User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Indigenous People
Last updated: Feb 10 2016 20:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,963    
Aussie native grass brings 'super-thin' condoms closer to reality 10.2.2016 New Kerala: World News
Washington D.C, Feb 10 : A native Australian grass could hold the key to creating next-generation condoms, according to a team of researchers.
Also found in: [+]
Malcolm Turnbull to present the Closing the Gap report – politics live 10.2.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest
The prime minister will make his first major speech on Indigenous affairs, but remains under pressure over Stuart Robert’s conduct. The government will introduce legislation allowing the medicinal use of cannabis, and estimates hearings continue. All the developments from Canberra, live Auto updates are not currently working on this blog. Please refresh your page to see new posts. 10.24pm ...
Also found in: [+]
Durango, Silverton officials, governor back Superfund listing 6.2.2016 Durango Herald
DENVER – Officials are edging closer to recommending a Superfund listing in the wake of the Gold King Mine spill after closed-door meetings Friday. Gov. John Hickenlooper met with officials from Durango, Silverton and San Juan County late Friday afternoon. After the meeting, the governor said it appears stakeholders are on board...
Also found in: [+]
Newest effort from state not protective enough, critics say 4.2.2016 Seattle Times: Local

The state of Washington has a new round of proposed regulations on water pollution intended to ensure safety of human consumption of fish from local waters.
Also found in: [+]
Colombia's president seeks U.S. support for historic peace deal 4.2.2016 LA Times: Commentary

As Colombia nears a historic treaty to formally end the oldest armed conflict in the Americas, its president, Juan Manuel Santos, came to Washington on Wednesday to ask President Obama for money and other help for the complicated task of post-war reconstruction.

Santos' three-day visit is timed...

Also found in: [+]
Sweden's indigenous Sami people win rights battle against state 3.2.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

Court grants Arctic village rights over hunting and fishing after lawyers for state were accused of ‘rhetoric of race biology’

Sweden’s nomadic reindeer herders have won a 30-year battle for land rights in a court case that has seen the state accused of racism towards the country’s only indigenous people.

A decision in Gällivare district court on Wednesday granted the tiny Sami village of Girjas, inside the Arctic Circle, exclusive rights to control hunting and fishing in the area, restoring powers stripped from the Sami people, or Laplanders, by Sweden’s parliament in 1993.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Northwest Tribes unite against giant coal, oil projects 16.1.2016 Seattle Times: Local

As governments, tribal nations are uniquely empowered in some of the biggest environmental fights in Washington and willing to use that power.
Also found in: [+]
Swinomish tribe hires dental therapist despite opposition 5.1.2016 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- An Indian tribe in Washington state on Monday became the first in the Lower 48 states to hire a dental therapist to provide basic oral health services....
State dentists lobby is blocking low-cost care 4.1.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Dental health for the poor is a big problem in Washington state. Some see dental therapists — licensed professionals who can perform simple procedures — as a route to less expensive care. But the powerful state dentists association has thwarted efforts to allow the therapists.
Also found in: [+]
Tourism projects: Girijans seek share in revenue 28.12.2015 Hindu: Cities
Benefits being denied to the people in the Agency, alleges Girijana Sangham
Also found in: [+]
Alaska’s Inuit link steady food supply to environment health 27.12.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska Inuit hunter John Goodwin for decades has hunted oogruk, the bearded seal, a marine mammal prized for its meat, oil and hide. The largest of Alaska’s ice seals uses sea ice to rest and birth pups, and after the long winter, when ice breaks into floes, there’s a window of […]
Also found in: [+]
Alaska's Inuit link steady food supply to environment health 27.12.2015 AP National
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- Alaska Inuit hunter John Goodwin for decades has hunted oogruk, the bearded seal, a marine mammal prized for its meat, oil and hide....
Also found in: [+]
Navajos seek stake in coal-fired plant 25.12.2015 Durango Herald
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. – The Navajo Nation is pursuing an ownership stake in a coal-fired power plant in New Mexico as many utilities are divesting from the energy source. The Navajo Transitional Energy Co. said it is negotiating with the operator of the Four Corners Power Plant for a 7 percent interest as a way to build expertise in...
Also found in: [+]
Paris climate talks turn up the heat on world leaders – podcast transcript 16.12.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

The Guardian environment editor John Vidal reports from the UN climate change conference in Paris, on what the deal might mean for developing countries

Listen to the podcast

Reports and presenters:

JV: John Vidal

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Claim no easy victories. Paris was a failure, but a climate justice movement is rising 15.12.2015 Guardian: Environment

The terrifying deadlines approached by climate change tempt us to despair. But the face of the movement stirs us to courage.

Two certainties existed entering the Paris climate talks. They hold as true coming out. The first was that the world’s heads of state were not prepared to act as is necessary. The second is that it was never going to be up to them anyway.

The richest governments – politically captured by a fossil fuel-wedded corporate class – were hobbled from the outset. It was the movement being built by activists around the globe that shaped the best of the Paris agreement. And what was worst they were unable to prevent.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Here's Everything You Need to Know About That Big Climate Deal 14.12.2015 Mother Jones
The story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The Paris Agreement to address climate change, adopted on Saturday, will be remembered as a big step forward and at the same time a frustrating set of compromises and omissions. The COP21 conference brought every country to the table, they all accepted the science of climate change, and they agreed to work together to do something about it. But some proved more ambitious than others, and the rich countries didn't come up with enough money to get the best deal possible. The bottom line is that the agreement gets us far closer to containing climate change than we were two weeks ago, but still far short of where we need to go. In fact, we won't even know for years what it will accomplish. How much the agreement reduces greenhouse gas emissions, and through that reduces warming, will depend on whether countries meet their targets for curbing emissions and deploying renewable energy and whether they ...
Also found in: [+]
How Utah quietly made plans to ship coal through California 12.12.2015 LA Times: Nation

The embattled United States coal industry has said for years that its future is in Asia. The question has been how to get there.

New coal export facilities proposed for the West Coast have met stiff and sometimes fatal resistance. City councils have passed defiant resolutions saying coal terminals...

Also found in: [+]
Draft Paris agreement disappoints civil society 11.12.2015 Hindu: Energy & Environment
Article 2 of the agreement, which sets out its purpose, dilutes concerns of defending rights concerning gender, indigenous communities and workers
Also found in: [+]
Alec Baldwin: Send Trump to climate talks 11.12.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Other than being an old-ish white guy who likes a nice suit, Alec Baldwin doesn't have much in common with billionaire blowhard Donald Trump.
Also found in: [+]
The Big Climate Agreement Won't Keep Fossil Fuels in the Ground 9.12.2015 Mother Jones
This story was first published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. On Sunday, a handful of kayaks gathered on the Bassin de la Villete canal in northeastern Paris, in front of a footbridge hung with banners. The one in English read, "Defend the Sacred, Protect the Water." The paddlers were indigenous rights activists from the Americas and Asia. Inside an adjacent boathouse at the subsequent press conference, indigenous leaders in traditional regalia such as beaded sashes and feathered headdresses held forth on the need to "keep it in the ground" when it comes to fossil fuels. The event, cosponsored by groups such as the Indigenous Environmental Network and Friends of the Earth, aimed to influence the ongoing COP21 climate negotiations happening in Paris. They want the final agreement to protect indigenous rights, in particular the right to be free from fossil fuel extraction on or near their ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,963