User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Dec 07 2016 13:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Spread by trade and climate, bugs butcher America's forests 7.12.2016 AP Top News
PETERSHAM, Mass. (AP) -- In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it's easy to miss one of the tree's nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree....
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Top Scientists: Amazon's Tapajós Dam Complex "a Crisis in the Making" 4.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Tapajós River, Brazil. More than 40 dams would turn this free-flowing river and its tributaries into a vast industrial waterway threatening the Tapajós Basin's ecosystems, wildlife, people and even the regional and global climate. (Photo: International Rivers on Flickr, licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) license) Brazil is forging ahead with plans to build a vast hydropower dam complex in the heart of the Amazon that would convert the now remote and wild Tapajós river system into a tamed industrial waterway for the purpose of transporting soybeans -- development that scientists and NGOs say will threaten Amazonian biodiversity , ecosystems, traditional livelihoods, indigenous cultures, and the global climate. A total of 42 large dams are planned or under construction in the Tapajós Basin, a biologically and culturally rich region, and one of eight areas of Amazonian biological endemism . Fed by tributaries in the states of Mato Grosso, Rondônia and ...
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Patagonia wants to save the world through beer and buffalo jerky 1.12.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Beer and buffalo jerky may not be the first tools that come to mind for confronting the environmental crisis. But when you consider that agriculture — from the way we manage soil to the cultivation of livestock — is a major source of carbon emissions and a leading cause of biodiversity degradation,...

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Climate Change And The Southeastern Fires 29.11.2016 Crooks Liars
Wildfires are threatening Gatlinburg, Tennessee and other parts of the Southeast. Unfortunately, the Southeast can look forward to more outbreaks of this nature, and climate change is a definite factor that could influence their increase. The U.S. Forest Service did a study of conditions impacting the vulnerability of the Southeast to forest fire in a 2014 published report . Increasing temperatures can not only impact on humidity, they also allow for increased spread of invasive species. In addition, climate change can also lead to fewer prescribed burns, leading to yet more biodiversity degradation. Combined, both water and air quality will suffer. From the study ...
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The endangered Tapaculo adapts to fragmentation of its forest. 28.11.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
When we lose so many animals and plants from South America, often as soon as they are discovered as new species. It is consoling to discover such an animal that seems to be looking after itself, in secondary forest, and with hopes of recovery from population loss. Of course, some smart new conservation effort may be required in the form of forest regeneration and afforestation ----- !
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Protections for Rare and Endangered Animals Under Threat From Drilling Industry 24.11.2016 Truthout.com
While the nation's list of protected species is poised to grow, a handful of those rare and wild animals can only survive in habitat also targeted by Texan drillers. And any changes to environmental standards driven by oil lobbyists could undermine fundamental protections for wildlife nationwide. A well is drilled at an Apache Energy site in the Permian Basin in Midland, Texas, February 14, 2012. (Photo: Jim Wilson / The New York Times) Midland, Texas -- Monarch butterflies, tiny lizards, and a type of grouse known as the lesser prairie chicken all drew close scrutiny from a large gathering of oil and gas executives at the Permian Basin Petroleum Association's annual meeting this year. Fracking has helped turn the Permian Basin into the nation's most productive oil field -- and the only part of the U.S. where the oil industry continues to expand robustly despite a price slump that began in mid-2014. But the parched Permian Basin is also home to a broad array of rare wildlife, including a significant ...
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Scientists go big with first aquatic species map for US West 24.11.2016 AP National
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- It sounds like a big fish story: a plan to create a biodiversity map identifying thousands of aquatic species in every river and stream in the western U.S....
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Enviros sue over Alaska Railroad LNG project 22.11.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Anchorage • An environmental group filed a lawsuit Monday against the Federal Railroad Administration for failing to disclose the approval process for the Alaska Railroad’s application for rail shipments of highly volatile liquefied natural gas. The Alaska Railroad would make the nation’s first rail shipments of LNG. The Center for Biological Diversity filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Washington D.C. on Monday. Miyoko Sakashita, a senior attorney for the organization, said the federal... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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New Orleans Water Protectors Show Solidarity With Standing Rock 20.11.2016 Truthout.com
Protesters line the street in front of the US Army Corp of Engineers headquarters. (Photo: ©2016 Julie Dermansky) On November 15, over 150 people protested against the Dakota Access Pipeline in New Orleans outside the US Army Corp of Engineers headquarters in a show of solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose fight against the pipeline has made international news.  The New Orleans demonstration, one of over 100 planned in the US and 20 in cities worldwide, called on President Obama to deny Energy Transfer Partners, owner of Dakota Access pipeline, permission to complete the project. The Sioux tribe contends that the pipeline will jeopardize their drinking water while the conglomerate behind the controversial Dakota Access oil pipeline insists that the pipeline will operate safely. An analysis by the Center for Biological Diversity of federal data related to ETP shows the corporation's argument is impossible to prove. The conglomerate is responsible for 29 pipeline safety incidents since 2006, ...
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What's the Best Way to Improve Bee Habitat? 20.11.2016 Truthout.com
Each morning last summer, Michael Roswell walked through restored meadows and abandoned New Jersey farm fields, where leggy grasses and weeds grew unchecked and thick patches of bee balm, black-eyed Susans, mountain mints, goldenrod and purple-loosestrife added shots of magenta, yellow, and white. Each time a bee landed, Roswell would swing his sweep net, capturing the insect so he could identify it by species. A doctoral student at Rutgers University, he was trying to answer a seemingly simple question: What kinds of flowers do bees like? The answer may be complicated. A  recent analysis  by researchers at the US Geological Survey detected genetic material from more than 260 different flowering plant groups in the pollen of North Dakota honeybees. And honeybees are just one species: All told, the  US Department of Agriculture estimates  there are  more than 4,000 bee species  in the United States alone. A field bursting with blooms is a bee's delight. Researchers are working to identify how to optimize ...
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Moroccan vault protects seeds from climate change and war 13.11.2016 AP Business
RABAT, Morocco (AP) -- Should a doomsday agricultural crisis hit the world&apos;s driest environments, scientists and farmers will turn to an up-and-coming research center and seed bank in Morocco to restock their harvests....
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India sees Kashmir's storied Wular Lake worth more restored 12.11.2016 AP Top News
WULAR LAKE, India (AP) -- Tucked within Kashmir&apos;s Himalayan foothills sits a freshwater lake that was once among Asia&apos;s largest. Long an inspiration to poets, beloved by kings, Wular Lake has been reduced in places to a fetid and stinking swamp....
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How This 30-Year-Old Farm Used Turmeric and Poppies to Build a $50 Million Business 7.11.2016 Inc
A farm in a verdant region of North Carolina is the centerpiece of Gaia Herbs' $50 million natural supplements business.
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The US government needs to transition to solar-powered future 29.10.2016 The Hill
OPINION | Federal buildings need to take the lead in meeting our energy goals.
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Judge overrules feds' refusal to list as endangered Utah wildflowers that grow on oil shale 28.10.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A federal judge intends to vacate a decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to not list two rare desert wildflowers whose range overlaps with Utah’s rich oil shale deposits in Uintah County. Denver-based U.S. District Judge William Martinez faulted the decision’s reliance on a conservation agreement that he doubts would adequately protect Graham’s and White River beardtongue, issuing a decision Tuesday that could upset a landmark deal to keep the plants off the endangered species list. Th...
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Federal court rules wildflowers in Colorado and Utah must be protected 27.10.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
A federal court in Denver on Tuesday ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must reinstate a 2013 proposal to protect two imperiled wildflowers in Colorado and Utah.
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Groups sue seeking protection for forest-dwelling fisher 20.10.2016 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Four conservation groups have sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for not listing the Pacific fisher, a small, weasel-like predator, as a threatened species....
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Pacific bluefin tuna nears a critical state. 9.10.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Will the Pacific see conservation happening as it had to do in the Atlantic? The case of the tuna species there, in past present and future scenarios, leaves us wondering which attitudes reign in Korea, Japan, the USA and Mexico.
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Spotlight on green news & views: SEC looks into Exxon; California could last for centuries 22.9.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight.  More than 25,525 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  FishOutofWater writes— 375 National Academy Scientists Rebuke Trump, Warn of Severe Outcome of Quitting Paris Climate Deal : “Today 375 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel laureates, warned that the consequences of opting out of the Paris climate agreement, as planned by Donald Trump, would be severe and long-lasting for our planet’s climate and for the credibility of the United States. Distinguished MIT Professor Kerry Emanuel, one of the authors of the letter, is a philosophical conservative who was driven out of the Republican party by climate change ...
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Plan divvies up desert for conservation, energy projects 15.9.2016 AP Business
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Swaths of public land in the California desert will be opened to solar and wind farms under a federal plan released Wednesday that preserves much of the landscape for conservation and recreation....
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