User: irge304 Topic: Green Technology
Category: Building
Last updated: Jun 27 2015 06:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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State and city climate policy is mired in symbolism 27.6.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
Bipartisan approaches to increase energy efficiency would do more good than wasteful climate policies and regulations.
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U.S. design firm puts its stamp on Shanghai skyline 25.6.2015 LA Times: Commentary
To grasp the enormous dimensions of the Shanghai Tower, try this simple exercise:
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Survival of the greenest beer? Breweries adapt to a changing climate 24.6.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Breweries are grappling with more weather extremes -- heat waves, snowy winters, heavy rains and drought. Many are coming up with creative ways to adjust to their changing environments.
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Survival Of The Greenest Beer? Breweries Adapt To A Changing Climate 24.6.2015 NPR Health Science
Breweries are grappling with more weather extremes — heat waves, snowy winters, heavy rains and drought. Many are coming up with creative ways to adjust to their changing environments.
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Biodegradable batteries and induction charging cars: five tech trends to watch 22.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
A run-down of green technology’s most cutting-edge innovations, including transparent solar cells and microgeneration boilers Earlier this year Sir David King, former chief scientific adviser to the UK government and now the special representative for climate change, told a climate conference that there should be a greater focus on green technologies to help tackle climate change. While most people would have no problem with this idea, the real issue is which technologies to back. We are not short on innovation. Over the last 20 years, there have been 1.2m granted patents and published patent applications from across the US, Europe and some world territories, on the clean tech patenting site CleanTech PatentEdge ...
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North Korean drought is hobbling the power supply, and the economy with it 22.6.2015 Washington Post: World
TOKYO — Light showers are forecast for Pyongyang over the next few days, but the torrential downpours that drench northeast Asia this time each year have not yet reached North Korea. And even when the rains arrive, they will almost certainly not be enough to fill the reservoirs in the hydro­power-dependent country, which is suffering from severe electricity shortages. Read full article ...
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End of the corner office: D.C. law firm designs its new space for millennials 22.6.2015 Washington Post
From the moment Jeff Costellia graduated from law school and joined big law firms, he had one destination in mind: the corner office.It wasn’t just the palatial space, the private conference table, the windows and light and the nice view. The corner office was a marker of achievement, a physical symbol of your status at the very top of a competitive hierarchy that you’d spent years working to climb.Read full article ...
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Iberdrola calls for EU energy reform 21.6.2015 Financial Times: Energy
Group criticises sweeping changes to German power market, where coal has expanded alongside solar
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Daryl Hannah: ‘It’s scary being in solitary’ 21.6.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
In the 80s, the Hollywood star was best known as a mermaid in Splash and a replicant in Blade Runner. More recently, she has concentrated on green issues, and her protests have landed her in jail. So does Sense8, her new Netflix series with the Wachowskis, herald a comeback? On the hottest day of the year so far, Daryl Hannah appears like a mirage outside her Paris hotel. She has been window-shopping and people-watching, but the heat is intense and her foundation is flaking. She explains that she likes taking walks in the city because this was where it all started; it is where her parents met. Without Paris, she says, she would not even exist. Hannah is in town to plug her role in Sense8 , an audacious, globe-hopping Netflix series about fluid identities and the shadowy links between the present and the past . As luck would have it, the first three episodes have her cropping up as a ghost on various bustling city streets. Flaxen hair trails across her shoulders. Her gaze is full of mysterious import. She ...
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Olafur Eliasson: ‘I am not special’ 21.6.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
As well as his fabled Tate Modern sun, the ever-modest Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson has made waterfalls in New York and rivers run green all over the world. But what’s he up to in Manchester with Wayne McGregor and Jamie xx? Olafur Eliasson, the Icelandic-Danish artist who will probably always be best known for the vast sun he induced to rise inside the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in 2003, works in Berlin in a building that once housed a brewery. Artists haven’t been associated with garrets for a while now, but even by 21st-century standards this place is something else. While Eliasson calls it a “reality-producing machine”, a term born of his conviction that, far from being rarefied and utopian, the projects it turns out are deeply involved with the world in which they’re made, it seems more like a kind of factory to me, albeit one devoted to the manufacture of ideas rather than of things. Eighty people are employed in its cavernous spaces, working on everything from the archive to the ...
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Catch them if you can: the pragmatic ways to cut carbon emissions 21.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
Within five years Britain could have three power stations that capture around 90% of their carbon before it reaches the atmosphere. And in the US, a synthetic resin could absorb CO2 far more efficiently than trees. We examine the technologies involved in the battle against climate change With an immense scientific consensus that manmade greenhouse gases cause climate change, there is pressure to reduce carbon emissions, but l ittle sign that governments can reach a binding agreement to cut back sufficiently. The answer may be a new material that is a thousand times more efficient at capturing carbon dioxide than trees. This substance, a synthetic resin , is a part of diverse attempts to make carbon capture and storage (CCS) practical. Mercedes Maroto-Valer, professor of sustainable energy engineering at Heriot-Watt University, defines CCS as “a portfolio of technologies that aim to separate carbon dioxide from other gases, then capture and store them in a permanent situation”. CCS is a pragmatic ...
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Aid agencies must rewire their approach to refugees' energy needs | Michael Keating and Rob Bailey 20.6.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
In the rush to respond to crises, access to safe, reliable and clean energy for refugees is often overlooked. A new energy initiative could provide a solution Many years ago, UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, printed a poster of Albert Einstein with the caption “Einstein was a refugee” – a reminder of the enormous contribution that refugees have made to the world. But this World Refugee Day , instead of celebrating their contribution, we will unfortunately have to focus on finding solutions for an unprecedented global crisis. António Guterres, the head of the UNHCR, has spoken of a world facing “an unchecked slide into an era in which the scale of global forced displacement, as well as the response required, is now clearly dwarfing anything seen ...
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Jamaica Plain home shows the power of solar 19.6.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
The solar panels at 45 Wyman St. were designed by Elon Musk of Tesla and SpaceX ...
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Pope Francis: Humans Are Turning the Earth Into an "Immense Pile of Filth" 18.6.2015 Mother Jones
This is an excerpt from Pope Francis' encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si. This article was originally published by the Guardian and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The Earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth. In many parts of the planet, the elderly lament that once beautiful landscapes are now covered with rubbish. Industrial waste and chemical products utilized in cities and agricultural areas can lead to bio-accumulation in the organisms of the local population, even when levels of toxins in those places are low. Frequently no measures are taken until after people's health has been irreversibly affected. These problems are closely linked to a throwaway culture which affects the excluded just as it quickly reduces things to rubbish. To cite one example, most of the paper we produce is thrown away and not recycled. It is hard for us to accept that the way natural ecosystems work is exemplary: plants synthesize nutrients ...
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You Can Do Real-World Work at This Free Coding Boot Camp 18.6.2015 Wired Top Stories
Free Code Camp teaches you to code, then lets you volunteer your new-found programming skills to non-profit organizations throughout the ...
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Pope Francis’s encyclical: On care for our common home 18.6.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
The same mindset that stands in the way of making radical decisions to reverse the trend of global warming also stands in the way of achieving the goal of eliminating poverty This is an extract from Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si A very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system When people become self-centred and self-enclosed, their greed ...
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China ‘deserves credit’ for renewables 16.6.2015 BBC: Business
China should be given more credit for its investment in clean electricity, the head of the International Energy Agency says.
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Kicking the coal habit 15.6.2015 Financial Times: Editorial
China’s moves to boost gas supplies should be welcomed
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Racing Around the World in 80 Days—Without Fossil Fuels 15.6.2015 Wired Top Stories
Teams will set out from Paris on a race around the world, all aiming to cover 25,000 miles and make it back to the French capital within 80 days, without burning fossil ...
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Trouble in the air for wind power players 13.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
The onshore wind energy industry is under threat from Tory plans designed to arrest the spread of turbines. But do people really dislike them that much? “Look at the energy efficiency of this.” John Zamick, 57, stands beneath a single wind turbine in a field near Swindon. “I stand here in awe. This is unbelievable magic. It’s money from thin air.” “Thick air,” says his colleague, Bob Carnell, 60. Unabashed, Zamick continues. “That tower is 40 tons of steel. But it’s an eggshell. It’s 10mm thick at the top, at the bottom, 20mm.” Zamick’s company, DistGen, has six turbines in the UK and is raising crowdfunded investment in order to finish another one, in Cumbria. Shortly afterwards, we cross a door marked Danger of Death, into the turbine itself, a tiny round room full of grey boxes, that looks like an advert for joining the army. “I don’t think you’d be in this business unless you’re a true believer. And I am a believer. But I came from an engineering and business background. I’m not a ...
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