User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Wells
Last updated: Jul 06 2015 20:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 32,214    
California Inc.: Why California's gasoline costs more 6.7.2015 LA Times: Top News
Also found in: [+]
California drought forces agency to rethink West’s water system 6.7.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
As snow disappears, experts say the Bureau of Reclamation — created in 1902 — must completely rebuild a 20th-century infrastructure so that it can efficiently conserve and distribute water in a 21st-century warming world.
Also found in: [+]
California’s rural poor hit hardest as groundwater vanishes in long drought 6.7.2015 Washington Post
MECCA, Calif. — Whenever her sons rush indoors after playing under the broiling desert sun, Guadalupe Rosales worries. They rarely heed her constant warning: Don’t drink the water. It’s not safe. The 8- and 10-year-olds stick their mouths under a kitchen faucet and gulp anyway.Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
China's move toward restricting foreign NGOs spurs anxiety in many organizations 5.7.2015 L.A. Times - World News
When a massive earthquake struck Nepal in April, Chinese nongovernmental organizations rushed in to provide help, making camp on the grounds of the national palace museum and distributing water, food and tents.
Also found in: [+]
African immigrant communities making St. Paul feel a little more like home 4.7.2015 Pioneer Press: Most Viewed

From a former medical clinic within St. Paul's Bandana Square, members of Minnesota's Cameroonian community organize a Scrabble tournament, lawn tennis and career mentoring programs while debating the fractious politics of their home country.

Also found in: [+]
Read The Best July Fourth Oration Ever Given 4.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In 1852, the abolitionist Frederick Douglass delivered what could be considered the best July Fourth oration ever given. In an address to the Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society of Rochester, New York, he heralded the great strides America had made up to that point but also warned that freedom was and would continue to be a work in progress. Read the whole speech below (text courtesy of the University of Rochester Frederick Douglass Project ). He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my ability, than I do this day. A feeling has crept over me, quite unfavorable to the exercise of my limited powers of speech. The task before me is one which requires much previous thought and study for its proper performance. I know that apologies of this sort are generally considered flat and unmeaning. I trust, however, that mine will not be so ...
Also found in: [+]
Papal visit puts Andes presidents' eco-record under scrutiny 4.7.2015 World
AGUARAGUE NATIONAL PARK, Bolivia (AP) — In the vine-entangled forests of the Aguarague National Park, crude that seeped for decades out of abandoned wellheads saturates the soil and has stained the bedrock of creeks that provide water to the indigenous Guarani who live ...
Also found in: [+]
Papal visit puts Andes presidents' eco-record under scrutiny 4.7.2015 AP Top News
AGUARAGUE NATIONAL PARK, Bolivia (AP) -- In the vine-entangled forests of the Aguarague National Park, crude that seeped for decades out of abandoned wellheads saturates the soil and has stained the bedrock of creeks that provide water to the indigenous Guarani who live nearby....
Also found in: [+]
St. Paul Hmong sports festival may be largest yet 3.7.2015 Pioneer Press: Most Viewed

Tens of thousands of Hmong from across the world are expected to gather this weekend in St. Paul's Como Park for the annual summer sports festival.

Also found in: [+]
Is Silicon Valley Charting the Future While All the World's Pols Play Small Ball? 3.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"It is dangerous to mix godlike technology with megalomaniac politics but it might be even more dangerous to blend godlike technology with myopic politics. Our politics is becoming mere administration and is giving up on the future exactly when technology gives us the power to reshape that future beyond our wildest dreams. Indeed, technology gives us the power to start reshaping even our dreams. If politicians don't want the job of planning this future, they will merely be handing it on a platter to somebody else." Professor Yuval Harari As we contemplate our present and future around the 239th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, are we being myopic? Is our politics focused mainly on marginalia while real change, big change, is being prepped elsewhere? In a cover story late last month in the usually intriguing British magazine New Statesman, entitled "Who Owns the Future?: The Silicon Valley Prophets And A Runaway World," Israeli historian Yuval Harari argues that, following a 20th century ...
Also found in: [+]
EPA's New Fracking Study: A Close Look at the Numbers Buried in the Fine Print 3.7.2015 Truthout.com
When EPA's long-awaited draft assessment on fracking and drinking water supplies was released, the oil and gas industry triumphantly focused on a headline-making sentence: "We did not find evidence of widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States." But for fracking's backers, a sense of victory may prove to be fleeting. EPA's draft assessment made one thing clear: fracking has repeatedly contaminated drinking water supplies (a fact that the industry has long aggressively denied). Indeed, the federal government's recognition that fracking can contaminate drinking water supplies may prove to have opened the floodgates, especially since EPA called attention to major gaps in the official record, due in part to gag orders for landowners who settle contamination claims and in part because there simply hasn't been enough testing to know how widespread problems have become. And although it's been less than a month since EPA's draft assessment was released, the evidence on ...
Also found in: [+]
Officials to begin lifting evacuation after train derailment 3.7.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
Preparations began Friday to allow thousands of eastern Tennessee residents to return to their homes after a CSX train car carrying hazardous material derailed and caught fire.
Also found in: [+]
Catholic Colleges In No Rush To Divest From Fossil Fuels After Pope's Encyclical 3.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Students at Catholic universities across the United States are hoping the pope's encyclical on the environment , which lays out a moral argument for addressing climate change, will help them persuade their schools to drop investments in fossil fuel. “We know that technology based on the use of highly polluting fossil fuels -- especially coal, but also oil and, to a lesser degree, gas -- needs to be progressively replaced without delay,” Pope Francis wrote in his June 18 encyclical. He pointed to an “urgent need to develop policies so that, in the next few years, the emission of carbon dioxide and other highly polluting gases can be drastically reduced, for example, substituting for fossil fuels and developing sources of renewable energy.” Student campaigns for divestment were already underway at the very wealthiest Catholic universities in the U.S. But so far, not a single American Catholic college or university has announced plans to divest in light of the encyclical. Of the three ...
Also found in: [+]
Cities' food supplies are eating into groundwater reserves, study finds 3.7.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Groundwater in America's major aquifers is being used up way faster than it's being replenished. But where does all that water go?
Also found in: [+]
Pact with devil? California farmers use oil firms' water 3.7.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
Driving into the parched region around Bakersfield, in the western US state's fertile Central Valley, it is evident how closely the agriculture and oil industries are related. Eighty percent of the state's oil production and 45 percent of the farming industry is concentrated in a single county, Kern County, said Madeline Stano of the Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment. In a bid to diversify supplies, the Cawelo Water District, a cooperative financed by local farmers, has for 20 years used waste water from oil ...
Also found in: [+]
BP to pay record $18.7 billion to states affected by spill 3.7.2015 Yahoo: US National
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than five years after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history fouled beaches, coated seabirds in thick goo and threatened delicate marshes, BP has agreed to pay a record settlement to affected states in hopes of bringing an end to a legal drama that has cost the company ...
Also found in: [+]
Denver-based energy company proposes water plan 3.7.2015 Durango Herald
DENVER – A Denver-based energy company with plans to operate in the San Juan Basin has proposed a water plan to the state to replace depletions to the Pine River system as a result of coal-bed methane development.Catamount Energy Partners owns four wells that withdraw groundwater flows to the Pine River from the Fruitland...
Also found in: [+]
A milestone for the environment in the Deepwater Horizon disaster 3.7.2015 Washington Post: Editorials
THE SAGA of what some have called the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history passed a milestone on Thursday. BP, the company in charge of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig that exploded a mile above the Gulf of Mexico seafloor five years ago, announced that it has reached a comprehensive agreement with the federal government, as well as the states and the municipalities that were affected by the 3 million barrels of oil that gushed into the water. Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
U.S., European Regulators, the Pope Agree: Time to Re-assess Pesticide Risks 3.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We know a lot about glyphosate, the pesticide widely known as Roundup. We know it kills the only food of the monarch caterpillar, linking it to nearly a 90 percent decline in monarch butterflies over the past two decades. We know that a report released by the World Health Organization in March links it to cancer. We know the Netherlands has banned over-the-counter sales of it. We know this month, France did the same. And this week, in response to a lawsuit filed by the conservation group where I work, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency agreed for the first time to analyze how 1,500 endangered plants and animals are impacted by Roundup and atrazine -- the two most commonly used pesticides in the world -- as well as well as two other pesticides similar to atrazine. Despite the many known risks associated with all four toxins, hundreds of millions of pounds of them are dumped on U.S. fields and gardens every year. So a fair response would be to ask why the EPA wasn't already assessing those risks. The ...
Also found in: [+]
Researcher Discovers Groundwater Modeling Breakthrough 2.7.2015 Environmental News Network
A University of Wyoming professor has made a discovery that answers a nearly 100-year-old question about water movement, with implications for agriculture, hydrology, climate science and other fields.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 32,214