User: flenvcenter Topic: Transportation-National
Category: Multi-Modal Transportation :: Pedestrians
Last updated: Aug 01 2015 20:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In Michigan, a testing ground for a future of driverless cars 31.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Automakers and researchers are using a 32-acre fake city at the University of Michigan to simulate a real-world environment for autonomous vehicles. How will such cars affect urban planning?
In Michigan, A Testing Ground For A Future Of Driverless Cars 31.7.2015 NPR News
Automakers and researchers are using a 32-acre fake city at the University of Michigan to simulate a real-world environment for autonomous vehicles. How will such cars affect urban planning?
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Surviving Seattle’s sidewalks: Pedestrian rage rises as the population grows 30.7.2015 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
Instead of “After you. No, after you,” we have “Screw you!” as we encounter people who can’t see beyond their own electronics.
Cycling in Toronto: Why it sucks 30.7.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Chip in to keep stories like these coming. In advance of the Toronto premiere of Bikes vs. Cars  this Friday, I thought I would share this article I wrote about cycling in the ...
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What an F-16 Pilot Sees—and Misses 29.7.2015 Yahoo: Politics
For now I intend to wrap this discussion up, until the National Transportation Safety Board or other authorities offer additional facts or news, with two very interesting letters from experienced military flyers. Since retiring, I flew 2.5 years as a civilian contract F-15SG instructor [for another country’s Air Force], was a King Air 200 captain for Part 91 & 135 [non-commercial and charter] operations, and currently fly regional jets professionally. From a process perspective, as soon as there is an incident involving a USAF aircraft the service convenes up to two investigation boards depending on the severity of the incident.
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HUFFPOST HILL - Lincoln Chafee Speaks Softly And Carries Tiny Poll Numbers 29.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
President Obama joked that he could win if he ran for president again, as if he somehow doesn't realize Donald Trump is a major, huge candidate who is not only classy, but also creaming everyone in the polls. Chris Christie told Colorado pot smokers to enjoy legal weed while they can, because when he's president he will personally travel to Colorado and tell the state's pot laws to sit down and shut up. And Scott Walker couldn't decide which Philly cheesesteak place to visit, so he went to the two most famous ones and then couldn't finish his second sandwich. Truly, there are no second acts in American lives. This is HUFFPOST HILL for Tuesday, July 28th, 2015: HOUSE TO PASS SMARTCAR-SIZED HIGHWAY BILL - Laura Barron-Lopez: "In an effort to stave off a lapse in highway funding, House Republican leaders are pushing another bill through the chamber, but this time it will pay for the nation's transportation infrastructure for three months. The Highway Trust Fund, which on average accounts for over half of ...
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Poor training cited in Wisconsin skydivers midair collision 29.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The NTSB cited the lack of guidance from the Federal Aviation Administration on how pilots should fly formation flights with skydivers. Consequently, the NTSB said, the owner of the skydiving company 'did not provide its pilots skydiving formation flight training, and it did not keep records of pilot training nor was it required to do so by the FAA.'
Walkability, outdoor access may be key to luring talent to ‘burbs 28.7.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Walkability, outdoor access may be key to luring talent to ‘burbs
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Dogs trained to sniff out bombers on the move 28.7.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
For many years, dogs were trained to find homemade bombs planted in a parked car or stashed in a village bazaar. That focus changed when scientists and trainers were faced with a new challenge: how to detect such a bomb that is on the move, carried by a would-be bomber.
Comments on Southwest LRT's latest environmental impact statement reveal lingering concerns about safety 27.7.2015 MinnPost
While Minneapolis officials were trying to preserve a $13 million bicycle bridge that would separate the Cedar Lake Trail from tracks for the proposed Southwest Light Rail Transit project, the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board was wondering if that was such a good idea. The bridge, ultimately removed from the proposed Southwest LRT plan as a cost saving measure, would have taken trail riders and pedestrians up and over freight and light rail trains near where the Cedar Lake and Kenilworth trails join, just north of the Kenilworth Corridor. “The MPRB believes this structure poses the potential for a significant visual impact on the setting of Cedar Lake Park due to its length and height,” the board noted. The comment is part of a lengthy response by the park board to the draft supplemental environmental impact statement (DSEIS) for the Southwest LRT project — one of more than 200 responses submitted to the Met Council before the official comment period ended July 21. The Southwest LRT project staff will ...
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San Francisco's Chinatown clings to roots amid tech boom 26.7.2015 Yahoo: US National
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — For a century and a half, San Francisco's Chinatown, the nation's oldest, has sheltered waves of immigrants seeking a new ...
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25 years after the ADA, sidewalks still speak louder than words 24.7.2015 MinnPost
Courtesy of Melody Hoffmann Imagine that you’re in a wheelchair on Franklin. How would you get around? Next time you’re walking around town, stop and look at the sidewalk under your feet. Notice the cracks, the curbs, the placement of poles. Now imagine that you’re in a wheelchair. How would you get around? For people with full mobility — legs, eyes, and arms at full strength — it’s all too easy to forget about thousands of Minnesotans with disabilities. But 25 years after the passage of the landmark Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), the effect of the federal legislation on city streets still leaves a lot to be desired. With results on the ground lagging behind the equity rhetoric, advocates are brainstorming new ways to improve Twin Cities sidewalks. How has the ADA changed the city? “Tons of stuff that for sure have improved, but you always have to keep your eye on these things,” Rick Cardenas told me this week. Anyone in St. Paul working on disability issues knows Cardenas, who has spent decades ...
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In Helping Those With Disabilities, ADA Improves Access For All 24.7.2015 NPR: Morning Edition
Take a tour through New York and you'll see how the 25-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act is benefiting everyone.
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RELEASE: Report Provides Urban Design Recommendations for Healthier Cities, Fewer Traffic Fatalities 23.7.2015 WRI Stories
RELEASE: Report Provides Urban Design Recommendations for Healthier Cities, Fewer Traffic FatalitiesJuly 23, 2015 Guide for urban planners and policymakers details specific design elements with examples from Tokyo, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Istanbul, New York City, Paris and moreRead more [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Cities Safer by Design 23.7.2015 WRI Stories
Cities Safer by Design is a global reference guide to help cities save lives from traffic fatalities through improved street design and smart urban development. Over 1.3 million people die in traffic crashes globally, mostly pedestrians, and that number is growing every year. This hands-on guide taps examples from cities worldwide and includes 34 different design elements to improve safety and quality of life. This report is made possible through funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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How to Make Cities Safer by Design 23.7.2015 WRI Stories
Traffic crashes claim 1.28 million each year, and will be the world’s fifth-largest cause of death by 2030 unless we improve road safety. The impact of these crashes falls disproportionally on cities in the developing world, with 90 percent of all deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In Sao Paulo, more than 1,300 people die from traffic crashes every year; in Delhi, it’s more than 1,500. While those who use the roads have historically been seen as responsible for these... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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7 Proven Principles for Designing a Safer City 23.7.2015 WRI Stories
Traffic crashes kill more than 1.2 million people every year, nearly the same amount that die from HIV/AIDS. But there’s an undervalued approach to making the world’s roads safer—good urban design. While most traffic safety initiatives tend to focus on behavioral approaches—such as helmet- and seatbelt-wearing campaigns—a new publication from the EMBARQ sustainable mobility initiative of WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities finds that seven design principles can help cities dramatically... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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7 Proven Principles for Designing a Safer City 23.7.2015 THE CITY FIX
Traffic accidents kill more than 1.2 million people every year, nearly the same amount that die from HIV/AIDS. But there’s an undervalued approach to making the world’s roads safer—good urban design. While most traffic safety initiatives tend to focus on ...
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How to Make Cities Safer by Design 23.7.2015 THE CITY FIX
Traffic crashes claim 1.28 million each year, and will be the world’s fifth-largest cause of death by 2030 unless we improve road safety. The impact of these crashes falls disproportionally on cities in the developing world, with 90 percent of ...
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Testing out new bridge near Husky Stadium 23.7.2015 Seattle Times: Local
The $13 million bridge is part of a $43 million rebuild of the UW’s Rainier Vista triangle, which includes a landscaped promenade from UW Medical Center up to the main campus.
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