User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: May 29 2015 16:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Iran’s ‘Generation Normal’ 29.5.2015 Financial Times US
Iranian youth — curious, wired and desperate for normality — are forcing change that horrifies their rulers
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Why one D.C. doctor is prescribing walks in the park instead of pills 29.5.2015 Washington Post
Robert Zarr is walking from his Columbia Heights medical practice toward Meridian Hill Park, talking about what’s going on inside his head. If you could see his brain on an MRI, he says, far more extensive regions would be lighting up than if he were having this same conversation sitting at his desk. ¶ Zarr, a pediatrician at Unity Health Care’s Upper Cardozo Health Center, has a special interest in the unseen benefits of getting outside. He is the “physician champion” of ­DC Parks Rx, an innovative community health program committed to combating the woes of urban living by prescribing time outdoors. ¶ Zarr mentions obesity, diabetes and mental health disorders as he walks. “It only takes a couple of kids” with symptoms of ADHD to disrupt a classroom, he says, and teachers start recommending their parents talk to pediatricians about Ritalin or other medical interventions. ¶ Hence the D.C. parks prescription program. Convinced by a growing body of scientific evidence that many of the chronic scourges of ...
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Justice Department Voting Rights Proposal Could Make A Huge Difference For Native Americans 29.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Native Americans and Alaska Natives have overcome voting barriers that prevented them from casting ballots two decades after the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 and subjected them to literacy tests into the 1970s. But some still have to travel more than 100 miles to vote -- a hardship that voting rights advocates said should be addressed by the federal government. The Justice Department responded to that demand last week with a proposal to require states or counties with tribal lands to locate at least one polling place where the local tribal government wants it. The measure also would require states to provide tribal polling places with the same level of technology, including voting machines, available elsewhere in the state. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Congress should approve the changes because “significant and unnecessary barriers” still exist for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Current U.S. law doesn't specify the location of polling places, as a DOJ report noted , so it's ...
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Southland water importer OKs $350-million boost in lawn-removal rebates 27.5.2015 LA Times: Top News
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Can We Head Off a Long Hot Summer of Riots and Rebellion? 26.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The nation's attention has been focused on the recent riots in Baltimore, but the harsh truth is that they could have happened in any major city. Indeed, we could see a long hot summer of urban (and, as in places like Ferguson, suburban) riots that would make the two-day disturbances in Baltimore seem trivial in comparison. We can surely expect more turmoil next year, too, if social and economic conditions continue to deteriorate, and if candidates for president and Congress fail to make specific suggestions for addressing the suffering and hardship facing the nation. But promises can only quell riots for so long. Hope soon turns to frustration, and then anger, unless there's real action to change conditions. The turmoil in Baltimore followed the trajectory of the urban riots of the 1960s (in Detroit, Newark, Los Angeles, and 161 other cities) and subsequent civil disorders in Miami (1980), Los Angeles (1992) and elsewhere. It typically begins with an incident of police abuse against an African-American ...
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Prison sex abuse suit: A harrowing reminder 25.5.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Two women who were inmates at Rikers Island have sued New York City's Department of Corrections and one of its officers, Benny Santiago, in federal court, alleging that he and other officers raped them, infected them with sexually transmitted disease, and threatened and retaliated against them for reporting the attacks.
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Manhattan Institute Tackles the Future of Black America 23.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Recently, the Manhattan Institute convened a day-long forum, "Prospects for Black America: The Moynihan Report Turns 50." In the aftermath of Ferguson, South Carolina, and most recently Baltimore, the first panel, "Reducing Crime Rates in the Black Community," was timely. Former Maryland Governor, Bob Ehrlich, kicked off the discussion by questioning the presence of fathers and the lack of realistic sentencing guidelines. He argued that Baltimore's problems are the result of failed policies. For Ehlrich, funneling more money into inner cities is not the answer. This view is supported by a recent report in the Washington Free Beacon, which analyzed $1.8 million in stimulus funds received by the City of Baltimore. Apparently, the city received $467.1 million to invest in education and $26.5 million for crime prevention. The question is, "Where did all of that money go?" Heather MacDonald, with the Manhattan Institute, believes police officers must refine their tactics and guard against misperceiving ...
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Why One of the Wealthiest Countries in the World Is Failing to Feed Its People 22.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
On May 8 2015 I awoke to discover that not only were we not looking forward to a new coalition government in the UK, but that the overall collapse of the Liberal Democrats and the Labour Party had given the Conservative government a mandate. At an individual level I'm likely to see some benefits from the strong neo-liberalism that underpins this government's ideology, but I'm concerned about a further deepening of the division between those who have and those who have not. This will mean the continued exponential growth in the numbers of people requiring emergency food assistance and increased numbers of children and elderly with inadequate food supply. This will also translate into higher rates of obesity, diet-related illness and malnutrition. The Most Vulnerable In the United Kingdom there are nearly 5m people today living as food insecure . Wendy Wills, an expert in food and public health, defines this as those who are unable to acquire or consume an adequate quality or sufficient quantity of food ...
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Kansas welfare cash limits mean poor lose money in fees 22.5.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
A dollar bill is a special kind of thing. You can keep it as long as you like. You can pay for things with it. No one will ever charge you a fee. No one will ask any questions about your credit history. And other people won't try to tell you that they know how to spend that dollar better than ...
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Twitter opens $3 million tech skills center for SF poor, homeless 21.5.2015 SFGate: Business & Technology
Not only does the 4,000-square-foot Twitter-funded learning center offer child care next to its computer lab, but it’s also staffed weekdays with Twitter employee volunteers and social service workers, offering coaching on everything from basic tech skills to housing and job assistance. Moodie, who was homeless for 10 years after she left home at 15, is among the low-income residents already using the NeighborNest, one block from Twitter’s Market Street headquarters and within walking distance of many homeless and low-income Tenderloin residents of Compass Family Services, the tech company’s partner on the project. “Twitter employees care deeply about giving back to the community, and the Twitter NeighborNest will allow us to cultivate stronger ties with our local partners and neighbors,” Costolo said. In a deal to keep the company from leaving San Francisco, the city allowed certain Mid-Market companies to avoid payroll taxes for six years by signing a community benefits agreement that promises ...
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WASH and Environmental Sustainability: The Need for Integrated Objectives 19.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASH targets within MDG7: Achievements to date Fifteen years after the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) came into force, a number of reports have communicated the progress made against each target and what remains to be achieved. Two particular targets of MDG7, "Ensuring Environmental Sustainability," are relevant to WASH. Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation." To date, 2.3 billion people have gained access to improved sources of drinking water, yet many remain at risk due to poor or nonexistent water treatment; 77 countries have met the sanitation target, but 79 countries are off-track to achieve the goal by the end of 2015. That leaves 2.5 billion people still without access to improved facilities, and 1 billion still practicing open defecation. Target 7.D, "achieve, by 2020, a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers," was met in advance of the deadline, with more ...
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The Poverty Machine: Student Debt, Class Society and Securing Bonded Labor 19.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
At the dawn of the 20th century, very few American students attended high school, as the demands of the heavy-industrial and the agricultural economies of that period were ill-suited to an extended education beyond the family sphere. In the middle of the 20th century, most Americans who either aspired to or had to work entered the full-time workforce immediately after high school, for such a postwar economy featured plenty of growth and comparably fair wage-compensation for the average worker. As the economy became more complex in its labor needs, its extending length of education complemented these requirements. The transformation of the agricultural economy into the technological economy after World War II, in turn, transformed the university, once the commune of the well-to-do, into a center for job training, an adjunct to industry, and one which continued to increase in enrollment as the technological necessities of an increasingly complex economy required further education. What was once the realm ...
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Want to See EDF at SXSW Eco 2015? Cast Your Vote! 18.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By EDF Blogs Every year, SXSW Eco – one of the most high-profile environmental conferences – selects its programming based on votes from the public. This means anyone, regardless of whether you submitted a panel, can cast a vote. This year, seven experts from Environmental Defense Fund are featured on dynamic panels that cover everything from solar equity and new utility business models to innovative building efficiency programs and the threat of methane pollution. To make sure EDF and energy-related programming is represented at the conference in Austin, TX this October, we are asking our readers to please vote for your favorite EDF panels and presentations. How to vote To vote, you will need to login or create a PanelPicker account here: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com. The voting is simple, just give a session a “Thumbs Up” or “Thumbs Down,” leave some comments, and move on. This whole process will take you all of one minute. Voting ends this Friday, May 22nd, so please help us spread the word by sharing ...
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Shrouded in secrecy, one of Africa's biggest land deals stalls-TRFN 18.5.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Chris Arsenault MARKALA, Mali (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Malian farmer Balima Coulibaly and his fellow villagers watched with dread as 100,000 hectares of fertile land they have farmed for generations were handed to Libyan investors with no discussion about the impact on their impoverished communities. In one of Africa's largest and most secretive foreign agricultural investment deals, oil-rich Libya, under the leadership of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, signed a 50-year, renewable lease for the land with Mali's government in 2008. The land in the Office of Niger, the agricultural heart of the West African country, was provided rent free, with water rights included, on the condition that Libya build canals and roads to cultivate rice and cattle there.
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A Strong Beginning Makes Way for Improved Results: Equality in Climate Finance Mechanisms 16.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change is happening now and it's happening globally--it affects everyone everywhere. However, climate change will not affect everyone equally. As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states in its 2014 fifth official report , and as countless studies and projects have subsequently affirmed, the impacts of a changing climate will be differential--and gender will be one of the specific factors that determines acute vulnerability and ability to cope. Enabling environments for resilience demand the full participation of women and men alike and the full respect for both women's and men's needs and capacities. Likewise, the financial mechanisms supporting climate change action must be responsive to diverse communities' needs. Historically, climate finance has had limited focus on and benefit for the poorest and most disadvantaged populations within developing countries, and for women in particular. This exacerbates vulnerability and climate injustice, overall reducing the resilience of nations ...
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Feared and fearless: A Q&A with journalist Gretchen Morgenson, watchdog of Wall Street and Washington 16.5.2015 MinnPost
New York Times Gretchen Morgenson Gretchen Morgenson 's first brush with journalism was not indicative of her later achievements. After graduating from St. Olaf College in Northfield and moving to New York City in 1976, she landed an $8,000-a-year job at Vogue magazine where she served, in her words, as an "assistant slave" to a tyrannical editor. But by 1981, her last year there, she was writing a personal finance column for the magazine. Eventually, she found her way to Forbes magazine, where she plunged into business journalism as an investigative reporter and editor under the command of legendary editor James Michaels. In 1998, she joined The New York Times as assistant business and financial editor. Four years later, she won the Pulitzer Prize for beat reporting for her "trenchant and incisive coverage of Wall Street." Week after week, her deeply reported Sunday column, "Fair Game ,"  exposes CEO pay abuses, corporate governance failures, conflicts of interest, inadequate disclosures and ...
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Closure of Somali remittance firms hurts the poor 15.5.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 Closing Somali remittance firms in Kenya in response to Al-Shabaab cuts off a pro-poor financial system and only hurts the poor. For more than two decades, on the first week of every month, I would find myself scrambling to send money to relatives in various cities, towns and village across the Somali territories and neighbouring countries. Despite my good intentions, I rarely succeeded in reaching my hawala (remittance firm) agent on time, though always mindful that too much delay could result in a family's eviction or student's ...
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Creating Sustainable Populations Humanely 15.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Creating Sustainable Populations Humanely Space. The final frontier. But this is a planetary, not interplanetary tale. Here, on every surface of Earth, man has planted his foot, physical or otherwise. We have morphed from quest to conquest with frightening success, as our numbers increase exponentially , mindlessly spreading. Earth's cornucopia of plants, animals, and fungi is melting into oblivion before us, mocking the name we gave ourselves to distinguish us from them: Homo sapiens -- Thinking Man. Clearly, we are not. Source wirednewyork.com Ironically, galaxies of information divert us from hewing to a core, ancient tenet of survival. Consider biblical Eden: was the lesson of our exile "Obey God or else"? Or "You've been greedy, but I'm giving you another chance"? If the latter, then "go forth, be fruitful and multiply" means that we do so as we let the rest of life also be fruitful and multiply- ie, SHARE. If your greed harms the environment that sustains you, paradise will disappear, as it is ...
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MIT Group Used Solar Energy To Make Salty Water Drinkable In Off-Grid Areas 14.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While there are many technologies out there than can effectively remove salt from water to make it drinkable, most are expensive and rely heavily on electricity –- rendering them all but useless in remote, off-grid villages. That’s why a group of engineers from MIT, backed by Jain Irrigation Systems, set out to invent a system that relies on solar energy to bring clean drinking water to rural areas in India, The Washington Post reported. About 21 percent of India’s communicable diseases are related to unsafe water, according to the World Bank. According to MIT researchers 60 percent of India has brackish groundwater -- while not toxic, that water is too salty to be ideal for human consumption The group, which took home the first-place Desal Prize last month in the “Securing Water for Food” challenge , used a method called electrodialysis, which relies on electricity and ultraviolet rays, according to the aid organization. The first-place winners were awarded a $140,000 grant. When salt dissolves into ...
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Why A Philadelphia Grocery Chain Is Thriving In Food Deserts 14.5.2015 NPR News
Brown's Super Stores operates seven profitable supermarkets in low-income neighborhoods in Philadelphia. The founder says it's because he figured out what communities needed in a neighborhood store.
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