User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Oct 02 2014 06:10 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Spotlight on green news & views: No mining at the Grand Canyon, half world's wildlife lost 2.10.2014 Daily Kos
Fresh snow on Mount Rainier Many environmentally related posts appearing at Daily Kos each week don't attract the attention they deserve. To help get more eyeballs, Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The most recent Saturday Spotlight can be seen here . So far, more than 19,585 environmentally oriented diaries have been rescued for inclusion in this weekly collection since 2006. Inclusion of a diary in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. Energy Bookshelf: Even though we must think about Climate, "Don't Even Think About It" —by A Siegel: "George Marshall's Don't Even Think About It: Why our brains are wired to ignore climate change (first chapter in pdf) should be on the must read list for anyone concerned about communicating climate change (and -- as importantly -- who is open to reconsidering much of their thinking about what works and doesn't work).  In 43 short ...
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Birds and passion, Ecuador rules in biodiversity. 1.10.2014 Earth Times
The evolutionary relationships between organisms are endless, while some stand out as truly incredible. For 10 million years, mountains have moved and bills have been “paid” as pollination was accomplished by bat, bee and bird
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Human Activities Have Cut Animal Populations In Half Since 1970 1.10.2014 Think Progres

Habitat degradation, exploitation, and climate change have cut global vertebrate populations by 52 percent in the last four decades, according to a new study.

The post Human Activities Have Cut Animal Populations In Half Since 1970 appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Despite Its Remoteness, Antarctica's Health Matters 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've had the privilege of doing research in places that are seldom seen by humans: remote, nearly pristine reefs in the Phoenix Islands ; seamounts near Cocos Island ; and the waters of Indonesia and Palau. But Antarctica was the locale that took my breath away. It is the biggest, wildest, strangest and most remote place on Earth. There the air is so clear and its beauty so stunning, you wonder if you have just learned to see. Today, the Ocean Health Index released its first assessment of the health of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean . The results show that distance, fierce winds, bitter cold, the raging seas and plenty of ice have managed to diminish the human impact on the inaccessible Southern Ocean. But despite its geographic isolation, it has not been enough. Antarctica's Delicate Balance Over the past century, whalers and sealers nearly extirpated blue whales from the region, and so heavily damaged other species that the International Whaling Commission (IWC) declared a moratorium on commercial ...
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WWF: Half the world's wildlife gone over last 40 years 30.9.2014 Chicago Tribune: Nation
The world populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles fell overall by 52 percent between 1970 and 2010, far faster than previously thought, the World Wildlife Fund said on ...
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8 Things You Wanted to Know About Madagascar but Were Afraid to Ask 27.9.2014 Global Voices
If you ever wonder about visiting Madagascar or simply want to know more about the island, here are a few facts to consider.
Obama Just Created The Biggest Marine Safe Haven In The World 25.9.2014 Think Progres

The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument will be expanded to six times its current size, protecting critical ecosystems southwest of Hawaii.

The post Obama Just Created The Biggest Marine Safe Haven In The World appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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How Global Shipping Could Change Our Understanding of Biodiversity 24.9.2014 Wired Top Stories
A new study argues that the theory biologists use to predict an ecosystem's biodiversity should be modified to account for the global ...
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Open thread for night owls: Three activists discuss climate change actions 24.9.2014 NewsTrust Yahoo Pipes Feed
Child Laborer, Newberry, South Carolina, photographed in 1908 by Lewis H. Hine, a sociologist who used the camera to document conditions in which young American children worked in the early 1900s. At Democracy Now on Tuesday, Amy Goodman and Aaron Maté explored the views of three people active in the climate change movement: AMY GOODMAN: We’re joined right now by three guests. Vandana Shiva is the executive director of the Navdanya Trust in India, which promotes biodiversity conservation, organic farming, the rights of farmers, and the process of seed saving, author of many books, including Making Peace with the Earth and Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis. Desmond D’Sa is with us. He’s coordinator of the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance in South Africa, the recipient of the 2014 Goldman Environmental Prize. And Winona LaDuke is also here, Native American activist and executive director of the group Honor the Earth. She lives and works on the White Earth ...
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Federal judge reinstates protections for Wyoming wolves 24.9.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature 22.9.2014 Wired Top Stories
The Western Ghats in India rise like a wall between the Arabian Sea and the heart of the subcontinent to the east. The 1,000-mile-long chain of coastal mountains is dense with lush rainforest and grasslands, and each year, clouds bearing monsoon rains blow in from the southwest and break against the mountains’ flanks, unloading water ...
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Brown administration's angling to ban lead fishing weights 22.9.2014 LA Times: Top News
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'Assisted migration' may save some species from climate change doom 22.9.2014 LA Times: Commentary
Most people have never seen a pika. The small mammals with oversized, round ears and stubby legs live at high elevation, on rocky slopes in the mountains of western North America and Asia. But there's a reason we need to be talking about them, and the discussion has to include two of the most...
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Mexico: Researcher Raises Alert About Environmental Risks in Region With Highest Concentration of Wind Farms in Latin America 17.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles

2014 917 wind 6bThe wind turbines of the Biioxo Wind Farm are located on land that used to be cultivated. (Photo: Santiago Navarro F.)

Southern Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec is the site of the largest concentration of wind farm projects in Latin America. In this interview, biologist Patricia Mora explains what environmental impact studies leave out: the real impacts on regional flora and fauna, and how those negative effects extend beyond Mexico to ecosystems in Central America.

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Presenting the 2014 Rising Voices Amazonia Grantees 16.9.2014 Global Voices
Rising Voices welcomes seven new grantees from the latest microgrant competition for citizen media outreach projects in Amazonian communities.
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Four Ways Industrial Ag Is Destroying the Soil - and Your Health 14.9.2014 Truthout.com
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Indigenous Peoples Seek Presence in Post-2015 Development Agenda 13.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Large number of salmon return to Columbia River 13.9.2014 AP Washington
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- Hundreds of thousands of salmon are making their way from the ocean up the Columbia River this month, a windfall for salmon eaters, and for tribal and recreational fishermen in the Pacific Northwest....
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Foodies, Feds and Factory Farms: Why We Need Vegans Now More Than Ever 12.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Louisiana's St. Tammany Parish Comes One Step Closer to Fracking 10.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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