User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Feb 23 2017 16:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Decoding the Doublespeak of FCC Chairman Pai 23.2.2017 American Prospect
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images FCC commissioner Ajit V. Pai testifies during the House Energy and Commerce Committee Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing on oversight of the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday July 10, 2012.  Michael Flynn, Kellyanne Conway, and Stephen Miller aren’t the only Donald Trump surrogates who’ve had a very bad couple of weeks. Ajit Pai, the president’s pick to lead the Federal Communications Commission, was pilloried by The  New York Times  and  Washington Post  editorial boards last week after his agency released  a rapid-fire series of rulings  in a move that resembled Trump’s  rush of executive orders . Chairman Pai’s directives, which he issued with zero public input, undermine the open internet and undercut the agency’s Lifeline program, which is designed to make the internet more affordable for families with low incomes.    Pai’s attack on Lifeline drew a swift response.  A series of letters  from  dozens of Democrats on Capitol Hill ...
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4 richest Indonesians wealthier than poorest 100 million 23.2.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A report on inequality in Indonesia says its four richest men now have more wealth than 100 million of the country’s poorest people. The report released Thursday by Oxfam said Indonesia, with a population of more than 250 million, has the sixth-worst inequality in the world. Within Asia, only Thailand is […]
‘This hasn’t been all for nothing’: Dakota pipeline protesters prepare to evacuate camp 23.2.2017 Washington Post
The standoff on a desolate North Dakota prairie over a crude-oil pipeline drew movie stars, military veterans and investment bankers to an unlikely front line. The state's attorney general warned that people who defied the Wednesday deadline to evacuate could be arrested.
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Authorities close in on Dakota Access protest camp; some activists vow to stay and fight 23.2.2017 LA Times: Nation

As authorities closed in on the Dakota Access pipeline protest Wednesday, dozens of people refused to leave the site where they’ve stood for almost a year to protest construction of the pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. 

North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum earlier this month signed an...

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Key Moments In The Dakota Access Pipeline Fight 23.2.2017 NPR News
An overview of multiple legal challenges and protests since the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers considered approving a section of the pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.
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Facing orders to leave camp, Dakota Access stalwarts brace for police crackdown 22.2.2017 Washington Post
Facing orders to leave camp, Dakota Access stalwarts brace for police crackdown
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How off-grid renewables could power Tanzania's growth 22.2.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Remote rural locations can and should be considered as potential early mover locations for clean energy.
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Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Clean Up As Deadline Looms 22.2.2017 NPR: Morning Edition
Protesters against the Dakota Access pipeline have until Wednesday to clean up and go home. Authorities want protesters off the land before the river thaws and floods the camp.
Protesters Ordered To Disband Main Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp 22.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A few hundred holdout protesters have been ordered to leave the camp they set up to battle the Dakota Access Pipeline and that captured the world’s attention for months.  The camp, Oceti Sakowin, must be cleared by 2 p.m. local time Wednesday to avoid health and safety risks, according to orders from the Army Corps of Engineers and North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum (R). Melting snows could flood the area and contaminate nearby rivers if debris and human waste at the camp aren’t hauled away, the officials have said. At its height in December, the camp on federal land near the Missouri River bustled with the presence of thousands of Native Americans, military veterans and other environmental activists resisting the construction of an oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux’s reservation. The tribe has argued that the 1,172-mile oil pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois violates their territorial rights from an 1851 treaty and that federal authorities failed to properly examine the pipeline’s environmental ...
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The Mile High Promise, And Risk, Of School Choice 20.2.2017 NPR News
Denver's innovative approach to school choice gets high marks from many parents and pundits. The program also raises questions about the limitations of choice in narrowing access and equity gaps.
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Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch is steadfast — and surprising 19.2.2017 Washington Post
The judge grew up in a high-profile Republican family and became infamous for penning fierce attacks on campus protesters at Columbia University. He has subscribed to the same judicial philosophy as the late Antonin Scalia, whom he would replace. But Gorsuch has also established deep and enduring relationships with liberals. The simple writing style of his opinions reflects his conviction that the law should be understandable to everyone.
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Investors Urge Banks To Support Rerouting Dakota Access Pipeline 18.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A group of more than 120 investors on Friday told 17 banks financing construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline that the project should be rerouted away from a Native American tribe’s reservation.  “We are concerned that if DAPL’s projected route moves forward, the result will almost certainly be an escalation of conflict and unrest as well as possible contamination of the water supply,” said the statement to banks , including Citibank and Wells Fargo, which have lent money to the companies behind the 1,172-mile oil pipeline. The group of investors includes California’s giant public employee pension fund, CalPERS; New York City teacher and firefighter pensions; dozens of religious organizations; and asset management firms. They have a combined $653 billion in managed assets, according to the statement.  The investors expressed support for the Standing Rock Sioux, who say that the oil line threatens their drinking water and violates territorial rights in North Dakota established by an 1851 treaty with the ...
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Army formally ends study of disputed pipeline crossing 17.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Army on Friday formally ended further environmental study of the Dakota Access oil pipeline’s disputed crossing beneath a Missouri River reservoir in southern North Dakota. Meanwhile, its Corps of Engineers branch continued efforts to accelerate cleanup at a protest camp near the drilling site that’s threatened by spring flooding. The […]
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Pipeline foes returning for last stand; eviction showdown looms 17.2.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

New camps are being established for demonstrators as the main camp is set for closure.
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Army formally ends study of disputed pipeline crossing 17.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Army has formally ended further environmental study of the Dakota Access oil pipeline's disputed crossing beneath a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota.
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How Will Native Tribes Fight the Dakota Access Pipeline in Court? 17.2.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux filed new motions to halt the Dakota Access pipeline's construction and operation. After a hearing on those motions, the federal judge on the case allowed construction to proceed but will be considering the tribes' claims before oil will pass through the pipeline under Lake Oahe. Protesters at the Oceti Sakowin camp face off with police, just outside the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on December 2, 2016. (Photo: Cassi Alexandra / The New York Times) On Feb. 8 the US Army Corps of Engineers reversed course and issued an  easement  allowing the installation of the Dakota Access Pipeline under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. That decision followed a  presidential memorandum  indicating that construction and operation of the pipeline would be in the "national interest," and set the stage for a final showdown over the pipeline's fate. In response, two Indian tribes, the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux, filed new motions to halt the ...
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Environmental And Health Justice Intersect for Healthy Black Futures 17.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Creating healthy Black futures requires attention and action to protect the environment in the spaces we call home. The environment greatly influences health status and outcomes, especially for communities of color where many are already overburdened by experiences of injustice that have health, social, and economic consequences. For a healthy future, we need environmental practices and health policies that strengthen our ability to be and stay healthy.    Unfortunately, the current political climate doesn’t bode well for the environment or our health. In the first two weeks of this new U.S. presidential administration alone, Trump has advocated for the Dakota Access Pipeline to move forward, lead the ongoing Republican denial of climate change, met with pro–land transfer groups who advocate selling federal land currently used for public purposes, and attempted to silence and halt the normal activities of the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies tasked with protecting and promoting ...
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PODCAST: Electrifying Africa 16.2.2017 WRI Stories
PODCAST: Electrifying AfricaAdd Comment|PrintA farmer showcases her solar power in Kenya. Photo by ILRI/Flickr Access to energy can help communities increase the productivity of their labor, earn more income, use household time more efficiently and enhance access to health, education and water. Still, 1.2 billion households today lack access to electricity connections and millions of households, businesses and community institutions receive poor and inadequate supplies of electricity... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Pipeline exec compares Dakota Access protesters to terrorists 16.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Joey Mahmoud, executive vice president of Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, is comparing pipeline opponents to terrorists.
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Pope Francis Appears To Support Standing Rock Sioux 15.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Pope Francis appeared on Wednesday to back Native Americans seeking to halt part of the Dakota Access Pipeline , saying indigenous cultures have a right to defend “their ancestral relationship to the earth”. The Latin American pope, who has often strongly defended indigenous rights since his election in 2013, made his comments on protection of native lands to representative of tribes attending the Indigenous Peoples Forum in Rome. While he did not name the pipeline, he used strong and clear language applicable to the conflict, saying development had to be reconciled with “the protection of the particular characteristics of indigenous peoples and their territories”. Francis spoke two days after a U.S. federal judge denied a request by tribes to halt construction of the final link of the project that sparked months of protests by activists aimed at stopping the 1,170-mile line. Speaking in Spanish, Francis said the need to protect native territories was “especially clear when planning economic activities ...
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