User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Aug 02 2015 20:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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It's Time for a New Story of Humanity's Place in the World 2.8.2015 Truthout.com
The prevailing perception of humans as inherently at odds with nature is not only false, it's counterproductive. (Image: Nature in mind via Shutterstock) June 3, 2015 - It goes without saying that humans are good at causing problems. Climate change , overfishing and widespread environmental contamination from chemical toxicants are all creations of our own making. But are we destined to create such problems? Many people believe so, and argue that our capacity for self-interest, avarice and ecological shortsightedness make us inherently unsustainable as a species . Not only is this way of thinking built on long-disproven myths about human nature and human origins, it also constrains how we think about solutions and alienates us from the rest of the natural world. We need to abandon this belief and not allow ourselves to be defined only by our most recent history. The truth of the matter is that we belong here, and belonging is a much more powerful narrative for sustainability than isolation. In western ...
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Study finds bug diversity cuts down on crop pests 31.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Researchers found that corn pests are less of a problem when there's a diverse population of bugs.
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Lobbying and Campaign Cash Fuel GOP Attacks on Endangered Species 31.7.2015 Truthout.com
Corporate lobbyists and conservative lawmakers are working to undermine the protections for endangered species that stand in the way of big agriculture and oil and gas development.   A male sage grouse in Owyhee, Idaho. Large oil companies and their industry groups have repeatedly lobbied members of Congress to prevent the placement of certain threatened species on the endangered list, including the sage grouse - which exist in areas they want to drill. (Photo: Gary O. Grimm/Flickr ) Last year, Exxon Mobile lobbied Congress on a bill that would have placed the greater sage-grouse on the endangered species list. BP lobbied on "Endangered Species Act issues impacting oil and gas development including prairie chicken and sage grouse," according to federal lobbying records. In 2008, Shell Oil lobbied on the listing of polar bears as an endangered species. The records do not specify the company's position on the issue, but they do indicate that the lobbying was part of an aggressive push to open federal ...
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As a killer fungus looms, scientists call for a ban on salamander imports 31.7.2015 LA Times: Science
If it makes its way to our shores, a newly discovered fungus from Asia could wipe out large numbers of salamander species and spark a major North American biodiversity crisis, scientists are warning.
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Environmental Group Sues California Over ‘Fundamentally Flawed’ Fracking Report 31.7.2015 Think Progres

An environmental group is suing the state of California’s oil agency for not incorporating certain information into its fracking rules

The post Environmental Group Sues California Over ‘Fundamentally Flawed’ Fracking Report appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Why We All Need to Learn the Word "Anthropogenic" 30.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The wettest rainforest in the continental United States had gone up in flames and the smoke was so thick, so blanketing, that you could see it miles away. Deep in Washington's Olympic National Park, the aptly named Paradise Fire, undaunted by the dampness of it all, was eating the forest alive and destroying an ecological Eden. In this season of drought across the West, there have been far bigger blazes but none quite so symbolic or offering quite such grim news. It isn't the size of the fire (though it is the largest in the park's history), nor its intensity. It's something else entirely - the fact that it shouldn't have been burning at all. When fire can eat a rainforest in a relatively cool climate, you know the Earth is beginning to burn. And here's the thing: the Olympic Peninsula is my home. Its destruction is my personal nightmare and I couldn't stay away. Smoke Gets in My Eyes "What a bummer! Can't even see Mount Olympus," a disappointed tourist exclaimed from the Hurricane Ridge visitor center. ...
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The Science Of Why You Are So Upset About Cecil The Lion And Not Billions Of Other Animals 29.7.2015 Think Progres

The science behind what you are probably feeling right now.

The post The Science Of Why You Are So Upset About Cecil The Lion And Not Billions Of Other Animals appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Peru stalling new national park for unique Amazon mountain range 29.7.2015 Guardian: Environment
Over one million hectares, flora, fauna and people at risk from government failure to act The Sierra del Divisor region in the Peruvian Amazon was identified as a biodiversity conservation priority back in the early 1990s. More than 20 years later and Peruvians are still waiting - some more desperately than others given all the narco-traffickers, illegal loggers and gold-miners in or near the region. What’s so special about the Sierra del Divisor? It’s the “only mountainous region” anywhere in the lowland rainforest, according to Peruvian NGO Instituto del Bien Comun (IBC), while The Field Museum, in the US, describes it as “a mountain range” rising up “dramatically from the lowlands of central Amazonian Peru” and boasting “rare and diverse geological formations that occur nowhere else in Amazonia.” Its most iconic topographical feature is “El Cono”, an extraordinary peak visible from the Andes on a clear ...
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India conducts first official survey of Ganges dolphins 28.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Conservation programme aims to protect the endangered species and restore biodiversity of the polluted river, reports The Straits Times

The conservation of dolphins in India’s holiest, but most polluted waterway, is under the spotlight as the country conducts its first official count of the freshwater species.

An estimated 450 volunteers, government experts and conservationists will take part in the exercise, which spans the states of Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal, in November and December.

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Burns scheduled north of Cortez 28.7.2015 Durango Herald
DENVER – Smoke may be seen from prescribed burns scheduled for Southwest Colorado this week.The Bureau of Land Management’s Tres Rios Field Office said controlled burns may start as early as Wednesday at five locations – all about five miles east of Egnar on federal lands.Above-normal precipitation, cooler...
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Climate change threatens China’s booming coastal cities, says expert 25.7.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

With an ageing society and more people living by the coast, China faces a challenge coping with climate change, reports China Daily

A recent study led by Georgina Mace, ecosystem professor at University College London, indicated that governments across the world have failed to grasp the risk that population booms in coastal cities pose as climate change continues to cause rises in sea levels and extreme weather events. Mace is director of the UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research.

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Deep-sea mining looms on horizon as UN body issues contracts 25.7.2015 AP Top News
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -- The deep oceans span more than half the globe and their frigid depths have long been known to contain vast, untapped deposits of prized minerals. These treasures of the abyss, however, have always been out of reach to miners....
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Industrial Pollution Is Threatening Our Drinking Water: A Dispatch From Los Angeles County 23.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
A public swimming pool in Maywood, Southeast Los Angeles. Maywood is home to a pilot project aimed at tackling groundwater pollution in the county. (Photo: Daniel Ross) While a drought-striken LA county scrambles to find funds and solutions to clean up toxic chemicals dumped by industry for decades into the water supply, a report finds illegal wells have dumped billions of gallons of hazardous oil waste into protected aquifers throughout the state. A public swimming pool in Maywood, Southeast Los Angeles. Maywood is home to a pilot project aimed at tackling groundwater pollution in the county. (Photo: Daniel Ross) Want to support Truthout's work and make double your impact? Click here to make a donation that will be matched dollar-for-dollar - for a limited time only. Parched brown postage-stamp lawns, freeway signs extolling water conservation and scorched, tinder-dry hillsides are just some of the more visible reminders of the current drought's choking grip for the 10.2 million people who live in Los ...
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Scientists: we are 'condemning' forest elephants by ignoring evidence 23.7.2015 Guardian: Environment
As the ivory trade threatens to obliterate forest elephants, conservationists and governments fail to recognise them as a distinct species despite rising genetic and physical evidence. How do you tell two species apart? Let’s say you’re investigating a bird with two populations. One lives in the savanna, the other in the forest. The savanna population eats grasshoppers, but the one in the forest eats beetles. The savanna bird is big-bodied with a curvy beak; the forest bird is smaller with a straighter beak. Is this enough to determine you’re dealing with not one, but two species? Probably. But how about you look at the genetics? Lo and behold, the animals’ DNA shows that the birds have been separated by 6 million years – easily making it two species. Now, let’s say we’re not talking about birds here, but elephants. African elephants. Suddenly, things get messy. Really messy. And political. And ...
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What is the millennium development goal on sustainability all about? | Sam Jones 23.7.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

The goal is aimed at reversing degradation of the environment such as deforestation and providing people with safe drinking water and sanitation

MDG7 is a broad goal with a mix of ill-defined aims and more precise ones. Its four targets focus on sustainable development, environmental protection, access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and improving the lives of millions of people living in slums.

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Group demands change in dam operations to protect frog 22.7.2015 AP Washington
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) -- A conservation group demands a change in operations at two irrigation dams on the upper Deschutes River to protect the Oregon spotted frog, a threatened species....
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Hemp vs. marijuana: Minnesota researcher finds genetic difference 21.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
"We think that this genetic discovery has some policy implications and should be considered as efforts are underway to open the door to commercial hemp cultivation," said plant biologist George Weiblen.
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CartoDB Lets Anyone Visualize Their Data With One-Click Mapping 21.7.2015 techCrunch
 CartoDB, an online map maker and business intelligence startup, wants to make it easy for anyone to communicate information with a map. Today the startup is unleashing a new feature, One-Click Mapping, that will analyze any data you upload and automatically create maps showing the relevant information. Originally, CartoDB provided software for map makers and data scientists,… Read ...
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Walk on the wild side: saving California's mountain lions 16.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Santa Monica’s mountain lions are hemmed in on all sides by highways, the ocean and open fields – leading to road deaths and in-breeding. A lush overpass spanning 10 freeway lanes would allow them to roam freely and safely Bee highways and squirrel suspension bridges – in pictures Highways bring people and cities closer together. Where once dusty wagon trails inhibited access to goods and services from other parts of the country, the rise of the freeway (and the car) provided unprecedented mobility for people – but, it turns out, not for wildlife. In Los Angeles, the mountain lions of the Santa Monica mountains are trapped, hemmed in by busy oncoming traffic from the 101 freeway. “They’ll come right up to the freeway on both sides, turn around and leave. We know they’re not crossing,” says Jeff Sikich, a US National Park Service (NPS) ...
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Here's a Really Clever Plan to Force the Feds to Deal With Climate Change 13.7.2015 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Reading about ocean acidification is usually a bummer: A hefty portion of the carbon dioxide we're spewing into the atmosphere is getting absorbed into the oceans, where it is killing off sea creatures (including some of the most delicious ones) and ruining coastal economies. Each report on the topic seems more dire than the last. Just a couple weeks ago, a team of experts found, in BBC's phrasing , that "CO2 from burning fossil fuels is changing the chemistry of the seas faster than at any time since a cataclysmic natural event known as the Great Dying 250 million years ago." Awesome. But what if ocean acidification could also offer a new way to compel the US government to get serious about regulating carbon emissions? That's the idea that a former EPA scientist and lawyers at the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity have now seized on. Last month, the center filed a petition to the EPA ...
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