User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: May 24 2017 01:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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URIDU fights poverty & empowers rural illiterate women with solar powered MP3 players 24.5.2017 TreeHugger
The MP3ForLife device is loaded with 400+ answers to common questions about health, nutrition, family planning, and more, translated into more than 100 languages.
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Footing the $15 Million Bill for the Dakota Access Pipeline's Private Army 23.5.2017 Truthout.com
Police face off against protestors occupying a bridge immediately north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, October 28, 2016. (Photo: Angus Mordant / The New York Times) Last fall, the eyes of the world were fixated on Standing Rock . Among the images burned into the brains of so many abroad were those of Morton County sheriff's department, joined by law enforcement officers from across the country, bedecked in military gear and armed to the teeth, brutalizing defenseless water protectors for expressing their first amendment rights and freedom of religion. Eyes were opened when mercs sicced vicious attack dogs on women and children guarding sacred burial grounds with their lives. Folks thousands of miles away watched in horror as they witnessed concussion grenades being thrown into crowds and elders being maced in the midst of sweat lodge raids. People will never forget live stream video picked up by mainstream media, showing hundreds of civilians being shot with water ...
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King County exec wants to more than double levy for veterans, seniors, homeless 23.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

King County Executive Dow Constantine is proposing to more than double the size of the Veterans and Human Services Levy to increase affordable housing and add services for seniors.
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"Repair the Damage From the Drug War": Susan Burton on a New Way of Life to End Mass Incarceration 19.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A New Way of Life founder and executive director Susan Burton. (Image: Democracy Now) The story of Susan Burton is one of tragic loss followed by pitiless punishment by the criminal legal system -- but it is also, as Michelle Alexander says, "a story about personal transformation and collective power." Read how Ms. Burton found her calling working to support and liberate women who've faced similar struggles to hers, in Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women. Get your copy by donating to Truthout today! We are joined by two leading voices in the fight against mass incarceration: Michelle Alexander, author of the best-selling book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, and Susan Burton, founder and executive director of A New Way of Life, a nonprofit that provides housing and other support to formerly incarcerated women. Burton is the author of the new memoir, Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for ...
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"Clean This Place, Don't Displace": Activists Battle for Environmental Justice in Washington, DC 19.5.2017 Truthout.com
April 25, 2016, protest of soccer stadium groundbreaking residents from Syphax Gardens, Q St. Corridor and Greenleaf. (Photo: Kari Fulton) Following the People's Climate March, Washington, DC residents have redoubled their fight for better air quality and to protect public housing in their gentrifying city. In particular, residents of Buzzard Point, a majority low-income African American community, are organizing to confront the proliferation of toxins from construction projects, such as the DC United Soccer Stadium. Buzzard Point in southwest DC is at risk of riverine and coastal flooding due to climate change. Of the ward's 84,000 residents, 93.3 percent are people of color. A series of development projects like the DC United Soccer Stadium, while at face value a boon for economic growth, unearth decades of toxicity in Buzzard Point, exposing community members to harmful substances while at the same time threatening to push out low- and middle-income residents. April 25, 2016, protest of soccer stadium ...
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Low-income tenants in D.C. may soon get legal help 19.5.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Low-income tenants in D.C. may soon get legal help
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Tribes fighting pipeline drop appeal but battle continues 19.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bismarck, N.D. • American Indian tribes who are still fighting the Dakota Access oil pipeline in court have dropped an appeal of a federal judge’s decision that allowed final construction to proceed on the project that is just two weeks from operating commercially. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in early March refused to stop completion of the pipeline based on the claims of Sioux tribes that it threatens water they consider sacred. The Cheyenne River Sioux appealed the decision to the U.S. ...
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Despite Nigeria's Laws, LGBTQ Acceptance Is On The Rise 19.5.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
ABUJA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A tentative, growing acceptance of gay men and women in Nigeria offers a seed of hope, human rights campaigners said on Wednesday, in a country where the outlawing of gay sex is supported by nine in ten people, according to a new report. A 2017 survey by NOI Polls compared attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in Nigeria against a 2015 poll. It found a 7 percent increase in acceptance of LGBT people, and a 9 percent rise to 39 percent of those surveyed who think that LGBT people should be allowed equal access to public services such as healthcare, education and housing. “These changes might look small, but let us acknowledge the progress,” said Olumide Makanjuola, executive director of The Initiative for Equal Rights (TIERS), a charity working to protect the rights of sexual minorities in Nigeria, which commissioned the survey. “The fact that there is a small differential is important to acknowledge. Nigeria is not an easy place to ...
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Where Are India's Heat Hotspots? 18.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
by Gulrez Shah Azhar and Jaime Madrigano Heat waves across the world have killed tens of thousands of people since the turn of the century. In the U.S., more people die from deaths related to heat than all other natural phenomena combined . Parts of West Asia are expected to become inhospitable to human life by the end of this century. And in recent years, India and neighboring regions have experienced several devastating heat waves , causing the country to increasingly focus on a growing global concern—rising temperatures as a public health threat. By 2022 India’s population is projected to exceed China’s, making it home to one-fifth of the world’s population. As a developing country located in the tropics, India suffers from factors that make it vulnerable to heat waves: persistent poverty, poor sanitation, a precarious water and electricity supply and low rate of access to health care. Lives can be saved by simple prevention measures that include educating people how to cope and having an organized ...
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Tribes fighting pipeline drop appeal but battle continues 18.5.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — American Indian tribes who are still fighting the Dakota Access oil pipeline in court have dropped an appeal of a federal judge’s decision that allowed final construction to proceed on the project that is just two weeks from operating commercially. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in early March refused to stop […]
When your home no longer meets your needs, renovating — instead of moving — may be your best bet 18.5.2017 Washington Post
When your home no longer meets your needs, renovating — instead of moving — may be your best bet
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This Refugee Camp Is The First In The World To Be Powered By Solar Energy 18.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A group of about 20,000 Syrian refugees living outdoors have access to electricity as of Wednesday thanks to a newly constructed solar plant in the Azraq refugee camp in Jordan. It’s the first and only solar-powered refugee camp in the world. “Each family can now connect a fridge, a TV, a fan, have light inside the shelter and charge their phones, which is critical for refugees to keep in contact with their relatives abroad,” the U.N.’s refugee agency, UNHCR, said in a statement. UNHCR built the 2-megawatt solar photovoltaic plant farm in collaboration with the IKEA Foundation’s Brighter Lives for Refugees campaign, which provided the funding, according to the statement. Azraq is located in the desert region of northern Jordan. Its population of about 54,000 people has only had sporadic access to power since the camp was constructed in 2014, UNHCR added. The only source of electricity has come from solar lanterns. “Lighting up the camp is not only a symbolic achievement; it provides a safer environment ...
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People on the Margins Have "Everything to Lose" in the Next Net Neutrality Fight 17.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Students who lack internet access in their homes are often at a clear educational disadvantage when compared to their peers who have internet access. (Photo: A Healthier Michigan ) Republicans on the Federal Communications Commission will begin the process of rolling back its net neutrality rules at a meeting on Thursday. Internet users could lose a source of leverage over monolithic internet service providers like AT&T and Comcast, but for low-income consumers, a repeal could mean the difference between staying connected and falling further behind. Students who lack internet access in their homes are often at a clear educational disadvantage when compared to their peers who have internet access. (Photo: A Healthier Michigan ) Last week, while pundits were debating whether crashing web servers at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) were hit by hackers or simply by a flood of public comments following another viral segment on net neutrality by TV comedian John Oliver, FCC Commissioner Mignon ...
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Food To Cure What Ails You: When Cookbooks Treated Meals As Medicine 17.5.2017 NPR News
At the turn of the 20th century, when access to professional care was spotty, many cookbooks served up recipes for the sick — some (brandy) more appealing than others (toast water).
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CLC awards First Nations child advocate with human rights honour 16.5.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Meagan Gillmore Indigenous child advocate Cindy Blackstock was awarded the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) award for Outstanding Service to Humanity at the congress's 2017 national convention in Toronto last week. Blackstock, the executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, has devoted her career to fighting for equal treatment for First Nations children. Speaking to delegates on May 9, Blackstock dedicated the award to these children, calling them "the real heroes of this country." In one of the world's richest countries, children living in First Nations reservations often can't access education, health care or basics of life, like clean drinking water, because of racial discrimination. Blackstock urged attendees to take action to end systemic racial discrimination against Indigenous children. The 150 anniversary of Confederation is a "crossroads," Blackstock said, that invites Canadians to consider the legacy of racial discrimination and how it keeps the country ...
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The Daily 202: Trump’s chaotic White House once again makes a bad story worse 16.5.2017 Washington Post: Politics
‘Reckless’ disclosure to the Russians is part a pattern of poor judgment
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Oil pipeline opponents try going after the money 14.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bismarck, N.D. • Opposition to the Dakota Access oil pipeline has persuaded some banks to stop supporting projects that might harm the environment or tread on indigenous rights, but calling the divest movement a success might be a stretch. It doesn’t appear to be hurting the ability of energy companies to get financing and it doesn’t seem to concern lenders broadly. Yet pipeline opponents see victory in the fact that they have made financial institutions more aware of indigenous rights — and the...
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The Politics of Water Access Under Occupation: Is International Law Sufficient? 14.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Palestinian men sit in the shade next to a destroyed water reservoir in Khuza'a, in the southern Gaza Strip, August 4, 2014. (Photo: Sergey Ponomarev / The New York Times) Palestinian Water Crisis on Track to Worsen Following the Palestinian Authority's April 26th announcement that it will  immediately stop funding the Gaza Strip's electricity , purchased from Israel, Gaza's already catastrophic humanitarian situation is poised to worsen. The move is seen by many as a shortsighted attempt by PA President Mahmoud Abbas to exert pressure on Hamas in an effort to show strength before his  meeting with US President Donald Trump , which took place on May 3rd. Vital services dependent on emergency generators, such as  dialysis for 620 kidney patients , are now threatened. Furthermore, Gaza's longstanding, already-dire water crisis could be pushed over the brink by such a large-scale electricity shortage. Periodically, whenever a funding crisis threatens electricity shut-downs in Gaza -- and like clockwork ...
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The Promise And Peril Of School Vouchers 12.5.2017 NPR News
Indiana's private school voucher program is the largest of its kind in the U.S. Whether it's "social justice" or "an assault" on public schools depends on whom you ask.
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Split vote keeps records of homeless shelter site discussions secret 12.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Records of the Salt Lake City Council’s closed meetings last fall to determine locations for new homeless shelters will be available to the public in 75 years. That’s when the restrictive protection of those documents runs out under Utah’s Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA). Thursday afternoon, activist George Chapman, a former mayoral candidate, lost an appeal to gain access to minutes and recordings of those meetings at a Utah State Records Committee hearing. The vote was 3-2... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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