User: irge304 Topic: Energy Extraction
Category: Coal Mining
Last updated: Aug 28 2015 22:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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World's biggest coal port joins fossil fuel divestment push 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Newcastle is the seventh council in Australia to announce it will shun fossil fuels, reports the Sydney Morning Herald

Newcastle city council in Australia has voted to exit holdings in the big four banks if they continue to fund fossil fuel projects. About 80% of the Australian city of Newcastle council’s $270m investment portfolio is held in the big four banks, mostly through term deposits. Those investments are spread evenly across the big four.

But after the council passed a motion on Tuesday, six votes to five, it will dump holdings in the banks for more “environmentally and socially responsible” institutions when deposits come up for renewal.

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Beautiful Northumberland, off the beaten track 28.8.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Author Ann Cleeves describes the draw of her native Northumberland – and the parts most visitors miss in its former industrial corner. Plus more lovely but quiet bits of Britain Best seafood restaurants on the Northumberland coast Northumberland is a wild and beautiful place. Tourists visit for the history, for the hills and the wide, empty beaches. They drive west to Hexham and Hadrian’s Wall or north to Alnwick and Holy Island, but they usually ignore the coastal plain in the south east corner of the county where once coal was mined and ships built. If you take the Spine Road – the A189 from Newcastle – and look out over the flat farmland towards the sea, the view is almost entirely industrial. You see the chimneys of the power station that used to provide energy for the Alcan smelter, a giant offshore wind farm and the cranes at Blyth Docks. But nature is taking over again, now the heavy industry has retreated. The subsidence pools and the recently planted reed beds just inland from the dunes at ...
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Run for your lives, climate campaigners are sophisticated and can tie their own shoelaces 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Coal lobbyists think Australians should be shocked that climate campaigners have strategies and are coordinated

Before I reveal some chilling truths about environmental campaigners, you’d best grab your nearest cuddly toy and take refuge behind the sofa.

As government ministers, conservative commentators and coal lobbyists have warned us in recent days, the greenies are coming.

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Colowyo and Trapper continue to sift through legal woes 28.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
On May 8, federal district Judge R. Brooke Jackson ordered the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement to redo its environmental assessment for Colowyo Coal Mine within 120 days, threatening to stop work if the process was not completed by the deadline As OSMRE approaches its Sept. 6 deadline, Craig and Moffat County are faced with a pivotal moment in the future of the area’s economy. Although the situation at Colowyo may be approaching resolution, Trapper Mine, which was originally spared from a remedial assessment in Jackson’s ruling, has been thrown back into the ring and will likely be subject to an OSMRE redo. What happens when the deadline hits? Bob Postle, program support division manager for OSMRE’s Western Region, said the assessment is scheduled to meet the deadline. Sometime in the first week of September, OSMRE will issue a Finding of No Significant Impact — meaning a more complicated Environmental Impact Statement does not need to be drafted. Next, the Secretary of the ...
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Don't believe the hype. Coal employs fewer people than McDonald's | Ben Oquist 28.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
If Tony Abbott wants to focus on jobs, he has to abandon his obsession with coal – a capital intensive industry that creates fewer jobs than the horse industry The prime minister has repeatedly said that the next election should be about jobs. He has attempted to kick-start a new “economy versus environment” strategy in relation to a coal mining. According to the ABS a huge 0.3% of Australians are currently employed in coal mining. If the coal industry trebled in size tomorrow it still wouldn’t be enough to create jobs for the extra 101,900 people who have become unemployed since Tony Abbott became prime minister. Anyone who has ever seen an open cut coal mine will understand why they don’t create a lot of jobs. Work that was once done by men with picks and shovels is now done by explosives and enormous machines. Economists call such industries “capital intensive” which is another way of saying “doesn’t create many ...
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The day we stopped Europe’s biggest polluter in its tracks | John Jordan 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
Earlier this month, 1,500 protesters forced the temporary closure of a vast lignite mine in Germany. It was terrifiyng, exhilarating – and direct action at its best This month, I broke the law. I wasn’t alone; I was with 1,500 others, many of whom had never broken any law for their beliefs before. Together we managed to shut down Europe’s biggest source of CO2 emissions : RWE’s lignite mines in the Rhineland in Germany. In total, around 800 of us were arrested, and hundreds of us refused to cooperate with the authorities by withholding our names and IDs. This hampered the bureaucracy so badly that we were released without charge. It was the world’s largest act of disobedience against the mining of fossil fuels – and it might be the spark that ignites a rising, cross-border movement of disobedience for climate ...
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What will happen to oil and gas workers as the world turns carbon neutral? 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Building a wind farm or solar energy project is nothing professionals in fossil fuels can’t manage, but there are too few programmes to help them retrain

Adriaan Kamp used to be a die-hard oilman. After 17 years at Anglo-Dutch oil company Shell, the 54-year-old Dutchman now runs a consultancy based in Oslo advising national governments on transitioning to cleaner energy.

“In 2007 to 2008, we were looking at future energy scenarios in the Shell Group [and] there was a question on my desk about how do we play with renewables,” he says. “And from there, the journey started.”

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Behind the commodities bust 26.8.2015 Washington Post: Op-Eds
First was the dot-com bubble, then the housing bubble. Now comes the commodities bubble. We don’t fully understand the stock market’s current turmoil, but we know it’s driven at least in part by a bubble of raw material prices. Their collapse weighs on world stock markets through fears of slower economic growth and large financial losses.Read full article ...
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Mining stocks drive FTSE 100 rebound 25.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

BHP Billiton leads peers higher after world’s biggest miner promises to slash spending to shore up dividends

Mining stocks that were hammered on Black Monday clawed back some ground on Tuesday after major companies announced cost cuts that are likely to preserve expected dividend payouts.

Shares in BHP Billiton jumped by 5.5% to £10.21 – despite the world’s biggest miner reporting a 52% slump in annual profits to a decade low – after the group said it would slash spending to shore up dividends.

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BHP profits tumble as China slows 25.8.2015 BBC: Business
Annual profits at BHP Billiton slid 86% despite slashing costs, as a collapse in Chinese demand for commodities hit the mining giant.
Emerging Markets Take a Hit 25.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: Page One
Emerging Markets Take a Hit

Bad news from China has sparked a firestorm in the developing countries that feed its vast industrial machine, leaving a swath of economies with few good ways to escape a crunch.

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Mining Shares Sink Deep 24.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Shares in major mining companies took a hammering Monday as concern grew over the health of China, the biggest buyer of commodities from copper to iron ore.
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Native Americans’ totem pole travels to oppose coal-export terminals 22.8.2015 Seattle Times: Local
A tribe is transporting a totem pole through the Northwest to protest coal- export terminals.
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Native Americans' totem pole journeys to oppose coal exports 22.8.2015 AP Washington
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- A Native American tribe is taking a 22-foot totem pole from Canada through the Pacific Northwest to Montana in opposition of proposed coal export terminals....
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Private dinners, lavish parties and shoulder rubbing. How coal giant Adani charmed Australia's political elite 21.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Reports from trade missions show the lengths to which Indian mining billionaire Gautam Adani has gone to charm ministers and state Premiers.

Why is it that for so long and under such extreme pressure, Australian political leaders of both dominant stripes have stood by one of the most controversial coal projects in the country’s history?

The project in question is the Carmichael coal mine – a $16 billion (or so) plan for Queensland’s Galilee Basin being endlessly proposed by Indian company Adani.

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Wellcome Trust loses millions as its fossil fuel investments plunge in value 20.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
Medical charity sold off two-thirds of its investments in Shell but lost an estimated £175m in the last year due to falling share prices in the fossil fuel sector The Wellcome Trust’s investments in fossil fuel companies have lost an estimated £175m in the last year, due to sharp falls in share prices. Research by the Guardian shows the medical charity has sold off two-thirds of its holding in Shell but also increased its investment in the fastest falling of its stocks, mining giant BHP Billiton, by 8%. The Wellcome Trust is the world’s second-biggest non-governmental funder of medical research but has been the focus of a Guardian campaign asking the Trust to sell its fossil fuel investments, which today stand at an estimated ...
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Cheese It, It's the Man: Videos of Russia's Food Cops Go Viral 20.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: Page One
Cheese It, It’s the Man: Videos of Russia’s Food Cops Go Viral

Russia’s food inspectors have leapt into action to enforce Vladimir Putin’s decree to destroy Western victuals eluding an embargo. The results: viral Internet videos of cheese raids, calamari incinerations and smashed frozen geese.

MOSCOW—The inspector arrived at a warehouse in the Russian coal-mining city of Kemerovo on a mission of highest priority to the Kremlin: To confiscate and destroy 93 pounds42 kilograms of forbidden Spanish calamari.

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Bad Bets Sock Mining Giant 20.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: Page One
Bad Bets Sock Mining Giant

Glencore shares tumble as falling commodity prices and trading struggles alarm investors

LONDON—A year ago, Glencore PLC Chief Executive Ivan Glasenberg was plotting his next big deal: a proposed $150 billion merger with rival miner Rio Tinto PLC, just as the ink was drying on his $29.5 billion deal for Xstrata.

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Adani poised to submit third plan for dredging in Great Barrier Reef 20.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Queensland mining minister set to announce Abbot Point environmental impact statement complete, putting Adani closer to submitting plan to Greg Hunt

The latest version of Adani’s controversial plan to dredge in Great Barrier Reef waters to expand its Queensland coal port is poised to go before federal environment minister Greg Hunt for approval.

Guardian Australia understands Queensland mining minister Anthony Lynham will announce on Thursday that an environmental impact statement on the Abbot Point port expansion is complete, opening the way for an application to Hunt.

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Coal mining sector running out of time, says Citigroup 19.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Industry unlikely to pick up without advances in carbon capture technology as governments seek to drive down emissions, banking giant warns. RTCC reports

US banking giant Citigroup says the global coal industry is set for further pain, predicting an acceleration of mine closures, liquidations and bankruptcies.

The value of listed coal companies monitored by Citi has shrunk from $50bn (£32bn) in 2012 to $18bn in 2015, a trend it believes will continue.

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