User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Wells
Last updated: Sep 03 2014 05:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Clean Power Plan to Reward Texas, not Wyoming Coal-Backers 3.9.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jim Marston Source: Aurora Lights Chronicle readers would be forgiven if they opened their papers last weekend and thought it was 2005. That’s because the Koch brothers-funded Texas Public Policy Foundation published an editorial that echoed the pro-coal rhetoric we heard nearly 10 years ago when then-TXU wanted to build new power plants across Texas that would burn Wyoming coal. Sure, this weekend’s piece had a different news hook – the new Clean Power Plan that will require Texas to reduce carbon emissions from power plants like every other state. But TPPF’s conclusion was the same: better, cleaner technology is bad and coal is king. As Yogi Berra would have said, “It’s like déjà vu all over again.” Texas is the number one carbon emitter in the U.S. and power plants, together, are the largest emitters. Our state represents close to 10 percent of the entire nation’s carbon emissions. The Clean Power Plan will simply require Texas to adhere to the rules all other states have to follow. I love Texas ...
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Mercury News editorial: Governor should sign historic groundwater bill 3.9.2014 San Jose Mercury News: Editorials
The package of bills gives the state a crucial tool in the fight to ensure a long-term adequate water supply
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Clean Power Plan to Reward State, not Wyoming Coal-Backers 3.9.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jim Marston Source: Aurora Lights Chronicle readers would be forgiven if they opened their papers last weekend and thought it was 2005. That’s because the Koch brothers-funded Texas Public Policy Foundation published an editorial that echoed the pro-coal rhetoric we heard nearly 10 years ago when then-TXU wanted to build new power plants across Texas that would burn Wyoming coal. Sure, this weekend’s piece had a different news hook – the new Clean Power Plan that will require Texas to reduce carbon emissions from power plants like every other state. But TPPF’s conclusion was the same:  better, cleaner technology is bad and coal is king. As Yogi Berra would have said, “It’s like déjà vu all over again.” Texas is the number one carbon emitter in the U.S. and power plants, together, are the largest emitters. Our state represents close to 10 percent of the entire nation’s carbon emissions.  The Clean Power Plan will simply require Texas to adhere to the rules all other states have to follow. I love Texas ...
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Desmond Hague, Puppy-Kicking CEO, Ousted From Job (GRAPHIC VIDEO) 3.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The multimillionaire who was caught on camera abusing a puppy is being replaced as CEO of Centerplate. Desmond Hague has managed the Connecticut-based multibillion-dollar sports catering company since 2009. Last month, the Global News obtained surveillance footage of Hague in a Vancouver elevator kicking Sade, a 1-year-old Doberman Pinscher, and violently dragging her around by her leash. (WARNING: GRAPHIC VIDEO) Hague apologized for the incident in a public statement, calling the abuse “completely and utterly out of character.” Centerplate released its own statement on Aug. 27, informing the public that Hague would be required to serve 1,000 hours of community service and donate $100,000 towards the creation of an organization dedicated to protecting animals. The statement was met with public backlash, including a Change.org petition with 180,000 signatures demanding that that Centerplate fire Hague. On Tuesday, Centerplate announced that Hague would be replaced by Chris Verros, Fortune reported. From ...
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Seafood Watch cites dramatic turnaround in rockfish, other West Coast fish 3.9.2014 LA Times: Top News
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Politicians Show Their Gratitude Where It Count$ 2.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Hubert The Dog Has Been Waiting A Long Time For His New Home, But Don't Give Up On Him Yet 2.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You could understand it if Hubert the dog, or the shelter where he lives, had given up hope by now of finding this guy a family of his own. Luckily, they haven't. As of Labor Day, it's been 373 days of shelter living for this guy, as you can see on the sign that the Milton Animal League affixed to his cage over the weekend. "Hubert was found running on a street in Milton, Massachusetts, and was taken in by a resident who called the shelter," MAL volunteer Maura Porter and animal control officer Nancy Bersani told HuffPost by email. In the year-plus since, this guy has shown himself to be a "cuddle bug" who loves people, say Porter and Bersani -- which makes his situation vexing, if still understandable. "There are so many rescue and animals groups now and many of those have huge followings -- as a result shelters, especially smaller municipal shelters, are sometimes overlooked," Porter and Bersani explain. "That and the fact that Hubert is part American pit bull terrier and has some restrictions for an ...
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100 years later, have we learned from the passenger pigeon's extinction? 2.9.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/cotinis It's been 100 years since the last passenger pigeon disappeared from the skies. Monday was a sad anniversary in the history of American wildlife conservation, marking the centennial of the passenger pigeon's extinction. We don't usually know the date of a species' passing with such precision, but in this case it's well established as Sept. 1, 1914, because the last living pigeon was an inmate of the Cincinnati Zoo at the time of her demise. She was called Martha, after the nation's first First Lady, and may have reached the advanced age of 29, according to a fine piece in a recent Audubon magazine, despite "a palsy that made her tremble. Not once in her life had she laid a fertile egg." Because I grew up in the latter 1900s, I long assumed that the passenger pigeon had been erased on purpose as an agricultural pest, like the gray wolf, or as collateral damage in other pest control, like the DDT-beset bald eagle. But that was conflating a newer kind of tragic narrative with an older one: ...
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Halliburton To Pay $1.1 Billion Settlement Over Gulf Oil Spill 2.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

HOUSTON (AP) — Halliburton says it has agreed to pay $1.1 billion to settle a substantial portion of plaintiff claims arising from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.


The settlement, which is subject to court approval, will be paid into a trust until appeals are resolved over the next two years.


Halliburton was BP PLC's cement contractor on the drilling rig that exploded in the Gulf in April 2010, killing 11 workers and triggering the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.


The deal will settle claims assigned to Halliburton as a result of BP's settlement in 2012 and punitive damages from the loss of property or commercial fishing activity resulting from the oil spill.

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LAPD Infiltrators and Agents Provocateurs Targeted Left and Panthers 2.9.2014 Truthout.com
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China's Shale Gas Plans Limited By Water Shortages, Report Finds 2.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BEIJING (AP) — More than 60 percent of China's vast shale gas deposits are in regions with scarce water resources, complicating plans by the energy-hungry country to tap the natural gas, according to a U.S.-based research group. The World Resources Institute said China has the world's largest reserves of natural gas trapped in deep shale rock but most of it is in arid areas such as deserts or regions where farming and industry already stress water resources. Commonly known as fracking, shale gas mining requires pumping large quantities of water mixed with chemicals into deep wells to break apart shale rock. The institute said in a report issued Tuesday that 38 percent of the world's shale gas deposits are in areas with scarce water. China, Argentina and Algeria have the world's biggest shale gas deposits. China is seeking to tap its shale gas deposits to help power a growing economy and move away from polluting coal-fired energy plants. Yet the country is also suffering its worst drought in half a ...
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Plastic Bags, Nuclear Waste and a Toxic Planet 2.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week we saw California move a step closer to banning one-time use plastic bags and the Federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission legalize above ground storage of nuclear waste. What's the connection? Every once in a while I think it is useful to turn aside from the deeply rooted, but relatively straightforward problem of climate change, to the growing use of uncontrolled toxic substances in our daily economic life. The toxicity of our environment may well be more difficult to address than the problem of climate change. The use of toxics in the goods we consume is so widespread that when firefighters enter a modern home that is burning, they must wear breathing devices for protection from the toxicity of the fumes that emanate from our burning floors, appliances, and walls. Household toxics are dangerous, but nothing compared to nuclear waste. Nuclear waste is one of the most toxic substances we have ever fabricated, always bringing to mind the late Barry Commoner's common sense statement that nuclear ...
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Meet Xander The Cat, Who Was A Test Subject In A Lab Before Becoming A Pet 2.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
You know those tearjerking videos of beagles rescued from research labs, walking on grass for the first time ? Xander the cat -- known as Jax at the time of his rescue -- has one of those, too. Saved from his former life as a lab test subject, Xander now lives with a loving owner and has found his place among a her small family of rescue cats. Here is Xander (formerly Jax) in his first moments of freedom after leaving the lab. He is seen in this video along with another rescue cat, a mostly white feline named Shira. "Xander was legally rescued from a lab in New York, on the condition of anonymity, by Beagle Freedom Project in January 2014," says Rachel Gruen, his new owner. "He lived in a windowless lab in a tiny wire cage for the first three years of his life, and he was done being a test subject." A lab employee had contacted the Project about Xander, so that he wouldn't be euthanized at the end of his tests. Gruen happened to see a link to the group's cat rescue page while "browsing around a ...
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Report: Water shortages crimp China shale gas plan 2.9.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
BEIJING (AP) — More than 60 percent of China's vast shale gas deposits are in regions with scarce water resources, complicating plans by the energy-hungry country to tap the natural gas, according to a U.
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Report: Water shortages crimp China shale gas plan 2.9.2014 World
BEIJING (AP) — More than 60 percent of China's vast shale gas deposits are in regions with scarce water resources, complicating plans by the energy-hungry country to tap the natural gas, according to a U.S.-based research group.
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Report says water shortages complicate China's plans to tap enormous shale gas reserves 2.9.2014 Star Tribune: World
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40 Percent of Countries with Largest Shale Energy Resources Face Water Stress 2.9.2014 WRI Stories
Right now, dozens of countries around the world are deciding whether or not to develop their shale gas and tight oil resources (tight oil deposits are trapped in fine-grained sedimentary rock, including shale). It’s easy to understand why: shale gas could boost the world’s recoverable natural gas resources by 47 percent, cut greenhouse gas emissions compared to coal, create new revenue and jobs, and raise national energy supplies. However, extracting natural gas and tight oil from shale poses environmental risks , especially when it comes to water. Hydraulic fracturing requires up to 25 million liters of fresh water per well, meaning shale resources can be hard to develop where fresh water is hard to find—including in some of the world’s fastest-growing economies and populations. Water stress at shale plays around the world. 20 labeled countries have the world’s largest technically recoverable shale gas resources. Circle color indicates average water stress level across a country’s shale plays—circle ...
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All fat is bad for you? Well, not so fast 2.9.2014 Twincities.com: Nation

People who avoid carbohydrates and eat more fat, even saturated fat, lose more body fat and have fewer cardiovascular risks than people who follow the low-fat diet that health authorities have favored for decades, a major new study shows.

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West metro cities at odds over future of woodsy dog park 2.9.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
Minneapolis hopes to sell parcel to Edina or St. Louis Park – for at least $1.5M.
Minneapolis, Edina and St. Louis Park at odds over future of woodsy dog park 2.9.2014 Star Tribune: Local
Minneapolis hopes to sell parcel to Edina or St. Louis Park – for at least $1.5M.
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