User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Aug 26 2016 17:12 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Obama to create world's largest ocean reserve off Hawaiian coast 26.8.2016 The Hill
Obama is expanding several times the size of a marine national monument.
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Climate change taking toll on American pika's Western lands 26.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Populations of a rabbit-like animal known as the American pika are vanishing in many mountainous areas of the West as climate change alters its habitat, according to findings released Thursday by the U.S. Geological Survey. The range for the mountain-dwelling herbivore is decreasing in southern Utah, northeastern California and in the Great Basin that covers most of Nevada and parts of Utah, Oregon, Idaho and California, the federal agency concluded after studying the cuddly looking critter from... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Wolf advocates outraged that state preparing to kill wolves 26.8.2016 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- Some wolf advocates are outraged that the state is preparing for the second time to exterminate an entire wolf pack for preying on livestock in northeastern Washington state....
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Environmentalists to sue San Bernardino and Colton over the killing of threatened fish 23.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A coalition of environmental groups Monday announced plans to sue a regional water treatment authority and the cities of San Bernardino and Colton over the repeated stranding and killing of Santa Ana suckers, a fish on the federal threatened species list.

Roughly once a month, a water treatment...

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New Bell Museum will include a walk-through diorama 22.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Bell Museum of Natural History will soon move into a new and bigger home. George Weiblen, one of the museum's curators, shared details on the new facility.
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Tunisia: On the Front Lines of the Struggle Against Climate Change 21.8.2016 Truthout.com
Kerkennah is a group of islands lying off the east coast of Tunisia in the Gulf of Gabès, around 20km away from the mainland city of Sfax. The two main islands are Chergui and Gharbi. When approaching the islands by ferry, one is struck by a curious sight: the coastal waters are divided into countless parcels, separated from one another by thousands of palm tree leaves. This is what Kerkennis call charfia, a centuries-old fishing method ingeniously designed to lure fish into a capture chamber from where they can be easily recovered. As the land is arid, agricultural activity is limited to subsistence farming. For the islanders fishing is one of the key economic activities, but for big multinational corporations it is the exploitation of oil and gas. Despite a new article in the Tunisian constitution stipulating state sovereignty over natural resources and transparency in the related contracts, oil and gas companies continue to garner obscene profits and enjoy impunity. At the same time, local communities ...
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Life Itself Is Being Patented, Privatized and Radically Re-engineered 21.8.2016 Truthout.com
Discussing the origins of agribusiness in the 15th century, problems with 20th-century wilderness "set asides," issues with contemporary biodiversity "hot spots" and an approach to "rewilding" that could help reverse the rate of extinction, Ashley Dawson offers critiques and insights into our ecosystem under capitalism. "Whether it is in the form of indigenous movements from Ecuador to the Alberta tar sands challenging the destruction of their lands through extreme extraction, to environmental justice movements in cities from New York to Beijing, to transnational organizations like Via Campesina fighting for sustainable ecological farming, resistance to the deadly culture of capitalism is vibrant and legion." (Photo: Obert Madondo / Flickr ) Did you know that the Earth loses about one hundred species every day? In Extinction: A Radical History, author, activist and professor Ashley Dawson ties together history, science and political theory to explain the impact of humans and capitalism on the world's ...
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What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning 20.8.2016 Washington Post
What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning
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Does Offshore Fracking Put Endangered Species at Risk? 18.8.2016 Truthout.com
Despite two deadly oil spills off the coast of Santa Barbara and their devastating impacts on marine life, federal regulators have approved offshore fracking at 23 sites in sensitive Pacific waters without consulting wildlife officials. (Photo: Arbyreed ; Edited: LW / TO) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Environmental groups in California are preparing to file lawsuits against federal regulators for allegedly approving the use of offshore fracking at 23 oil and gas platforms in sensitive Pacific waters without consulting wildlife officials about the potential harms to endangered species, such as sea otters and whales. The Environmental Defense Center (EDC) and the Santa Barbara Channelkeeper announced last week its intent to sue the two US Interior Department agencies that regulate offshore oil and gas production, alleging that regulators violated the Endangered Species Act when ...
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The Climate Catastrophe Cannot Be Reversed Within the Capitalist Culture 18.8.2016 Truthout.com
The biodiversity that supports the planetary ecosystem as we and our ancestors have known it is imperiled. We face a clear choice: radical political transformation or deepening mass extinction. Did you know that the Earth loses about one hundred species every day? In Extinction: A Radical History, Ashley Dawson ties together history, science and political theory to explain the impact of humans and capitalism on the world's ecosystems. Get your copy of this book by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout! The following is the introduction to Extinction: A Radical History: His face was hacked off. Left prostrate in the red dust, to be preyed on by vultures, his body remained intact except for the obscene hole where his magnificent six foot long tusks used to be. Satao was a so-called tusker, an African elephant with a rare genetic strain that produced tusks so long that they dangled to the ground, making him a prime attraction in Kenya's Tsavo East National Park. These beautiful tusks also made him ...
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Editorial: Everyone should step up to control mosquitoes 18.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
People hate mosquitoes. Really, really hate mosquitoes. And with good reason. Not only are mosquito bites annoying, they are the primary carriers of such troublesome and sometimes deadly diseases as malaria, yellow fever, West Nile virus and, new on the list of things to worry about, Zika virus. We hate mosquitoes so much that no less an authority than biologist E.O. Wilson — one of the world’s foremost experts on, and advocates for, biological diversity — says he would gladly pull the switch i...
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California butterflies and neonicotinoids! 17.8.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
When a great, immoveable pollution source is faced by an increasingly smaller butterfly population, what is going to happen? Ask the bees, if their nervous systems are still savvy.
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Did Federal Agents Spy on Offshore Oil Lease Protesters in New Orleans? 16.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Back in March, hundreds of protesters  descended on the Superdome  in New Orleans to disrupt a federal auction for new Gulf of Mexico oil and gas leases. They waved signs, carried banners and chanted "Shut it down!" and "the Gulf is not for profit!" The action was part of the international Keep It in the Ground campaign seeking to halt the extraction of fossil fuels in order to prevent devastating climate change. Now an advocacy group wants to know if federal officials worked with local law enforcement and oil and gas industry insiders to spy on environmentalists involved in that and other protests held as part of the campaign. This week the Center for Biological Diversity  filed Freedom of Information Act requests  with the federal agencies that oversee oil and gas leasing. The Aug. 11 filings came in response to a recent  report by The Intercept  that revealed several participants in a May protest of a fossil fuel auction in Lakewood, Colorado, were actually undercover agents sent by law enforcement to ...
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Land use plan for California desert turns frequent allies into foes 16.8.2016 Washington Post
Though typically united behind conservation causes, solar-energy advocates and environmentalists have split over a plan to divide up the desert’s public lands between renewable energy and conservation areas.
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Wildlife officials in Washington state kill two gray wolves, plan to remove others 13.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

State wildlife officials in helicopters have shot and killed two gray wolves in northeastern Washington, and authorities plan on removing more of the animals. 

Two adult female wolves that roam Ferry County, including this year's breeding female, were killed on Aug. 5, the Department of Fish and...

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'No Man’s Sky’ is so huge - and popular - players found 10 million virtual species in one night 11.8.2016 Washington Post
'No Man’s Sky’ is so huge - and popular - players found 10 million virtual species in one night
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Spotlight on green news & views: Uranium taint covered up in NC; modified bug to fight Zika? 11.8.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight.  More than 25,470 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES radicalink writes— Arctic Thaw as Dystopian Treasure Box : “It started about a decade ago when I read a book on the 1918 Spanish Flu, during which the worst month in Oct 1918 almost 200,000 died in America. Thousands dead in every major American city and 30 to 50 million people across the globe died. .  We have sort of expunged that epidemic from our collective memory. But it was a small section of the book that caught my attention in relation to the topic at hand… Arctic warming and melting permafrost.  In 1951 a team of scientists went to the little village of Brevig Mission in Alaska and ...
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Scientists: Species face bigger threats than climate change 11.8.2016 Washington Post
A new commentary published in the journal Nature argues that because practices such as fishing and farming present the biggest threats to biodiversity, efforts to address them should not be overshadowed by concern over the climate.  
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No Man’s Sky players discover over 10M unique in-game species overnight 11.8.2016 TechCrunch
 The space exploration game No Man’s Sky features biodiversity that would make Earth weep with envy, and players are incredibly avid taxonomers. Hello Games founder Sean Murray tweeted today that players have racked up over 10 million species discoveries thus far in-game, which is around five to 6.5 times the number of known species on earth, depending on whose numbers you trust. While… Read ...
Challenge to presidential candidates: Debate about science 10.8.2016 Washington Post
Challenge to presidential candidates: Debate about science
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