Jim Crow and securing the right of African Americans to vote across the ...
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