User: flenvcenter Topic: Sustainability-National
Category: Environmental Justice :: Access
Last updated: Aug 16 2017 19:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Taller buildings weighed for Seattle’s Uptown neighborhood 16.8.2017 Seattle Times: Local

Taller buildings would be allowed in Seattle’s Uptown neighborhood, also known as Lower Queen Anne. Across most of Uptown, maximum heights would increase by one or two stories under a plan before the City Council. Closer to South Lake Union, maximums would reach to 160 feet.
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Wildfire in Yosemite National Park swells to 1,600 acres near Wawona, historic hotel 16.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

A wildfire in Yosemite National Park continued to grow Tuesday near the community of Wawona, home of the historic Big Trees Lodge, the park said.

As the fire inched closer to homes, the National Park Service asked to residents to be prepared to evacuate. Voluntary evacuations notices went out to...

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Delta Dispatches: Preserving Louisiana's Heritage 14.8.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Welcome to Delta Dispatches with hosts, Simone Maloz & Jacques Hebert. On today’s show Brian Ostahowski, President of the Louisiana Archaelological Society joins the program to talk about how the coastal crisis affects archaeology in Louisiana and archaeology in Coastal Louisiana. In the second half the show, Simone and Jacques are joined by Dr. Nathalie Dajko, Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Tulane University to talk about preserving Louisiana’s unique language. Below is a transcript of this week's Delta Dispatches ...
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‘Smell Detectives’: Meet the people who combated the stench of urban decay 14.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories
In “The Smell Detectives: An Olfactory History of Nineteenth-Century Urban America,” Melanie A. Kiechle follows those who tried to make sense of rapid growth of cities and what that did to public health.
Bridges and Roads Are as Important to Your Health as What's in Your Medicine Cabinet 14.8.2017 Truthout.com
Two seemingly unrelated national policy debates are afoot, and we can't adequately address one unless we address the other. Health care reform has been the hottest topic. What to do about America's aging infrastructure has been less animated but may be more pressing. Yet even as cracks in America's health system and infrastructure expand, political divides between parties and within parties have stalled efforts to develop policies and implement solutions. Problematically, debates over health care reform and infrastructure projects remain separate. As a professor of architecture who also studies health equity -- the establishment of systems, laws and environments that promote fair access to health care -- I believe we have reason to be concerned. What if a solution to bridging both the political and sectoral divides between health care and infrastructure was, literally, a bridge? Sure, bridges are core elements of infrastructure, but what do bridges have to do with health care? As it turns out, a ...
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"A Better Deal" for American Workers? Not Without Unions 13.8.2017 Truthout.com
A labor protest at Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, February 26, 2011. (Photo: sushiesque / Flickr ) At the Tufts Medical Center in Boston, 1,200 nurses recently walked off the job , initiating "the largest nurses' strike in Massachusetts's history and the first in Boston for 31 years." In New York, lawyers representing farmworkers recently argued in the State Supreme Court that they have a constitutional right to organize. In the Pacific Northwest, indigenous Oaxacan farm workers have organized the "first new farm worker union in the U.S. in a quarter century." In New York City, Fast Food Justice, a new nonprofit , will advocate for fast-food workers on issues affecting members, although they will be forbidden to undertake bargaining wage levels directly with employers. And in the South , "workers involved in the Southern Workers Assembly are ... focused on building a network of smaller minority unions that lack collective bargaining to create a groundswell of union support." These encouraging and ...
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University aims to educate 50,000 refugees worldwide by 2022 12.8.2017 AP National
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) -- Inspired by the success of a Southern New Hampshire University program that allows hundreds of refugees in Rwanda to access its courses, a group of anonymous donors approached its president with a challenge: What would it take to educate 50,000 refugees each year?...
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New York Becomes First City to Guarantee Lawyers to Tenants Facing Eviction 12.8.2017 Mother Jones
Randy Dillard is a single parent with five children in the Bronx. In 2013, he became so sick with emphysema he had to be hospitalized for about two months. Upon returning home, Dillard’s landlord served him eviction papers. “That’s when my nightmare began,” he tells Mother Jones. “When I first got the papers I didn’t […]
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Sponsored: Get outside and enjoy Seattle 11.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Some may feel like summer is winding down, but here in Seattle, there’s plenty left to squeeze out of the season.
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Addressing Women’s Burdens from Water Risks Could Help Reduce World Hunger 10.8.2017 WRI Stories
Addressing Women’s Burdens from Water Risks Could Help Reduce World HungerAdd Comment|PrintWomen face numerous difficulties caused by water insecurity. Flickr /ICRISAT For hundreds of millions of women, providing food to feed their families is a daily imperative. Many of them depend solely on the meager yields of small plots and farms, with little or no access to support when vital crops fail. At the same time, they shoulder the burden of household chores like fetching water, washing and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Yemen’s civil war turns country into cholera breeding ground 10.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Collapsing on sidewalks and constantly vomiting, some of the Yemeni villagers barely make it to the tiny health center where doctors spread carton sheets in the backyard and use trees to hang bags of IV fluids for patients. They are part of a stream of hundreds of suspected cholera victims that […]
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Does state funding for Medi-Cal discriminate against the Latinos it serves? 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Only about half of the non-emergency care doctors in California are willing to treat patients who are on Medi-Cal — the state’s version of Medicaid, the joint federal-state health insurance program for the poor and disabled — because the state pays them too little for their services. Yet the federal...

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Sponsored: Terminal 107 park: Hidden gem preserves past and future 9.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

A waterfront park, located along the Duwamish Waterway in South Elliott Bay, offers a window into Seattle’s history and a vision for a sustainable future. The Port of Seattle acquired this shoreline site in the late 1970s for industrial development. But the plans were waylaid when shells, bones of fish and birds, and cultural materials […]
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Jody Wynn stays upbeat despite some early challenges as new UW women’s basketball coach 8.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Wynn, who signed a six-year, $2.6 million deal that’ll pay her a base salary of $400,000 on April 14, has spent the summer getting acclimated to her new surroundings. There have been several surprises as well as a handful of setbacks.
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NYC mayor promotes millionaires’ tax to fix transit woes 8.8.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

NEW YORK (AP) — Mayor Bill de Blasio, flanked Monday by community activists, labor leaders and fellow Democratic politicians, officially rolled out a proposal for a millionaires’ tax to help fix the subways and aid low-income commuters. “People do not want to see this madness continue,” de Blasio declared, citing people getting work reprimands, picking […]
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L.A. is park poor. So why is one of the most beautiful green spaces in the city locked behind a fence? 7.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Los Angeles is woefully park poor. Less than half of L.A. County residents have easy access to a park, and three-quarters of the public spaces we do have are falling apart.

If those stats sound familiar, they should. City and county officials used them repeatedly in their successful effort to pass...

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Sheela Patel on the Urban Housing Crisis: Think Big, Act Local 7.8.2017 THE CITY FIX
From evictions and skyrocketing rents to substandard infrastructure and services, many residents in cities across the global south face acute housing challenges. And the problem is growing. According to estimates, one-in-three people in cities are unable to access affordable and ...
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Nonprofit installs solar panels on roofs of lower-income households — free 7.8.2017 Washington Post
Nonprofit installs solar panels on roofs of lower-income households — free
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Women Still Carry Most of the World's Water 5.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Imagine going through your day without access to clean, safe water in your home for drinking, cooking, washing or bathing whenever you need it. According to a new report from UNICEF and the World Health Organization , 2.1 billion people around the world face that challenge every day. And the task of providing water for households falls disproportionately to women and girls , especially in rural areas . Water, a human right , is critical for human survival and development. A sufficient supply of biologically and chemically safe water is necessary for drinking and personal hygiene to prevent diarrheal diseases , trachoma , intestinal worm infections , stunted growth among children and numerous other deleterious outcomes from chemical contaminants like arsenic and lead . I have carried out research in India , Bolivia and Kenya on the water and sanitation challenges that women and girls confront and how these experiences influence their lives. In my field work I have seen adolescent girls, pregnant women and ...
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Cookbook Author Crusades For Millions Of Kids Who Go Hungry In Summer 4.8.2017 NPR News
Good and Cheap writer Leanne Brown is teaming up with a national anti-hunger program to try to reach people who want help feeding their families healthy and affordable meals when school is out.
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