User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Indigenous People
Last updated: Apr 21 2017 19:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Status of forests is 'dire' as world marks 2017 Earth Day 21.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

They cover a third of the world’s landmass, help to regulate the atmosphere, and offer shelter, sustenance and survival to millions of people, plants and animals.

But despite some progress, the planet’s woodlands continue to disappear on a dramatic scale.

Since 1990 the world has lost the equivalent...

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A Survival Guide for Life 9.4.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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APNewsBreak: Losses from mine spill may be less than feared 3.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

DENVER (AP) — Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered a staggering $1.2 billion in lost […]
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The Bundy family and followers are on trial again. Win or lose in court, theirs is a lost cause 2.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Most people in the West understand that when we behold the horizon, when we walk toward it, what we see and the land we walk on often belongs to all of us. A majority of Westerners want to keep public land public, and so do most Easterners, Southerners and Midwesterners. But that fact hasn’t prevented...

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Tribes that live off coal hold tight to Trump’s promises 2.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Some of the largest tribes in the United States derive their budgets from the fossil fuels that President Donald Trump has pledged to promote, including the Navajo in the Southwest and the Osage in Oklahoma.
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Can the Democratic Party Be White Working Class, Too? 1.4.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Nothing about Governor Steve Bullock bears a resemblance to President Donald Trump. The son of educators, he had a humble, unremarkable upbringing in the Rocky Mountain town of Helena, Montana’s state capital. He is less than comfortable in front of flashbulbs. A Columbia-trained attorney, Bullock is happiest being left alone to study his briefing notes or the minutiae of legislation in his quiet office. His interactions with constituents come across as a little forced but, humble and solicitous, his earnestness shines through. Bullock opened his first State of the State address in 2013 by saying, “My name is Steve and I work for the state.” While Hillary Clinton lost Montana by more than 20 points in 2016, Bullock was narrowly re-elected, winning by a margin of 50 percent to 46 percent. He is cautious about interviews with the press—not because he overtly distrusts reporters, but because he wants to ensure ...
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Why record snow followed by warm temperatures is a dangerous combination for Owens Valley 29.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Thousands of feet above the Owens Valley, melting snow dribbles from granite cracks, succumbing to the sun’s warmth and gravity’s pull.

Glistening rivulets streak the recently drought-parched alluvial fans that spill toward U.S. 395, and along Owens River a mosaic of puddles reflects the fang-like...

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NEA helps the Autry Museum provide a rare platform for Native American playwrights 28.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The story of the American West would be incomplete without the indigenous people who occupied this territory long before the arrival of European immigrants.

Giving the descendants of indigenous people an artistic platform is the goal of Native Voices at the Autry Museum of the American West, which...

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Court gives 2 Indian rivers same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Washington Post: World
A court in northern India has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians.
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Indian court gives Ganges, Yamuna same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW DELHI (AP) — A court in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians. The Uttarakhand High Court ruled Monday that the two rivers be accorded the status of living human entities, meaning that […]
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Indonesia deports 2 French journalists from Papua province 19.3.2017 Washington Post: World
Indonesia has deported two French journalists for committing visa violations while shooting a documentary film in Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua, an official said Sunday.
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Indonesia deports 2 French journalists from Papua province 19.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia has deported two French journalists for committing visa violations while shooting a documentary film in Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua, an official said Sunday. The journalists, Jean Frank Pierre and Basille Marie Longhamp, were sent home Friday through Mozes Kilangin airport in Timika, said immigration office spokesman Agung Sampurno. The […]
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State leaders fill three vacant California Coastal Commission seats 17.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The state’s top elected officials on Thursday completed their selections to fill three vacant positions on the California Coastal Commission — the powerful land use agency that has been buffeted by controversy, including the firing of its executive director last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown made the...

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Here's What a Zinke-Led Interior Department Will Look Like 16.3.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Amid the flurry of Trump administration appointments in recent months, Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke was one of the less controversial. The former Montana congressman says climate change is not a "hoax" and federal lands should not be transferred to states en masse. His January Senate confirmation hearing went fairly smoothly, with none of the major gaffes or arguments that have plagued other appointees' hearings. So far, his stated priorities for Interior have been vague but unsurprising: rebuilding trust between the public and the department, increasing public lands access for sportsmen, and improving outdated infrastructure at national parks. But considering the controversial issues embedded in those priorities he'll soon have to wrangle, the ride won't stay smooth for long. Perhaps the biggest questions around Zinke's Interior are how he will balance a mining and ...
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Australia just delivered a blow to its far-right populists. Here's how we did it. 15.3.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Australia just delivered a blow to its far-right populists. Here's how we did it.
Bone by bone, Iraqis unearthing mass graves: 'Many of the bodies, the hands were tied' 11.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The skull still had a thatch of brown hair attached. The lower jaw was missing, and the forehead had a hole in it.

“Many of the bodies, the hands were tied. They were blindfolded and shot in the forehead,” said Omar Hasan as he surveyed remains scattered beside a sinkhole Islamic State had turned...

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Bone by bone, Iraqis unearth a mass grave: 'We will be out there digging until no one is left' 11.3.2017 L.A. Times - World News

The skull still had a thatch of brown hair attached. The lower jaw was missing, and the forehead had a hole in it.

“Many of the bodies, the hands were tied. They were blindfolded and shot in the forehead,” said Omar Hasan as he surveyed remains scattered beside a sinkhole Islamic State had turned...

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Keystone XL opponents appeal South Dakota authorization 9.3.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline have asked a judge in Pierre, South Dakota, to reverse a decision by state regulators to authorize the portion of the project that would traverse the state. Here’s a look at the proceedings: THE PIPELINE The $8 billion Keystone XL project would move crude […]
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Republicans in Maine, Utah want Trump to undo monuments 6.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Trump's staff is reviewing decisions by the Obama administration to determine economic impacts, whether the law was followed and whether there was appropriate consultation with local officials.
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UN official: Tribe not properly heard in pipeline dispute 3.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A United Nations official who visited North Dakota in the wake of months of protests over the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline believes the concerns and rights of Native Americans haven’t been adequately addressed. North Dakota Republican Gov. Doug Burgum says the state has respected legal protests and that it focused […]
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