User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
1 new since Apr 20 2018 15:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 7,789    
The Continuing Quest for a More Walkable Los Angeles 20.4.2018 American Prospect
screen_shot_2017-07-19_at_4.28.52_pm.png Angelenos spend unfathomable amounts of time in cars navigating traffic jams—ones that definitely don’t turn into La La Land-style dance parties . A recent study by INRIX, a transportation analytics company, found that Los Angeles residents spend 100 hours in traffic congestion, the worst in the United States. Despite L.A.’s car-centric reputation, walking and taking public transit is the norm for many Angelenos, especially people of color. According to Los Angeles Metro, the county’s transit agency, most of its passengers are African American or Latino. Social inequality is baked into the regional land use laws characterized by low-density sprawl that has contributed to car dependence. Affluent, majority-white communities concentrated in the most desirable areas are effectively walled off by “redlining,” segregated housing policies that prevented low-income people and people of color from buying homes and living in white neighborhoods. Before World War II, L.A. ...
Also found in: [+]
In China and India, there are 70 million more men than women. Here are the consequences. 19.4.2018 Washington Post
In China and India, there are 70 million more men than women. Here are the consequences.
Also found in: [+]
The 2018 Farm Bill's Hidden Agenda to Push Millions Off Food Stamps 18.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout doesn't take corporate money and we don't shy away from confronting the root causes of injustice. Can you help sustain our work with a tax-deductible donation? Last August, on the first day of an eight state, two-installment RV tour to address poverty and prosperity in rural America for the upcoming farm bill, US Department of Agriculture Secretary George "Sonny" Perdue visited the Wisconsin State Fair.  Activities that morning included carnival rides and a listening session with farmers, which Perdue hosted alongside Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. Afterward, Perdue, Walker and their families were in search of food. Walker quipped, "We'll probably find a few things on a stick." Perdue then set out in a Class A Hurricane Thor Motor Coach (floorplans start with an MSRP value above $100,000) to meet with young farmers at a farm he called, "a feed the hunger" type farm -- in reference to the Hunger Task Force Farm south of Milwaukee. Perdue also hosted Paul Ryan in the RV later that day. They sat ...
Also found in: [+]
The View from the Bus: Better Transportation Means Better Lives 16.4.2018 WRI Stories
The View from the Bus: Better Transportation Means Better Lives Comments|Add Comment|PrintPablo Bautista and his mother, Brenda, trace their bus route. Photo by Ari Santillán/WRI México It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the big picture when it comes to cities. They’re home to more than half the global population, produce three quarters of GDP and greenhouse gas emissions, and are still growing in nearly every respect. But cities are made up of individuals, and urban policy has real, tangible... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
The View from the Bus: Better Transportation Means Better Lives 16.4.2018 THE CITY FIX
It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the big picture when it comes to cities. They’re home to more than half the global population, produce three quarters of GDP and greenhouse gas emissions, and are still growing in nearly every respect. ...
Also found in: [+]
Why Gov. Murphy's free community college plan worries some college presidents 16.4.2018 Philly.com News
Gov. Murphy wants to make community college free to everyone in New Jersey, but college presidents' responses are mixed.
Also found in: [+]
When They Couldn't Afford Internet Service, They Built Their Own 15.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Dwight Roston is drilling on the roof of a home in Detroit's Islandview neighborhood on the city's east side. Roston is part of a team that is setting up a wireless internet connection. The home is just one of 150 designated households in the city to receive free internet service by the end of the year. In 2016, a coalition of media, tech, and community organizations launched the Equitable Internet Initiative, a project that will result in the construction of wireless broadband internet networks across three underserved Detroit neighborhoods. Leading the initiative is the Detroit Community Technology Project, a digital justice project sponsored by  Allied Media Projects . Each network will provide wireless internet service to 50 households per neighborhood, according to Diana Nucera, executive director of DCTP. "During the economic and housing crisis, communities had to fend for themselves," Nucera says. "Media and technology play such a vital role in economic opportunities, but the tech industry doesn't ...
Also found in: [+]
Restoring the Promise of the Fair Housing Act 14.4.2018 Truthout.com
Truthout takes zero advertising money -- instead we rely on readers to sustain our site. Will you join the thousands of people who fund our work? Make a donation by clicking here! The Fair Housing Act, passed fifty years ago this month, was a critical victory of the Civil Rights era and an effort to address generations of systemic racism in housing policy. The law intended to prohibit discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, or sex. President Johnson signed the Act in large part to stem the tide of anger that rose in cities after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but it was regular people who won the Act, through a years-long struggle to demand fair and equal access to housing. Segregating Our Cities The Fair Housing Act was indeed a victory -- but it wasn't perfect, and didn't come close to rectifying the injustices that, by 1968, were already ingrained in American communities. Developers and planners had long embraced ...
Also found in: [+]
Autism-certified Sesame Place leads accessibility push among amusement parks, other sites 14.4.2018 Philly.com News
"This has been in the works for quite some time," said Cathy Valeriano, the president of Sesame Place. The park has always made it a point to be friendly to all visitors. Within the past year, however, its executives have worked with the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES), to gain this certification.
How Trump's Immigration Policies Harm Children 12.4.2018 Truthout.com
The Trump administration has attacked immigrant communities from day one with a range of misguided proposals and executive orders that undermine civil rights and terrify families. These efforts are having devastating effects -- right now, as well as potentially long term -- on the health and well-being of our nation's youngest residents. Documenting the Harm Two new reports  issued by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) examine how the Trump Administration's anti-immigrant rhetoric and policy priorities are wreaking havoc in the lives of young children. Through interviews with more than 100 child care and early education professionals in six states, along with focus groups with dozens of parents, CLASP found pervasive effects of these threats on children. The reports detail disturbing signs and behaviors of distress, as well as serious risks to young children's healthy development. Because of their isolation and fear, immigrant families are reluctant to seek nutrition assistance, health care, ...
Also found in: [+]
Transcript of Zuckerberg’s second day of questioning on the Hill 12.4.2018 Washington Post
Transcript of Zuckerberg’s second day of questioning on the Hill
Also found in: [+]
Reviving the Fair Housing Act at 50 11.4.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Noah Berger) Protesters outside Twitter's San Francisco headquarters on November 7, 2013. On April 11, 1968—50 years ago today—Lyndon Johnson signed the federal Fair Housing Act, which outlawed racial discrimination in the sale and rental of housing units. The act, passed in the wake of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, represented a major advance for human freedom and racial justice. While discrimination in housing remains a problem, the act enabled many middle-class African Americans to move out of segregated high-poverty neighborhoods. The black/white residential dissimilarity index (where zero is perfect integration and 100 is apartheid) declined from 79 in 1970 to 59 in 2010. The bad news, however, is that local governments have frustrated the Fair Housing Act by adopting “exclusionary zoning” laws that discriminate based on income—and disproportionately affect people of color. These ordinances limit housing to single-family homes and ban apartment buildings or other multifamily ...
Also found in: [+]
How this up-and-coming leader is improving energy equity in Illinois 10.4.2018 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
How this up-and-coming leader is improving energy equity in Illinois
Also found in: [+]
Hospitals Are Leaving Rural America. Rural Americans Are Staying Put. 9.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
This article was originally published by TalkPoverty.org. Kendra Colburn spent a decade uninsured. During those years, she worked as a carpenter near her hometown in rural Vermont, earning just enough that she didn't qualify for low-income health care, but not enough to afford health insurance on her own. While uninsured, she suffered two major work injuries that landed her in the emergency room -- once, a nail shot through three of her fingers, and another time, a piece of wood kicked back on the table saw and sliced her arm. When she was unable to pay the emergency room costs, her credit took a hit for years. Today, Colburn works on her brother's farm and is covered by Medicaid. As a manual laborer, Colburn has developed nerve damage, which flares up in her hands and wrists with overuse. "I cut back my hours to deal with it. I can't afford to not be able to use my hands," she says. "That's how I make all of my money." As a child who grew up in a farming community, Colburn says she observed that pain is ...
Also found in: [+]
How 12 experts would end inequality if they ran America 8.4.2018 Washington Post
How 12 experts would end inequality if they ran America
Also found in: [+]
Caught in Congo’s tides of war: 40,000 have crossed a lake seeking refuge 7.4.2018 Washington Post
Nearly 400,000 people have been displaced by renewed violence, according to the United Nations. More than 40,000 have crossed Lake Albert in rickety boats to Uganda, where they have been resettled in an ever-expanding refu­gee camp.
Also found in: [+]
Dakota Access pipeline developer submits spill response plan 7.4.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Standing Rock Sioux worries that cultural sites could be harmed by oil spill response efforts or by the staging of equipment at the Missouri River reservoir.
Also found in: [+]
Why New Social Movements Are Different 6.4.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/David Goldman) Protesters march at Oceti Sakowin camp, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline, in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on December 4, 2016. In mid-March, a Canadian alliance of First Nation tribes led protests in British Columbia over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. This action followed other indigenous protests in Canada and the United States over the past few years, over Keystone XL, the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, and the Bayou Bridge. One of the most widely covered of these protests, the anti-DAPL demonstrations at Standing Rock, was led by the Standing Rock Sioux, which unfolded in tandem with their lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers. Under President Obama, the Corps finally denied an easement for the construction of the pipeline. With little apparent care for the Sioux’s concerns, President Trump promptly reversed that move. But one defeat could not stop indigenous protesters. From Alaska and Canada to the ...
Also found in: [+]
A wealthy developer owns a rare plot of green in a very crowded part of L.A. What does he owe his neighbors? 6.4.2018 LA Times: Commentary

A grassy horseshoe-shaped park an acre wide in the heart of Koreatown takes up some of the hottest real estate in Los Angeles.

Pine trees tower over rocks scattered in the center of the plot, the only green space for miles along Wilshire Boulevard. Residents say it’s a much-needed respite in one...

Also found in: [+]
Data back up AP poll: Little progress on civil rights issues 4.4.2018 AP National
Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., American perceptions of progress toward racial equality remain largely divided along racial lines, a recent AP-NORC poll shows . The majority of African-Americans surveyed saw little to no progress toward equal treatment in key areas that the civil rights movement sought to address. White respondents frequently portrayed a rosier picture. A review by the Associat...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 7,789