User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Waste Management :: Incinerators
Last updated: Aug 23 2016 01:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Judge hears arguments over general's role in Bergdahl case 23.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Fort Bragg, N.C. • A military judge expressed skepticism Monday that letters destroyed by a top general are relevant to the prosecution of Bowe Bergdahl on charges related to his leaving his post in Afghanistan. The judge, Army Col. Jeffery Nance, is likely to decide later in the afternoon whether the general who leads U.S. Forces Command will testify this week during pretrial hearings this week at Fort Bragg. Bergdahl’s attorneys argue that Gen. Robert B. Abrams faced improper conflicts when he...
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China city suspends search for nuclear fuel facility 10.8.2016 AP Business
BEIJING (AP) -- A city in eastern China city has suspended preliminary work on selecting a site for a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility following days of protests by area residents....
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The Brutally Secretive Life of the Racing Tire 9.7.2016 Wired Top Stories
The Brutally Secretive Life of the Racing Tire
In the world of motorsports, even things as seemingly simple as tires are worth serious protection. The post The Brutally Secretive Life of the Racing Tire appeared first on WIRED.
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Police injured as residents protest incinerator in China 3.7.2016 Washington Post: World
A protest on Sunday against an incinerator in a southern Chinese town turned violent as some people attempted to break into government offices and police were injured, residents and authorities said.
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California to fire up burners to battle dead tree epidemic 19.6.2016 AP National
CRESSMAN, Calif. (AP) -- California's drought and a bark beetle epidemic have caused the largest die-off of Sierra Nevada forests in modern history, raising fears that trees could come crashing down on people or fuel deadly wildfires that could wipe out mountain communities....
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Live in a Tree Stump! 6.5.2016 Boing Boing
Money is tight for the great majority of people right now. If renting an apartment is not for you, and you want a small house for less than $40k, then chances are it’s going to be a so-called “ tiny house .” These are typically 50 to 400 square feet and most often use a compost or chemical toilet (or, god forbid the smell, an incinerator toilet). Here (right) is a photo of a typical tiny house from Wikipedia. People think this is a new thing. While the reason people may be building and living in houses the size of a single room in a home may vary (“I want to downsize,” “I can make do with less,” “Who can afford a regular size house?” “My wife and kids drive me nuts!”), the fact is that people have been living in eensy-weensy domiciles for hundreds of years. I suppose we could start with the cave, and the caveman and woman, but that’s silly. They didn’t even know about toilet paper. In the 1800s, as the migration toward the western part of the U.S. began in earnest: As the first waves of loggers swept ...
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Contamination at Largest US Air Force Base in Asia: Kadena, Okinawa 6.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Documents obtained under the US Freedom of Information Act reveal how years of accidents and neglect at the Kadena Air Base in Okinawa have been polluting local land and water with hazardous chemicals including arsenic, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos and dioxin. Located in the center of Okinawa Island, Kadena Air Base is the largest United States Air Force installation in Asia. Equipped with two 3.7 kilometer runways and thousands of hangars, homes and workshops, the base and its adjoining arsenal at Chibana sprawl across 46 square kilometers of Okinawa's main island. Approximately 20,000 American service members, contractors and their families live or work here alongside 3,000 Japanese employees. More than 16,000 Okinawans own the land upon which the installation sits. Kadena Air Base hosts the biggest combat wing in the USAF -- the 18th Wing -- and, during the past seven decades, the installation has served as an important launch pad for wars in Korea, Vietnam and Iraq. Given the long ...
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2nd Chinese city in a week halts trash incinerator plans 28.4.2016 Washington Post: World
For the second time in a week, a Chinese city has announced it would halt plans for a garbage incinerator project following angry protests by residents.
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China trash incinerator project called off after protests 23.4.2016 Washington Post: World
Authorities in eastern China have halted plans to build a trash incinerator after rowdy street protests by residents and the arrests of four people.
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China trash incinerator project called off after protest 22.4.2016 Washington Post: World
Authorities in eastern China say they have halted plans to build a trash incinerator after rowdy street protests by residents and arrests of two women.
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How a Baltimore Student Kept the Nation's Largest Incinerator Out of Her Neighborhood 20.4.2016 American Prospect
Goldman Environmental Prize Four years ago, Baltimore high school senior Destiny Watford was alarmed to learn that a waste-to-energy incinerator would soon be built in her neighborhood. The Fairfield incinerator, which was planned for a 90-acre site less than a mile from the Benjamin Franklin High School that the 17-year-old attended, was set to emit 240 pounds of mercury and 1,000 pounds of lead into the air every year. Growing up in Baltimore’s heavily industrialized Curtis Bay neighborhood, Watford had seen the dangers that pollution posed for her community. “I know a lot of people with asthma and lung disease,” Watford told The American Prospect. “The deaths related to air pollution in Baltimore City are higher than the homicide rate.”  Watford swung into action. She cofounded Free Your Voice, a student group that began gathering testimonies and signatures from local residents who did not want to see another industrial project in their neighborhood. First, the students convinced the city’s public ...
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Open thread for night owls. Destiny Watford and what she did to merit a Goldman Environment Prize 20.4.2016 Daily Kos
I took note of the six recipients of the 2016 Goldman Environmental Prize on Monday. Aura Bogado at Grist has interviewed Destiny Watford, the only American who received one of the prizes this year, which are divvied up with geographical and other diversities in mind. Here’s the introduction to that interview: Destiny Watford was a 17-year-old student at a south Baltimore high school when she asked a roomful of students if they suffered from asthma. To her dismay, every single hand went up. That was three years ago, when Watford was in the middle of a fight to stop Energy Answers International from building a solid-waste incinerator in the Baltimore neighborhood of Curtis Bay. Her mother, along with many friends and family members, had asthma, and her neighbor died from lung cancer. The culprits seemed obvious to Watford: the medical-waste incinerator, coal pier, and slew of chemical plants surrounding Curtis Bay that foul the air. A proposed solid-waste incinerator, the biggest of its kind in the United ...
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Tooele residents concerned about pending Stericycle move, possibility of more pollution 20.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Gina Cooley moved to Erda in 2014 after her pediatrician advised her that pollution from a medical-waste incinerator in North Salt Lake could be the source of her then-4-year-old son’s near-daily headaches. That same year, Stericycle also decided to move to Tooele County. Cooley heard about the relocation only after the decision was final, she said. And before Monday’s public hearing on the proposed facility’s air-quality permit, she was under the impression the facility would be farther away fr...
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Sanders and Clinton Back Bioenergy, but Activists Say It's the Wrong Alternative 7.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
For more original Truthout election coverage, check out our election section, "Beyond the Sound Bites: Election 2016." The number one form of "renewable" energy in the United States is bioenergy, an energy source derived from burning trees, crops, manure, trash or waste for electricity and/or heat, or converting transportation fuels. According to the Energy Information Administration, 49.6 percent of renewable energy in the US in 2014 came from bioenergy; 18 percent, from wind; and 4.4 percent, from solar photovoltaics. With 82 percent of US energy generated from fossil fuels , barring a reduction in energy consumption, policies facilitating the transition away from oil, gas and coal will likely continue to rely, in large part, on bioenergy.  Bioenergy poses risks because of its carbon emissions, contributions to air pollution and freshwater demand. Bioenergy's main selling point is that, unlike foreign oil, it's a locally sourced feedstock, which means more money stays in local economies. Industry and ...
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Editorial: State needs to keep a sharp eye on Stericycle 1.4.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
First, Stericycle cut a $2.3 million fine in half by promising the state that it would move out of its North Salt Lake neighborhood and take its tons of nitrous oxides, volatile organic compounds and small particle pollutants with them. Then the operator of one of the nation’s few remaining medical waste incinerators tentatively won the state’s permission to emit even more poisons at its new Tooele County facility as long as it promised to continuously monitor some of the more dangerous emissio...
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In Taiwan, leftover food scraps help farmers sustain porky appetites 24.3.2016 Guardian: Environment
Taiwan has institutionalized the practice of feeding leftover food to livestock, an approach that many nations are using or considering to reduce their food waste. Now, two thirds of the country’s overall food waste helps feed its 5.5m pigs Every night, classical music blares from garbage trucks in Taipei, summoning people from their homes. In their hands, they clutch bags or buckets of kitchen scraps, which they dump into a bin on the truck. From there, the food travels to farms, where it helps ensure a good supply of one of Taiwan’s food staples. Farmers have fed leftover food to livestock for centuries, but Taiwan is one of a handful of countries that have institutionalized the practice. About two thirds of the island nation’s overall food waste, which totaled 610,000 tons last year, goes to help feed the country’s 5.5m pigs – the top meat source for the country’s 23.5 million ...
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Inside the Fight to Frack Pennsylvania Township 4.3.2016 Truthout.com
Penn Township hosts a mix of cookie-cutter single family homes in subdivisions and sprawling farms - some of which have been in families for generations. You can get away from city lights out here. Find a nice home and good school districts among picturesque rural scenery. But not for long. Gene Meyers points toward one of Apex Energy's proposed well sites from a hill by his home near Dutch Hollow Road in Penn Township. (Photo by Connor Mulvaney / PublicSource) Editor's note: This is the first story in our Clearing the Air series about shale gas drilling in Penn Township. PublicSource has followed the events there since April 2015. We placed air quality sensors at five homes to monitor pollutants near the contested well pad for two months. The data collected are being analyzed. PublicSource will share the results with residents and report on what we found. Sign up for our newsletter to ensure you receive our next story. Gene Meyers asked everyone to join him in prayer a few minutes before the Feb. 11 ...
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A Proposed Maryland Law Wants To Make Big Chicken Producers Responsible For Dealing With Their Poop 3.2.2016 Think Progres

The Poultry Litter Management Act would require poultry producers in Maryland to be solely responsible for the chicken manure that their contract farmers produce.

The post A Proposed Maryland Law Wants To Make Big Chicken Producers Responsible For Dealing With Their Poop appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Business News Roundup, Dec. 3 3.12.2015 SFGate: Business & Technology
About 30 food companies announced plans Wednesdday to add scannable codes to their packaging that will offer details about ingredients, allergens and nutrition. The Grocery Manufacturers Association said the new code, called Smart Label, would appear on almost 30,000 products like shampoos, detergents, crackers and sodas by the end of 2017. The trade group publicized the program in the face of fierce lobbying over the issue of labeling foods containing genetically engineered ingredients. Worried about a Vermont law due to go into effect next summer that requires labeling of such foods, the food industry is working to get Congress to put language in an omnibus spending bill that would preempt states from passing such regulations. General Electric Co. has agreed to pay a $2.25 million penalty for releasing unsafe levels of air pollution from a hazardous waste incinerator in upstate New York and submitting false pollution control records. The U.S. Justice Department announced the settlement Wednesday ...
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In Maryland, Burning Chicken Manure Counts As Renewable Energy 18.11.2015 Think Progres

Environmental activists want Maryland to stop calling chicken manure "renewable energy."

The post In Maryland, Burning Chicken Manure Counts As Renewable Energy appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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