User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Mar 28 2015 04:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Tackling Climate Change -- For Our Kids 28.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If you have children or grandchildren, you probably have wondered what the world will be like for them in 20 or 30 years. Will it be a better place? Will climate change upend their lives? It's something I have thought about a lot since I became the president of the World Bank Group in July 2012. Within my first few months on the job, I was briefed on an upcoming climate change report , and the findings shocked me. I knew then that tackling climate change would be one of my top priorities as the leader of a development institution whose mission is ending extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity. If we don't start controlling climate change, the mission to end poverty will fail. Last week I delivered a lecture on climate change at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., to a roomful of young people who are surely thinking of climate change's impact on their lives. Climate scientists project that if we do nothing to control carbon emissions, temperatures could rise by as much as 4 degrees ...
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Solar Energy Lights Up in Latin America 27.3.2015 Truthout.com
In the face of rising global temperatures, glacial retreat, and ocean acidification, sustainable development of renewable resources has become more important than ever before. The U.S. government's National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) continues to report that within the past 12 years the globe has endured ten of the warmest years on record, and sea levels have risen an astounding 17 centimeters (or 6 and a half inches) within the past century. [i] However, recent advancements in solar energy could potentially lead to a solution that would feature the role of Latin American countries. According to GTM Research, a division of Greentech Media, the solar photovoltaic (PV) market in Latin America grew 370 percent in 2014, due to 625 megawatts (MW) worth of installations developed throughout the region during the year. [ii] In fact, with its 169 percent increase in solar energy between 2012 and 2014, Latin America is the "fastest-growing solar market in history." [iii] This rate even surpasses ...
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Green Climate Fund Moves Forward; Will Soon Disburse Climate Finance through 7 Institutions 27.3.2015 WRI Stories
The Green Climate Fund (GCF), which is expected to become the main vehicle for securing and distributing finance for climate adaptation and mitigation, moved one step closer to disbursing funds this week. The Fund’s Board accredited seven institutions, allowing them to submit proposals to access the Fund’s resources. Once proposals are accepted, these institutions will be able to start delivering funding to the communities most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. This funding will... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Local cycling groups eye an easier path up Emerald Mountain 27.3.2015 Steamboat Pilot
Local cycling advocates want to take some of the pain out of the initial climb up Emerald Mountain. To do this, they are proposing a new trail that would give children and beginner mountain bikers a gentler path up the mountain. "It's kind of unfortunate that we currently suffer through the first half the mountain to enjoy the upper half when we could very easily enjoy the lower half as well," Routt County Riders Vice President Eric Meyer said. On Wednesday, Meyer and other cycling advocates made their case to the Steamboat Springs Parks and Recreation Commission for why a new trail is needed. Meyer said he once took a group of young children on a biking field trip on Emerald Mountain. But because of the initial steep climb up the mountain that boasts 29 miles of established trails, it was more of a hiking day than a biking day for the 6- to 12-year-olds. "By the time we got up there (to access the beginner and intermediate trails), the kids were done," Meyer said Steamboat Ski and Bike Kare manager ...
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Who Could Benefit Most from Fair Electricity Pricing? Low-Income Customers 27.3.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Rory Christian These are exciting times. New York’s ‘Reforming the Energy Vision’ (REV) has paved the way for change of unprecedented proportions. New York regulators are preparing the state for a future in which rooftop solar installations are ubiquitous and the rumbling staccato of gasoline-fueled automobiles is replaced by the relative silence of electric vehicles. While more rooftop solar energy and electric vehicles are certainly part of our energy future, some of the biggest changes are likely to come from less visible – and less obvious – sources, particularly for customers in densely populated metropolitan areas and low-income customers, who make up a significant portion of New York state’s customer base. Urban dwellers, for whom mass transit is a central part of daily life and owning your own rooftop is less common, may view electric cars, rooftop solar, wind, battery storage, and on-site energy generation as appealing, but also abstractions more suitable for upstate homeowners than those ...
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A Nutrition Prescription for a Healthier America 26.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.A. and Greeshma Somashekar Our country is facing an epidemic: Approximately one in three adults and one in six children are obese in the United States. It is estimated that more than 95 percent of Americans will be overweight or obese within the next two decades. For the first time ever, we have a generation of kids who may not be as healthy or outlive their parents. Obesity is a major health issue as well as an economic concern for our nation. Obesity is a risk factor for some of the leading causes of preventable death -- heart disease, stroke, Type II diabetes, and certain types of cancer. The growing chronic disease burden linked to obesity costs our country about $150 billion a year, which represents almost 10 percent of the U.S. health care budget. On average, the annual medical expenses of obese people are $1,429 higher than for their non-obese counterparts. Good nutrition is an important protective factor against obesity and the preventable diseases associated with ...
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Survey ranks L.A. County behind Orange, Ventura in health outcomes 25.3.2015 LA Times: Commentary
According to a national survey, new data shows that Los Angeles County ranks 26th best in health outcomes when compared with California's 57 other counties.
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Voting yes: Urban development on the line in Vancouver transit referendum 24.3.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 If Vancouver votes "yes" in the transit referendum that means a more comprehensive plan will be put in place to service communities. But how does urban development affect this? If you live in metro Vancouver, your mailbox contains the chance to voice your opinion on the transit referendum. Whatever you think will be neatly expressed by one of two words: yes, or no. If you vote "yes," you vote for the expansion of public transit services. As metro Vancouver looks forward to an additional one million people, transportation will play a key role in supporting and shaping the urban development necessary to accommodate the demographic increase. Implicit in your choice is support for the existing development paradigm. The concern is that this development model could displace those who will most benefit from transportation ...
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Solar water system douses risks in Cameroon's arid north: TRFN 24.3.2015 Health
By Elias Ntungwe Ngalame MINDIF, Cameroon (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A pioneering solar-powered water distribution system is improving access to potable water in a region of Far North Cameroon beset by drought, water-related illness and an influx of refugees fleeing Boko Haram attacks. “Scarcity of potable water in this area has been a major problem because of the hilly but excessively dry landscape.
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4 Inspirations for Sustainable Transport from Rio de Janeiro 23.3.2015 WRI Stories
Known for its beautiful natural landscapes, Christ the Redeemer statue and Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro is an iconic city. Citizens’ ability to access these and local opportunities, though, has been limited due to increased reliance on individual cars that create traffic congestion. Low-income communities lacked access to reliable, affordable public transit. Commuters face atrociously long travel times due to intense traffic congestion exacerbated by the geography of the city. One study... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Four inspirations for sustainable transport from Rio 23.3.2015 THE CITY FIX
Known for its beautiful natural landscapes, Christ the Redeemer statue, and Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro is an iconic city. Citizens’ ability to access these and local opportunities, though, has been limited in the past due to increased reliance on ...
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Crosscurrents: Refusing "Safety" and Recommitting to Each Other 23.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Jeju Island. (Photo: MIN_Photo ) Want to challenge injustice and make real change happen? That's Truthout's goal - support our work with a donation today! Among some families on Jeju Island, discussions of the past are still considered off-limits. By the time I leave Kentucky's federal prison center, where I'm an inmate with a three month sentence, the world's 12th-largest city may be without water. Estimates put the water reserve of Sao Paulo, a city of 20 million people, at sixty days. Sporadic outages have already begun, the wealthy are pooling money to receive water in tankers, and government officials are heard discussing five-day shutoffs of the water supply, and the possibility of warning residents to flee. This past year United States people watched stunned as water was cut off, household by household, to struggling people in Detroit, less due to any total water shortage than to a drying up of any political power accessible to the poor in an increasingly undemocratic nation. A local privatization ...
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Making a Dent in the Global Water Crisis: Why It's Time to Double Down 23.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In recognition of World Water Day 2015, we re-commit, refresh and strengthen our efforts to solve the global water crisis. Achieving affordable access to safe water and sanitation for all has been one of humanity's most intractable problems. This is despite the fact that billions of us take these services for granted. We have known how to deliver affordable, safe water for more than 100 years yet for more than 2.5 billion people these services are absent. Some of the reasons this problem persists include the high cost of infrastructure, complex governance, lack of proper operations & maintenance, unrealistically low water tariffs, poor water utility management, poorly targeted subsidies and misguided development assistance. Yet, today, like every day, people are finding water somewhere. They are coping and making decisions with incredibly difficult trade-offs. Do they drink the water from the brown stream outside their home or walk five miles to a "cleaner" stream? Or do they purchase water of ...
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The Water Crisis Creates A Gender Rights Problem. Here's Who's Solving It 22.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Globally, women and girls in developing countries spend an estimated 200 million hours every single day just collecting water in areas where potable water isn’t available locally. It’s an arduous task that leads to debilitating injuries, yet the chore falls on the heads of women and children in 76 percent of households surveyed, according to UNICEF. The errand not only causes physical pain, but also cuts into opportunities to learn and work. With increasing advancements, women can spend less time gathering water and more time getting an education, earning money and more. Here's who's helping solve the problem. Increasing Water Access Gives Women More Time to Go to School Though it's backbreaking work that often requires meandering through dimly lit areas, girls are twice as likely as boys to be tasked with fetching water in homes in developing countries where children are responsible for the chore, according to UNICEF. Shouldering this time-consuming effort leads girls to come late to school, or to miss ...
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The Water Crisis Creates A Gender Rights Problem. Here's Who Solving It 22.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Globally, women and girls in developing countries spend an estimated 200 million hours every single day just collecting water in areas where potable water isn’t available locally. It’s an arduous task that leads to debilitating injuries, yet the chore falls on the heads of women and children in 76 percent of households surveyed, according to UNICEF. The errand not only causes physical pain, but also cuts into opportunities to learn and work. With increasing advancements, women can spend less time gathering water and more time getting an education, earning money and more. Here's who's helping solve the problem. Increasing Water Access Gives Women More Time to Go to School Though it's backbreaking work that often requires meandering through dimly lit areas, girls are twice as likely as boys to be tasked with fetching water in homes in developing countries where children are responsible for the chore, according to UNICEF. Shouldering this time-consuming effort leads girls to come late to school, or to miss ...
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The Empty Calories of Fossil Fuels 21.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In nutrition science, there's a famous paradox: in many parts of the world, especially the "advanced" nations, the poorest people are not starving. Instead they're too fat: poverty is correlated with obesity. In the U.S., for instance, one-third of adults who earn less than $15,000 per year are obese, compared with one-quarter who earn at least $50,000, according to a project of the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Hungry people with limited income turn to the abundant, inexpensive calories in high-carbohydrate foods, and do so at the expense of their health and the health of their children. They are overweight and malnourished and unhealthy, but they're not hungry. By choosing fossil fuels as our primary energy source, we are doing just the same thing: imperiling the health of the planet by turning to an abundant, cheap source of energy (calories, after all) and ignoring the serious effects. We may be shortening the life of Earth, but, hey, we're not starved for ...
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From Basic Income to Social Dividends: Sharing the Value of Common Resources 20.3.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Make Every Day Water Day 20.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It was during July of 2010 when I found myself running and playing with dozens of orphaned children just outside of Port Au Prince. Just six months earlier, Haiti had faced one of the world's most catastrophic earthquakes. I found that one of the children seemed quite fond of me, and I of her. Her name was Gwen, and the other children called her "Baby Gwen." Just two years old, Baby Gwen was the only child at the orphanage who technically was not an orphan. Long before the disaster of January 12th, Baby Gwen and her mother, Grace, came to the orphanage for reasons other than most: lack of water. In Haiti, 3.5 million people lack access to safe water . For most families, it is the responsibility of the women and children to find and collect it. Haiti is not unique in this tradition: Women and children from around the world collectively spend 140 million hours walking more than three miles to collect water each day. When Grace was 12 years old, she contributed to those millions of hours spent collecting ...
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Crosscurrents 20.3.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Republicans Vote To Hide Costs Of Repealing Obamacare In Budget 20.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Republicans on the Senate Budget Committee voted Thursday to shield attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act from objections that it would add to the government's budget deficit. The budget resolution for 2016 includes what are known as reconciliation instructions that tell several congressional committees to come up with ways to undo Obamacare. Such reconciliation measures only require 51 votes to pass in the Senate. But the spending plan also includes language that allows lawmakers to raise what are known as budget points of order against any legislation that would add more than $5 billion to the deficit, and block it. According to the last estimate by the Congressional Budget Office, repealing Obamcare would add $210 billion to the deficit . That would seem to make it likely that any Obamacare repeal effort would run afoul of a point of order, which takes 60 votes to surmount. So, later in the resolution, it exempts an attempt to repeal Obamacare from those points of order. "What we ...
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