User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Aug 18 2014 23:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Emerging solar plants scorch birds in mid-air 18.8.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays — "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair.
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Emerging California solar plants scorch birds in mid-air 18.8.2014 San Jose Mercury News: California
Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays -- 'streamers,' for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair
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Emerging solar plants scorch birds in mid-air 18.8.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
IVANPAH DRY LAKE, Calif. (AP) — Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays — "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair Federal wildlife investigators who visited the BrightSource Energy plant last year
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Emerging solar plants scorch birds in mid-air 18.8.2014 AP National
IVANPAH DRY LAKE, Calif. (AP) -- Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays - "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair...
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Proposed bird habitat could hurt Arizona mine 16.8.2014 Durango Herald
TUCSON, Ariz. – Conservationists say a new proposal for protected habitat for the yellow-billed cuckoo in southern Arizona could impede plans for a mine in that area. Already, the proposed Rosemont copper mine south of Tucson has faced seven years of delays. The mine was dealt another setback in May, when the U.S. Fish and...
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Meet LA's wildest night stalker - it wants fresh blood 14.8.2014 New Scientist: Living World
This ferocious feline isn't stalking the savannah, as you might expect: it's prowling Malibu Creek State Park, a stone's throw from Los ...
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On a Boat, Saving a Shark, Surrounded By Government Boats That Want It Dead 13.8.2014 Esquire
The Australian government has spent $20 million trying to kill almost every shark that will take its bait. It's wildly unpopular. Between 80 and 90 percent of Australians hate the law. Blair Ranford and Laura Boute are trying to stop it themselves.
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U.S. Denies Wolverine Protection From Climate Change Because ‘We Just Don’t Know’ 13.8.2014 Think Progres

While wolverines may currently be caught up in a partisan bureaucratic hubbub, the real long-term threat is that from human activities -- especially those that cause greenhouse gas emissions.

The post U.S. Denies Wolverine Protection From Climate Change Because ‘We Just Don’t Know’ appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Fish and Wildlife drops proposal to list wolverine as threatened 13.8.2014 LA Times: Environment
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday withdrew its proposal to list the wolverine as a threatened species in the contiguous United States. The agency said its earlier research, which concluded that climate change was destroying the snow-loving mammal's alpine habitat, had been...
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Biology student in Colombia faces jail for reposting scholarly article 12.8.2014 Boing Boing


Columbia's draconian copyright law (passed after US pressure) provides for prison sentences for simple copyright infringement; Diego Gomez, a biodiversity conservation Master's candidate at University of Quindío shared a paper related to his fieldwork, and the paper's author has brought a prosecution against him. Read the rest

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Carbon credits, afforestation and wildlife diversity, at last 11.8.2014 ypipesc
While politics plays a part, people’s hearts and minds are a much more important local cog in the process of building conservation, industrial, afforestation, eco-tourism and educational change into the environmental perspective.
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Several pairs of owls at center of forest debate 11.8.2014 Durango Herald
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. – Environmentalists are concerned that thinning a forest south of Flagstaff would harm three breeding pairs of Mexican spotted owls that live there.Mormon Mountain was the mountain that officials wanted to thin when Flagstaff voters approved a $10 million project in 2012 aimed at keeping water supplies safe. The...
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Grizzlies? In California? Why not? 11.8.2014 LA Times: Commentary
Not long ago, the grizzly bear graced more than the state's flag in California. In the 1800s, grizzlies could still be spotted swimming to Angel Island, and the man who became known as Grizzly Adams reportedly took his pet grizzly for regular walks in downtown San Francisco.
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Human exodus may have reached China 100,000 years ago 8.8.2014 New Scientist: Health
The standard story is that modern humans left Africa 60,000 years ago, but fossils and genetics hint that an earlier migration made it to ...
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Let's Search for Aliens by Looking for Their Pollution 6.8.2014 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on Slate and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Humans are affecting the Earth's systems on a global scale. Industrial pollutants are accumulating in our atmosphere with the potential for long-term impact on global climate and biodiversity. This is a story we are all coming to know well. However, there is now a new twist to the unanticipated consequences of anthropogenic climate change. In the distant future, industrial pollution—a sure sign of our technological activity—could potentially be detected from hundreds of light years away. Might extraterrestrial civilizations one day discover us by our pollution? Conversely, if aliens are anything like us, might we detect the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations by their pollution? The search for extraterrestrial intelligence, more popularly known as SETI, has traditionally focused on looking for signs of technological activity by scanning the skies for electromagnetic radiation, such as radio ...
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Wildlife refuges phasing out GMO crops, pesticides 6.8.2014 AP Business
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) -- National wildlife refuges around the country are phasing out genetically modified crops and a class of pesticides related to nicotine in programs meant to provide food for wildlife....
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'Green News Report' - August 5, 2014 6.8.2014 BradBlog
  IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: Drinking water ban in Ohio's 4th largest city is over -- for now; Mine waste breach means British Columbia's water crisis is just beginning; California state of emergency over wildfires; Bee-killing pesticide now found in U.S. rivers; PLUS: Trees save lives ... All that and more ...
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Dear New York, Don't Freak Out About Ebola. You're Going to Be Fine. 5.8.2014 Mother Jones
A man who was recently in West Africa is being tested for the deadly Ebola virus at Mount Sinai hospital in Manhattan, hospital officials confirmed on Monday, after he arrived overnight with symptoms that may be consistent with the virus. "All necessary steps are being taken to ensure the safety of all patients, visitors and staff," Mount Sinai officials said in a statement . But that didn't stop the inevitable rush of panic on Twitter from New Yorkers and others around the country worried about a potential spread of the disease, which has  claimed 887 lives , mainly in West Africa. But, unlike African countries already suffering the misery of the biggest outbreak ever recorded, the American public has little to fear, says Dr. Jonathan Epstein, an Ebola expert and a veterinary epidemiologist with EcoHealth Alliance, an international organization of scientists that studies biodiversity and conservation. Here is an edited transcript of our conversation about how New Yorkers, and the rest of the country, ...
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Indigenous Seed Savers Gather in the Andes, Agree to Fight Climate Change With Biodiversity 4.8.2014 Truthout.com
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Researchers to conduct first survey of Minnesota's native bees 4.8.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
For years, scientists have studied honeybees to assess the connection between their declining population and the use of pesticides, declining habitat and disease. But until recently, they paid little attention to Minnesota's native bees.
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