User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Indigenous People
Last updated: May 23 2017 01:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump's plans to cut food stamps could hit his supporters hardest 23.5.2017 Washington Post
There is growing anticipation that the budget to be unveiled Tuesday could incorporate proposals which would eliminate or curtail waivers to adults who live in areas where few jobs are available.
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Billionaire makes 'biggest philanthropic gift' by living Australian 22.5.2017 BBC: Business
Billionaire Andrew Forrest and his wife, Nicola, will give A$400m (£229m; $298m) to charity.
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Brazil’s lower house OKs reducing protection in Amazon park 18.5.2017 Washington Post: World
Brazil’s lower house of Congress has approved a measure significantly reducing the size of a fully protected national park in the Amazon rain forest and opening up a big chunk of land for agriculture and other activities.
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South America's indigenous groups used to line up with the left. Not anymore. 12.5.2017 Washington Post
South America's indigenous groups used to line up with the left. Not anymore.
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Power Minister Goyal emphasises on promoting indigenous solar equipment manufacturing 12.5.2017 New Kerala: World News
Power Minister Goyal emphasises on promoting indigenous solar equipment manufacturing
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Trump takes aim at monuments with oil riches 11.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Bears Ears National Monument in Utah boasts stretches of red-and-yellow sandstone so brilliant they appear to be ablaze and rock structures so precarious they appear to defy gravity. The rugged terrain south of the Colorado River also has reserves of oil and natural gas that are currently off limits to new leasing — restrictions that may end as the Trump administration reviews 27 large-scale monuments his predecessors set aside for protection. Industry groups and Republican lawmakers have praise... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Reviving debate over Bears Ears National Monument also revives racial tension in a remote corner of Utah 10.5.2017 LA Times: Nation

The debate over the best use of these vast canyonlands is not just about states’ rights or who should control public land. Nor is it only about environmental protection or the preservation of Native American culture.

It is also about the people who have lived alongside each other in this remote...

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A Monumental Cave-In 5.5.2017 American Prospect
Bureau of Land Management/Public Domain Indian Creek and Cliffside, Bears Ears National Monument On his first day on the job in Washington, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke rode to his new office on a National Park Service horse. Next week, he heads to Utah for another horse-powered photo op through the tougher terrain of the Bears Ears, which President Obama designated a national monument. “I'm going to ride a horse, like Teddy Roosevelt, and see the land and talk to the Navajo and the nations of tribes,” Zinke said . The trip is part of Zinke’s review of large-area national monument designations made under presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama (although Bush established just four of the 24 monuments.). Theodore Roosevelt would likely be outraged by the underlying mission—scaling back the monuments—that Zinke has been tapped to carry out as he trots along on whatever trusty steed his Utah hosts rustle up for him.   Zinke’s boss, President Donald Trump, recently signed an executive order ...
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Letter: We can't 'grab' land we already own 3.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
I spent time recently roaming the newly designated Bears Ears National Monument. I have never wandered more beautiful lands anywhere. These lands, sacred to many Native American peoples, should also be sacred to us, the late-invading settlers. When I read the commentary by Sen. Orrin Hatch suggesting the establishment of the new monument was a “land grab,” I found his words inflammatory and derogatory. It is simply impossible for the United States government to “grab” lands we already own. Thes...
This Year's May Day Protests Aren't Just About Labor 30.4.2017 Mother Jones
Following the election of Donald Trump, groups affiliated with the Black Lives Matter movement set out to expand their focus beyond criminal justice issues and build partnerships with outside advocacy groups. May Day will be the first big test. On May 1, International Workers' Day, a coalition of nearly 40 advocacy groups, is holding actions across the nation related to workers' rights, police brutality and incarceration, immigrants' rights, environmental justice, indigenous sovereignty, and LGBT issues—and more broadly railing against a Trump agenda organizers say puts them all at risk.  This massive effort, dubbed Beyond the Movement , is led by a collective of racial-justice groups known as the Movement for Black Lives. Monday's actions will include protests, marches, and strikes in more than 50 cities, adding to the efforts of the labor organizers who are leading the usual May Day protests. Beyond the Moment kicked off officially on April 4, the 49th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s " ...
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Review: Coal terminal would boost pollution, safety issues 29.4.2017 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- A coal-export terminal proposed in Washington would increase cancer risk for some residents, add 2 million metric tons of global greenhouse gas emissions a year and increase the risk of rail accidents, according to an environmental study released Friday....
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The Daily 202: Trump is caving on border wall funding after showing his base that he tried 25.4.2017 Washington Post: Politics
GOP leadership breathes a sigh of relief. POTUS plans to claim victory anyway.
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Guatemalan land activist wins prestigious Goldman prize 25.4.2017 Washington Post: World
Rodrigo Tot, a 60-year-old farmer and activist, was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize on Monday for work in his Guatemala homeland, an honor that comes after two previous Latin American winners were murdered in the last year.
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Guatemalan land activist wins prestigious Goldman prize 24.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

GUATEMALA CITY (AP) — Rodrigo Tot, a 60-year-old farmer and activist, was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize on Monday for work in his Guatemala homeland, an honor that comes after two previous Latin American winners were murdered in the last year. The diminutive, soft-spoken evangelical pastor was recognized for defending his indigenous Q’eqchi community’s […]
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Guatemalan land activist wins prestigious Goldman prize 24.4.2017 AP Top News
GUATEMALA CITY (AP) -- Rodrigo Tot, a 60-year-old farmer and activist, was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize on Monday for work in his Guatemala homeland, an honor that comes after two previous Latin American winners were murdered in the last year....
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Status of forests is 'dire' as world marks 2017 Earth Day 21.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

They cover a third of the world’s landmass, help to regulate the atmosphere, and offer shelter, sustenance and survival to millions of people, plants and animals.

But despite some progress, the planet’s woodlands continue to disappear on a dramatic scale.

Since 1990 the world has lost the equivalent...

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A Survival Guide for Life 9.4.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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APNewsBreak: Losses from mine spill may be less than feared 3.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

DENVER (AP) — Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered a staggering $1.2 billion in lost […]
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The Bundy family and followers are on trial again. Win or lose in court, theirs is a lost cause 2.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Most people in the West understand that when we behold the horizon, when we walk toward it, what we see and the land we walk on often belongs to all of us. A majority of Westerners want to keep public land public, and so do most Easterners, Southerners and Midwesterners. But that fact hasn’t prevented...

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Tribes that live off coal hold tight to Trump’s promises 2.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Some of the largest tribes in the United States derive their budgets from the fossil fuels that President Donald Trump has pledged to promote, including the Navajo in the Southwest and the Osage in Oklahoma.
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