User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Waste Management :: Landfills
Last updated: Feb 23 2017 03:04 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Warmer temps lead Salt Lake City to resume compost pickup 23.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake City has ended its cost-saving suspension of curbside compost collection two weeks ahead of schedule, a response to warming temperatures. The city saved 2,726 gallons of fuel, 84,000 pounds of carbon dioxide and 611 pounds of air pollutants during its five-week suspension, according to a news release. “We will continue to have some late-winter storms, but temperatures are on the rise and we know residents are eager to get outside and start working in their yards,” said Sustainability D...
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We're Trashing the Arctic. Literally. 17.2.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by CityLab and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Humanity’s trash has near-universal dominion in the ocean. It swirls in the waves in immense “ garbage patches ,” drifts downward where it’s eaten by whales and turtles , and lands on the deepest sea floor to make it look like a landfill exploded on the moon. Even the places one might assume are pristine, such as the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, are littered with the detritus of human activity, as proven by the growth of a sixth garbage patch in the freezing Barents Sea . The latest evidence of worldwide junk infiltration comes from an observatory west of the Norwegian archipelago Svalbard , called HAUSGARTEN , where scientists have constructed a multiyear log of marine debris. In this remote location, more and more litter is appearing on the seabed—almost double the amount was found at one monitoring station in 2011 compared to 2002, they write in Deep Sea Research Part 1 . Not only that, but ...
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Aging sewer pipe under Denver’s southern suburbs fraught with fetid, fiery problems 17.2.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
A methane-fueled fireball hurls manhole covers hundreds of feet, like giant circular saw blades slicing the air. A 60-plus year old pipe collapses 50 feet underground, causing millions of gallons of raw sewage to back up until the noxious stew flows into the South Platte River. It's a disaster that hasn't come to pass yet but sanitation officials in the south suburbs say the doomsday scenario is "not beyond the realm of possibility." "This is something that has to be dealt with really quickly," said Patrick Fitzgerald, [cq comment="cqcq"]district manager of the Platte Canyon Water & Sanitation District.
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Not Fake News: Sarah Palin Hinted As Ambassador To Canada 11.2.2017 Crooks Liars
Last year's interview with Jake Tapper, whose restraint is amazing. Sorry, Sarah, the Energy Department destruction job (which he too found out wasn't about oil and coal) went to the other Mensan of the GOP, Rick Perry The Op-Ed at The Ottawa Citizen did not sugarcoat it: ...here she is, as enduring and empty as a tin can in a landfill. Her name – believe it or not – is in the chatter coming out of the Prime Minister’s Office and the State Department. Sarah Palin, yes, that Sarah Palin, is being suggested as Ambassador to Canada. Dear Mr. Trump: Rather than appoint Sarah Palin as ambassador to Canada, please bomb us. Signed, all intelligent life in Canada. #killmenow — Doug Youmans (@dippedbanana) February 8, 2017 If Sarah Palin becomes the ambassador to #Canada . Then every MP she ever speaks with should only speak to her in French. ...
Plastics tech makes composting easier. But will businesses get on board? 10.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Companies are increasingly adopting cutlery and dishes that can be tossed in the compost along with food waste. But for some, it's still untenable financially and practically.
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Wasting food wastes everything 10.2.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Did you know an average family throws 40 percent of its food away, wasting approximately $1,500 every year? What if you could buy only what you need at the grocery store, save money and have less food waste? This year, Yampa Valley Sustainability Council is launching a campaign to raise awareness about food waste and help community members reduce wasted food. There are many reasons to reduce food waste. Not only does food waste target our wallets, but it also harms the environment. According to the EPA, 20 percent of waste that goes to the landfill is food. This rotting food releases methane, a powerful short-term greenhouse gas that is 72 times more potent than carbon dioxide through a 20-year period. YVSC is partnering with the Environmental Protection Agency on a local food waste challenge, “Food Too Good to Waste,” to raise awareness of wasted food and change habits in our community to feed people, not the landfill. As part of the challenge, YVSC is recruiting families to participate in a pilot ...
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Recycling pickup missed in St. Paul? Contractor says they're working on it 9.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Last month, the city switched from curbside bins to wheeled carts that are generally picked up in alleys. That meant redesigning routes. Eureka Recycling says some homes were missed because of incomplete electronic map data.
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Old Ship Saloon lives on thanks to new owners 9.2.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
The owner of the Old Ship Saloon is sailing off into the sunset, but unlike an increasing number of San Francisco legacy bars that have closed in the last several years, the watering hole will live on, thanks to a new, preservation-minded ownership regime. “I guess the easiest way to explain it is that I hit the end of the road,” said Old Ship Saloon owner Bill Duffy. Located off Jackson Square, in what was once the Barbary Coast neighborhood, the Old Ship Saloon is arguably San Francisco’s oldest bar. Once the ship was landlocked by landfill, a building was built on the same site, which is now the corner of Pacific and Battery. Roughly a century and a half later, the Old Ship Saloon is one of the last remaining watering holes in an area that was once filled with them. “I’ve been here since 1988, and all around the neighborhood, I’ve watched drinking and eating establishments disintegrate and die and be turned into some other use or go to high-end dining that’s inaccessible for most people,” Duffy ...
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Chicago's bag tax takes effect today. Here's what you need to know. 1.2.2017 Chicago Tribune: Business
Starting Wednesday, Chicago will be nudging shoppers to BYOB — bring your own bag, that is. A checkout tax of 7 cents per bag will be added at all Chicago retailers, the city's latest attempt to cut down on the use of disposable bags, typically provided for free at checkout, which often end ...
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Company: Size of Iowa diesel pipeline spill overestimated 31.1.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Magellan Midstream Partners officials initially estimated that nearly 139,000 gallons spilled when the pipeline broke near Hanlontown, but the company said Monday that it has reported a new estimate of nearly 47,000 gallons to federal authorities.
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Federal judge again blocks Texas rules requiring burial or cremation of fetal remains 28.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

A federal judge Friday blocked Texas from requiring that fetal remains to be buried or cremated.

U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks said the new rule placed burdens on access to abortion that "substantially outweigh the benefits."

In issuing a preliminary injunction that indefinitely prohibits Texas...

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Workers clean one-fifth of Iowa pipeline spill 27.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Des Moines, Iowa • Workers have removed about one-fifth of the 140,000 gallons of diesel that spilled from a broken pipeline onto an Iowa farm, authorities said on Thursday, and all the liquid on the ground should be cleaned up by the end of the day. Vacuum trucks were sucking up the fuel that spilled onto an acre of grass and tilled farmland when the pipeline broke. About 18 percent of the liquid had been removed, and no fuel entered rivers or streams, said Iowa Department of Natural Resources ...
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With plenty of bad blood between them, Wizards-Celtics rivalry is in full bloom 24.1.2017 Washington Post
With plenty of bad blood between them, Wizards-Celtics rivalry is in full bloom
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YVSC launches campaign to reduce household food waste 24.1.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Yampa Valley Sustainability Council is working to reduce the amount of food local families throw away to help save money and conserve natural resources. The organization will kick off this food waste reduction campaign at its monthly Talking Green education event “Food too Good to Waste,” from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at Creekside Café, 131 11th St. in downtown Steamboat Springs, according to a news release from the organization. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports an average family throws away 40 percent of its food, wasting approximately $1,500 every year. Reducing food waste not only lowers a family’s grocery bill, but is also an important climate protection strategy. Wasted food squanders the water and energy that went into production and transportation. Rotting food in the landfill releases methane, a harmful greenhouse gas 72 times more potent than carbon dioxide measured through a 20-year period. Virginia Till, food management and recycling specialist at the EPA office in ...
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Environmentalists: Coal ash landfill near Price must be moved 24.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Three environmental groups have joined forces to call for Rocky Mountain Power to relocate a landfill which released more than 2,000 cubic yards of coal ash into the Price River last summer. The Sierra Club, HEAL Utah, and Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment believe the landfill must be moved farther from the river to prevent future spills and protect communities downstream. “Coal ash has some troubling components to it,” said Matt Pacenza, executive director of HEAL Utah, “and we think pi... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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It's a bird! It's a plane! Therein lies the problem at Lebanon's international airport 23.1.2017 L.A. Times - World News

The bird hunters stepped nonchalantly over plastic bottles, wrappers and other detritus, unconcerned by the noise they made as they patrolled this shabby-looking section of Lebanon's coastline.

But, save for the occasional passenger jet lumbering out of Beirut’s international airport a mere 500...

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'Gullstravaganza" on tap this Saturday 17.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Great Salt Lake Audubon is sponsoring its seventh annual Utah Birders “Gullstravaganza” Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. The cost is a $5 donation to the organization. Every winter, California Gulls congregate on the edges of the Great Salt Lake to search for food at nearby landfills, parks, wildlife management areas and anywhere with open water. Other gills that stray from their normal winter ranges often join these birds. According to Great Salt Lake Audubon, this creates a mix of thousands o...
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Chargers' move a risky proposition for more than just the team 13.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Gambling isn’t allowed in the NFL, but this Chargers relocation feels like one big roll of the dice.

There’s extreme anger in San Diego, where betrayed fans are discarding their Chargers jerseys in front of team headquarters. And there’s apathy in Los Angeles, where the arrival of a second team...

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Deer carcasses, heads dumped near public trail 8.1.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Several dozen deer carcasses seized by law enforcement were piled up on public land near a Rochester community college and a public wildlife trail, prompting complaints from the public.
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Kitty litter helps Wyoming bentonite get past drilling slump 4.1.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
The market for a peculiar type of clay is looking up thanks to improved prospects for oil and gas drilling and to cat owners who use the stuff to soak up their pets’ business. [...] two of the biggest uses are in kitty litter and drilling mud, the goop pumped down oil and gas wells during drilling to keep the bit cool and carry cuttings to the surface. Over the past two years, bentonite mining companies that do a lot of business with the oil-field services industry suffered while the oil and gas industry experienced its worst slump in 20 years or more. [...] oil and gas prices have recovered somewhat, and petroleum companies look to drill more soon. Cat litter has helped the industry ride out the oil and gas downturn, said Wyoming Mining Association Executive Director Travis Deti. Drilling mud accounts for the largest portion of Wyo-Ben’s business, while kitty litter and environmental lining round out the company’s top three markets, Magstadt said. Bentonite kitty litter isn’t terribly kind to the ...
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