User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 05:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Spotlight on green news & views: SEC looks into Exxon; California could last for centuries 22.9.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight.  More than 25,525 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  FishOutofWater writes— 375 National Academy Scientists Rebuke Trump, Warn of Severe Outcome of Quitting Paris Climate Deal : “Today 375 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel laureates, warned that the consequences of opting out of the Paris climate agreement, as planned by Donald Trump, would be severe and long-lasting for our planet’s climate and for the credibility of the United States. Distinguished MIT Professor Kerry Emanuel, one of the authors of the letter, is a philosophical conservative who was driven out of the Republican party by climate change ...
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Plan divvies up desert for conservation, energy projects 15.9.2016 AP Business
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Swaths of public land in the California desert will be opened to solar and wind farms under a federal plan released Wednesday that preserves much of the landscape for conservation and recreation....
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Could Wisconsin study solve Mille Lacs walleye decline mystery? 14.9.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Warmer waters cited in walleye decline.
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NASA Begins Study of Australia's Great Barrier Reef 14.9.2016 Boing Boing
“A NASA airborne mission designed to transform our understanding of Earth's valuable and ecologically sensitive coral reefs has set up shop in Australia for a two-month investigation of the Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest reef ecosystem,” reports NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory ...
Time to Drive Factory Farmed Food Off the Market 12.9.2016 Truthout - All Articles
After a decade of exposing and demonizing Monsanto and genetically engineered foods, including an intense four-year battle to force mandatory labeling of GMOs (a battle rudely terminated in July when Congress rammed through the outrageous DARK Act ), the US food movement stands at the crossroads.  Should we keep badgering Monsanto's minions in Washington for the right to know what's in our food, a sentiment shared by the overwhelming majority of consumers? Or should we focus more on single-issue reforms, such as banning neonicotinoid bee-killing pesticides, better nutrition in schools, taxes on soda, and an end to the reckless use of antibiotics in animal feed?  A growing number of food activists believe it's time to move beyond limited or single-issue campaigning and lobbying and take on the entire degenerative food and farming system, starting with the malevolent profit-driver and lynchpin of industrial agriculture, GMOs and fast food: factory farming. We obviously can't count on a corrupt Congress or ...
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Meet the small gray songbird that has restricted so much California coastal development 12.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

For two decades, a small gray songbird has made the difference between development and conservation in some of the most coveted coastal land in California.

A federal decision last week to leave the coastal California gnatcatcher on the endangered species list brought praise from environmentalists...

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False Promises: Avoid "Miracle" Rice and Just Eat a Carrot 10.9.2016 Truthout.com
Vandana Shiva. (Photo: The Seeds of Vandana Shiva film) New Delhi -- Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution, died on September 9, 2009. Alfred G. Gilman died on December 23, 2015. Both were Nobel laureates and now both dead. Gilman was a signatory to a recent letter condemning Greenpeace and its opposition to genetic engineering. How many Nobel laureates does it take to write a letter? Easily ascertained -- the dead Gilman and 106 others were enlisted in "supporting GMOs and golden rice". Correct answer -- 107, dead or alive. The laureates were rounded up by Val Giddings (senior fellow, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation), Jon Entine (author of Abraham's Children: Race, Identity and the DNA of the Chosen People) and Jay Byrne (former head of corporate communications, Monsanto). Real people don't have the luxury of getting Nobel laureates to write 1/107th of a letter, "chosen" folk do. Evidently. Cornell University is a "chosen" institution – central to genetically modified public ...
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The Tasmanian tiger went extinct 80 years ago today. But that took decades to figure out. 7.9.2016 Washington Post
The Tasmanian tiger went extinct 80 years ago today. But that took decades to figure out.
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Judge puts hold on plan to open California lands to fracking 7.9.2016 AP National
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A federal judge on Tuesday tentatively rejected a plan by the federal Bureau of Land Management to open more than 1,500 square miles of lands in central California to oil drilling and fracking....
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Obama’s national monument expansion shows why conservation matters more than ever 3.9.2016 Washington Post: Editorials
Biodiversity is crucial to human safety.
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Washington wolf killing sparks rebukes, controversy 3.9.2016 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- The on-going extermination of a wolf pack in Washington has prompted a university to disavow statements by one of its professors in defense of wolves - the latest development in a controversy that pits conservationists against cattle ranchers in a part of the state far from the populous Seattle metro area....
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Reward to find killer of sea otters off Central Coast doubles to $20,000 2.9.2016 LA Times: Environment

The reward to find whoever is responsible for fatally shooting three sea otters off the Central Coast has been doubled to $20,000.

On Thursday, the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity announced it would contribute to the reward announced by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife earlier...

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Hemmed in by freeways and human development, L.A.'s mountain lions could be near extinction in 50 years 1.9.2016 LA Times: Science

Mountain lions living in Greater Los Angeles could be at risk of extinction within the next 50 years if the population remains isolated by freeways and other forms of human development, UCLA and National Park Service wildlife ecologists are warning.

About 15 pumas survive in the Santa Monica Mountains,...

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Cables Reveal US Government's Role in Herakles Farms Land Grab in Cameroon 31.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Cables obtained by the non-profit Oakland Institute through a Freedom of Information Act request reveal that US government officials pushed the Central African nation of Cameroon to approve a deeply controversial oil palm development owned by Herakles Farms despite full knowledge of the project's negative impacts on the environment and local communities. Sithe Global Sustainable Oils Cameroon (SG-SOC), a subsidiary of US agribusiness firm Herakles Farms, signed a convention with a Cameroonian government minister in 2009 to develop a large-scale palm oil plantation that included a 99-year lease for 73,086 hectares (about 180,600 acres) of land in the Ndian and Kupe-Manenguba Divisions in southwest Cameroon. The development was contentious from the start , as the convention was likely illegal, given that land in excess of 50 hectares can only be granted by presidential decree under Cameroonian law. Nonetheless, the company began clearing forest and developing nurseries in 2010, converting pristine tropical ...
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Cougars in Hollywood 31.8.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
How can foxes, badgers and other Carnivores survive when a giant freeway blocks their route to feeding areas? The demography, the genetics and the extinction risk are all considered here, with a resonance for all species that need some kind of wildlife corridor in order to fulfil their life potential.
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Settlement forces US to decide whether 9 species endangered 31.8.2016 AP National
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) -- The U.S. government agreed Tuesday to decide over the next several years if federal protections are needed to help a small, fanged predator of the Northern Rockies, massive alligator snapping turtles in the South and seven other troubled species that in some cases have awaited action for years....
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A British woman holds the world's most charming job title: Hedgehog officer 29.8.2016 Washington Post
A British woman holds the world's most charming job title: Hedgehog officer
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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems 28.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity's greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels -- adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge to cut it's own carbon emissions, targeting everything from the burning of fossil fuels to deforestation to agriculture. It seems like a Herculean task, bound, the optimistic say, to bring positive ...
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Obama to create world's largest ocean reserve off Hawaiian coast 26.8.2016 The Hill
Obama is expanding several times the size of a marine national monument.
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Climate change taking toll on American pika's Western lands 26.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Populations of a rabbit-like animal known as the American pika are vanishing in many mountainous areas of the West as climate change alters its habitat, according to findings released Thursday by the U.S. Geological Survey. The range for the mountain-dwelling herbivore is decreasing in southern Utah, northeastern California and in the Great Basin that covers most of Nevada and parts of Utah, Oregon, Idaho and California, the federal agency concluded after studying the cuddly looking critter from... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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