User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Nov 26 2014 05:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In Pakistan, A Self-Styled Teacher Holds Class for 150 In A Cowshed 26.11.2014 NPR: All Things Considered
In a remote village, poor children are on the front line of an education battle. The village's only educated person aims to teach them — and shame teachers who are paid but don't show up for work.
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America's Infrastructure Disinvestment Will Slow the Development of a Sustainable Economy 24.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is the 50th anniversary of New York's Verrazano-Narrows Bridge , the span that connects Staten Island with Brooklyn. As a child growing up in Brooklyn I remember watching its towers rise as if by magic. I always connected it with the 1964 World's Fair which took place the same year the bridge opened, thinking they were both signs of the dazzling modern world that we would all get to live in. The bridge remains as beautiful as ever, although it eventually led to a great deal of poorly planned development in Staten Island, and its rising tolls remain a source of frustration to many who need to use it. Still, like New York's third water tunnel and the Second Avenue Subway it is a sign of New York's willingness to invest in the future. Infrastructure in a place like New York is a matter of survival. The City's $20 billion climate resiliency plan includes major improvements in critical pieces of the City's infrastructure, and the need for this investment transcends politics. But unfortunately New York is ...
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Hungry for Commitment 24.11.2014 Oxfam International RSS main feed
Ipiashe siphons water for irrigation, Gutu Province, Zimbabwe, September 2011. Photo: Annie Bungeroth/Oxfam

Hungry for Commitment

Food security in southern Africa relies upon small-scale agriculture, a sector in which women take the lead. However, smallholder farmers are among the most vulnerable people to food insecurity, often lacking the resources and access needed to produce or procure adequate food.

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Arresting Portraits Give Voices To Homeless People In America's Poorest Big City 23.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
More than a quarter of Philadelphians are in desperate need of some brotherly love. With 26.3 percent of its population living below the national poverty line, Philadelphia is the poorest big city in the United States, Philly.com reported in September, and many of those living in poverty are trying to make ends meet without a roof over their head. While nonprofit Project Home said it's difficult to calculate the exact number of residents living on the streets, it estimates 650 people are living without shelter in Philadelphia at any point in time. And while roughly 12,000 individuals access shelter every year in the city, that figure doesn't include those who are turned away due to a variety of reasons. Getty photographer Spencer Platt captured the heartache and hope of some of Philadelphia's most vulnerable residents in a series at Broad Street Ministry (BSM) on Nov. 20. According to Getty, the Philadelphia nonprofit serves thousands of meals five days a week and offers medical screenings and ...
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Want to See How Governments Are Making Real Progress? Look to the Cities Tackling Our Biggest Problems 22.11.2014 Truthout.com
A bike sharing rack on Dearborn street in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo: Esther Dyson ) Will Truthout’s mission continue in 2015 and beyond? That depends on readers like you. Make a tax-deductible donation now to sustain our work! If you've been looking to the federal government for action on big challenges such as poverty, climate change, and immigration, this has been a devastating decade. Big money's dominance of elections, obstructionism by the Tea Party, and climate denial have brought action in Washington to a near standstill. But while the media focuses on the gridlock, a more hopeful story is unfolding. Cities are taking action. Climate change is a case in point. Cities are already experiencing the damage caused by an increasingly chaotic climate. Many are located along coastlines, where rising sea levels coupled with giant storms bring flooding and coastal erosion. Some low-lying areas are being abandoned. Others cities face protracted water shortages due to diminishing rainfall and shrinking ...
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In three Twin Cities neighborhoods, small-business development equals big growth 22.11.2014 MinnPost
Community developers have always believed in the power of small-business development, but never more so than now. Across the Twin Cities, creative collaborations are helping small businesses thrive and, in the process, sparking new economic vitality and community pride. On St. Paul’s East Side, in Little Africa along the Central Corridor in St. Paul and along West Broadway in North Minneapolis, small businesses and neighborhood organizations are playing a transformative role in reinvigorating these neighborhoods. From 1962 to 1997, a Whirlpool factory, the Hamm's/Stroh's Brewery, and a 3M plant all shut their doors on the East Side of St. Paul. The loss of these three big employers deeply shook the economic and social roots of the community. It's taken nearly two decades for the East Side to rise again. But today's renaissance is being fueled not by big business but by small ones. One catalyst helping rev the East Side's economic engine is the new East Side Enterprise Center (ESEC), a job-creation hub ...
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A Poetic Exploration Of The Hunting Tradition In America's North 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photographer Clare Benson comes from a long line of hunters. Growing up in northern Michigan, she remembers her father, now 82 years old, winning archery championships and reminiscing about his time as a hunting guide in the Alaskan wilderness. For her, the tradition of hunting -- and the rugged northern landscape that serves as its backdrop -- represents themes of memory and mortality, ones she's managed to weave in and out of her work for some time. Her series "The Shepard's Daughter" addresses her connection to hunting most directly. The images show Benson, her sister and her father trekking through snow-covered scenes, respectfully carrying the spoils of hunting trips past. She pointedly juxtaposes portraits of her family members lounging in contemplation with photographs of the animals they hunt, skin, cook and eat. Set in a vast world unfamiliar to most urban dwellers, Benson paints a picture of a hunting tradition we don't often encounter. The Shepherd's Daughter, 2012 The project, she explained ...
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The World's First Rural Feed-In Tariff? 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
How do we move clean energy access beyond just a light bulb ? With millions of dollars in new investment capping a record year for beyond the grid solar markets, that's the question many are now asking. This record investment is building markets, starting with pico solar products like lanterns, from the bottom up. But just over the horizon lies much larger solar home systems and the next big opportunity capable of powering whole communities -- mini-grids. One way to get us from here to mini-grids is a novel new concept: rural feed-in tariffs, or RFITs for short. What an RFIT does is adapt the principles that made feed-in tariffs (FITs) wildly successful in Germany and other parts of the world -- including certainty for investors and early stage support for nascent clean energy markets -- to a radically different operating environment. That's because policy making beyond the grid requires a whole new approach steeped in the realities of the communities it's attempting to serve. That's how you tame the ...
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Are We Failing Our Kids? 21.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Our children's health and welfare is our responsibility. As countries across the globe are celebrating Universal Children's Day and recommitting to improve the welfare of kids everywhere, I can't help but wonder if we're doing enough to protect our kids here at home. Today's children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. More than one-third of kids and teens in America are overweight or obese and even fewer are meeting the recommended national physical activity guidelines. Half of our kids have zero access to safe places to play and get active like parks, community centers, bike paths and sidewalks. Kids of color are more likely to live in park -- poor communities, and not surprisingly, have higher rates of obesity. As if the lack of safe places to play wasn't a significant enough hurdle in and of itself, many of our kids have been hit with a double whammy: air pollution. According to the American Lung Association , nearly 50 percent of all Americans live in communities where pollution makes ...
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Steamboat A to Z 21.11.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Wondering what to do this winter in this fair hamlet of ours nestled at the base of Mt. Werner? Practice your alphabet while thumbing through the following A to Z activities. A Apres Aaah, it doesn’t get much better than kicking you legs up by the fire with a beer, wine or cocktail in hand after a hard day on the slopes. Luckily, apres options abound in Steamboat, letting you finish your day on Mt. Werner by skiing or riding straight into your favorite libation, munchies, live music and more (and hot chocolate for the kiddos). Options include the famous Ice Bar at Slopeside Grill, just off the Right-O-Way trail at the base of the ski area; the T-bar in the old patrol headquarters below the Christie lift; Truffle Pig in the new One Steamboat Place; and the Bear River Bar and Grill deck in Gondola Square, now home to a European-inspired terrace and umbrella bar. A slew of choices also exist downtown, all with happy hour specials for after your day on the slopes. Art Scene Enjoy Steamboat’s burgeoning art ...
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Are We Failing Our Kids? 21.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Our children's health and welfare is our responsibility. As countries across the globe are celebrating Universal Children's Day and recommitting to improve the welfare of kids everywhere, I can't help but wonder if we're doing enough to protect our kids here at home. Today's children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. More than one-third of kids and teens in America are overweight or obese and even fewer are meeting the recommended national physical activity guidelines. Half of our kids have zero access to safe places to play and get active like parks, community centers, bike paths and sidewalks. Kids of color are more likely to live in park -- poor communities, and not surprisingly, have higher rates of obesity. As if the lack of safe places to play wasn't a significant enough hurdle in and of itself, many of our kids have been hit with a double whammy: air pollution. According to the American Lung Association , nearly 50 percent of all Americans live in communities where pollution makes ...
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Pope demands just distribution of world's bounty 20.11.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
Pope Francis demanded a more just distribution of the world's bounty for the poor and hungry Thursday, telling a U.N. conference on nutrition that access to food is a basic human right that shouldn't be subject to market speculation and quests for profit.
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Pope demands just distribution of world's bounty 20.11.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
Pope Francis demanded a more just distribution of the world's bounty for the poor and hungry Thursday, telling a U.N. conference on nutrition that access to food is a basic human right that shouldn't be subject to market speculation and quests for profit.
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It's World Toilet Day: Why you should care 19.11.2014 TreeHugger
This year there is a special theme,: Equality and dignity
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Lessons on Mobilizing the Rising American Electorate 19.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Conservatives have been deploying strategies to suppress and subdue voting by the rising American electorate, from gerrymandering districts to gutting the Voting Rights Act. As a counter-balance, Forward Together has been working with 150 organizations in a nationwide initiative called Strong Families to shift policy and culture so that all families - of every kind - can thrive. That has involved educating and mobilizing within historically marginalized communities for civic engagement. National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) GOTV canvassing team in Miami-Dade. (Photo: Dian Alarcon) Will Truthout’s mission continue in 2015 and beyond? That depends on readers like you. Make a tax-deductible donation now to sustain our work! The morning after the midterm elections, many on the left wondered, where was the Rising American Electorate (RAE) - youth, single women and people of color - who delivered victories for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012? Of the 33 percent of registered voters who turned ...
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18 Stunning India-Based Instagram Feeds You Should Be Following 19.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A photo posted by Subhash Chandra (@subhash_chandra) on Sep 9, 2014 at 7:34pm PDT 5. Hashim Badani: A self-described "chronicler of the mundane," Badani tends to shoot in and around Mumbai. Every once in a while though, the Lonely Planet contributor happens on somewhere completely surreal (see below). A photo posted by hashimbadani (@hashimbadani) on Nov 11, 2014 at 12:15am PDT 6. Siddhartha Joshi: This wandering photographer is another strong portraitist, whose subjects range from kids at play to the army men patrolling India's northern borders. A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Aug 8, 2014 at 5:56am PDT A photo posted by Sid (@siddharthajoshi) on Oct 10, 2014 at 8:22am PDT 7. @my_mumbai: This popular feed features work by anyone who tags their photos #my_mumbai. The resulting account is sweeping, well-curated, and -- for anyone drawn to the world's densest locales -- undoubtedly worth a follow. A photo posted by #MyMumbai (@my_mumbai) on Oct 10, 2014 at 2:59am PDT A photo posted by #MyMumbai ...
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Almost two billion people use water contaminated by faeces 19.11.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Nearly two billion people use water contaminated by faeces, posing a global health risk despite billions of dollars spent on sanitation, said a report published on Wednesday. One in seven people, mostly poor and living in rural areas, still defecates in the open, contaminating water and creating a breeding ground for diarrhea, cholera, dysentery and typhoid. "If people don't invest in sanitation the costs are going to be incredible and health is going to be a big issue," said Bruce Gordon of the World Health Organization (WHO). ...
Gift-wrapped: Exploring the history of selling pleasure 19.11.2014 New Scientist: Living World
Gift-wrapped: Exploring the history of selling pleasure
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Legal Vacuum Fuels Conflicts Over Water in El Salvador 18.11.2014 Truthout.com
Tacuba, El Salvador- Rural communities and social organisations in El Salvador agree that the lack of specific laws is one of the main hurdles to resolving disputes over water in the country. “If the right to water was regulated in the constitution, we wouldn’t be caught up in this conflict,” David Díaz, a representative of the  Asociación de Desarrollo Comunal Bendición de Dios  (Adescobd), which administered a rural water supply system, told IPS. He lamented what he called one of the biggest setbacks regarding water supplies in this Central American nation. On Oct. 30, right-wing lawmakers blocked the single-chamber legislature from ratifying a previously approved reform to article 69 of the constitution, which granted the right to water and food the status of a human right, thus forcing the state to guarantee universal access. Adescobd emerged in late 1995 in Tacuba, a town in the western department (province) of Ahuachapán, 116 km west of San Salvador, to manage a project for a piped water system ...
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RTD fare study should include fairness, says board member 18.11.2014 Denver Post: Local
A study of the Regional Transportation District fare system should keep low-income riders in mind because they are the ones who rely the most on bus and train service, one RTD board ...
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