User: newstrust Topic: women
Category: Education
2 new since Apr 23 2017 14:07 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Plight of Palestinian refugees now spans 5 generations 23.4.2017 Washington Post: World
As a boy, Palestinian Abdullah Abu Massoud fled the war over the birth of Israel in 1948 and sought refuge in the nearby Gaza Strip.
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Plight of Palestinian refugees now spans 5 generations 23.4.2017 AP Top News
JERASH CAMP, Jordan (AP) -- As a boy, Palestinian Abdullah Abu Massoud fled the war over the birth of Israel in 1948 and sought refuge in the nearby Gaza Strip....
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America's manliest industries are all competing for women 21.4.2017 Washington Post
America's manliest industries are all competing for women
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Trump’s anti-LGBT Army secretary nominee thinks veterans like me have ‘a disease’ 21.4.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
He’s the wrong choice for the military I love.
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The average millennial worker makes less than the average baby boomer did in 1975 21.4.2017 Washington Post
The average millennial worker makes less than the average baby boomer did in 1975
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Milton A. Gordon dies at 81; former Cal State Fullerton president oversaw an era of increased diversity and growth 20.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Milton A. Gordon dies at 81; former Cal State Fullerton president oversaw era of increased diversity and growth 20.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Milton A. Gordon, the former Cal State Fullerton president who fought for equitable access to higher education and transformed the campus into one of the state’s most prominent and diverse, has died after a long illness at the age of 81.

When Gordon took the helm in 1990, he was the fourth African...

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How the Right-Wing Koch and DeVos Families Are Funding Hate Speech on College Campuses Across the US 19.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos speaks at CPAC 2017 in Oxon Hill, Maryland, February 23, 2017. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) On March 2, eugenicist Charles Murray attempted to give a lecture at Middlebury College in Vermont, with little success. Protesters  shouted him down  and he was sequestered in another room to answer questions over a livestream. Afterwards, Murray left the campus, but not before protesters blocked his car and injured a professor. Labeled a  white nationalist  by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Murray is the author of the 1994 book The Bell Curve, in which he argues that inequalities of race, gender and income exist because white men are smarter and genetically superior to black people, Latinos, women and the poor. Numerous academics have panned the book for its faulty reasoning and unprovable points. So why is someone with such fringe ideas invited to speak on college campuses, and who pays for it? It's unlikely that many university departments would invite such an obviously racist ...
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Listen: Why higher education doesn't close the gender wage gap 19.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Elise Gould and Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe discuss the history and economics of the gender wage gap in the United States.
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Actress Jessica Chastain: Planned Parenthood Attacks Are ‘War on Women’ 18.4.2017 NewsBusters
The “war on women’s healthcare” is the “war” on Planned Parenthood, according to one Oscar-nominated actress. Never mind the health of unborn women destroyed in the womb. Nor the women abused by ISIS. Nor even the American girls reportedly tortured by genital ...
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100 phones found in accused festival thief's backpack 18.4.2017 Boing Boing
What a haul: 100 handsets in a single backpack , found after festival-goers at Coachella trained the "Find My iPhone" app on their missing gadgets. Reinaldo De Jesus Henao, 36, was busted after several concert-goers activated the “Find My Phone” feature on their lost smartphones and noticed that the signals led them directly to him. The ordeal was several days in the making and, according to the Indio Police Department, it took an equal effort by authorities and music fans to catch the prolific smartphone bandit. “I noticed some chatter on social media about phones disappearing on Reddit,” said Indio Police Sergeant Dan Marshall in an interview with Gizmodo. “One of the common threads [among Reddit posters] was that they were all losing their phones at the Sahara tent.” There's something funny about a crowd of marks so distracted and unware of their surroundings that a thief could work a hundred people before being caught by a computer ...
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"Storm the Heavens": Notes From the Weather Underground on Resistance to Trump 17.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Weather Underground Organization founding members Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn speak in San Francisco, California, February 20, 2009. (Photo: Steve Rhodes ) Decades after the Weather Underground disbanded, its members are still fighting for justice, and they have some words of wisdom for those of us engaged in today's political struggles. Former members of the radical resistance group share their perspectives on resisting empire under the Trump regime. Weather Underground Organization founding members Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn speak in San Francisco, California, February 20, 2009. (Photo: Steve Rhodes ) Those of us living within the borders of the United States currently find ourselves living inside the churning engine of a hyper-militarized corporate-fascist farce of a democracy that is spiraling into darkness. The blades of this death-machine are grinding what is left of our precious planet into dust. Now, think back nearly five decades ago to the late 1960s. The Vietnam War was escalating ...
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News roundup: After bashing Bush, Trump leans on his former aides for help 17.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
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DeVos Pick to Head Civil Rights Office Once Said She Faced Discrimination for Being White 16.4.2017 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on ProPublica . As an undergraduate studying calculus at Stanford University in the mid-1990s, Candice Jackson "gravitated" toward a section of the class that provided students with extra help on challenging problems, she wrote in a student publication. Then she learned that the section was reserved for minority students. "I am especially disappointed that the University encourages these and other discriminatory programs," she wrote in the Stanford Review. "We need to allow each person to define his or her own achievements instead of assuming competence or incompetence based on race." Although her limited background in civil rights law makes it difficult to infer her positions on specific issues, Jackson's writings during and after college suggest she's likely to steer one of the Education Department's most important—and controversial—branches in a different direction than her predecessors. A longtime anti-Clinton activist and an outspoken conservative-turned-libertarian, ...
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New federal civil rights enforcement hire has previously said she's against affirmative action 16.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Man charged with sexually assaulting woman at Utah community college 15.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Before Timothy Alan Wyatt grabbed a woman from behind and sexually assaulted her in a locker room at Salt Lake Community College in Taylorsville last week, he spent the night in the school’s athletic building, where — among other things — he covered a motion sensor with tape to prevent the lights from working, charging documents state. When the woman entered the women’s locker room at about 7:45 a.m. on April 7, she noticed a shower was running, but the lights did not activate. She started to le... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
What happened to all those unemployable women's studies majors? 13.4.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
What happened to all those unemployable women's studies majors?
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Black and Trans in North Carolina: The Fight for Justice Continues 13.4.2017 Truthout.com
For all the anti-HB2 money that poured into North Carolina, grassroots groups working directly with the most impacted -- trans people of color -- saw none of it, says Ashley Williams, who does prison abolition and gender-justice-based work with the trans community. Mostly ignored, sometimes tokenized by liberals and nonprofits, trans people of color are forging their own path to direct action. Ashley Williams protests HB2 in uptown Charlotte during a Charlotte Hornets basketball game. (Photo: Courtesy of Ashley Williams)  Since election night 2016, the streets of the US have rung with resistance. People all over the country have woken up with the conviction that they must do something to fight inequality in all its forms. But many are wondering what it is they can do. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, experienced organizers, troublemakers and thinkers share their insights on what works, what doesn't, what has changed and what is still the same. Today's interview is the 29th in the ...
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Class 12 textbook: HRD Minister condemns text as sexist, unacceptable; orders action 13.4.2017 Education – The Indian Express
Why more men will soon find themselves doing ‘women’s work’ 13.4.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
[...] the U.S. economy has shifted more to service-sector jobs that are resilient to automation and tend to be more dominated by women — like health care, one of the sectors that is expected to grow most in coming decades. “Therefore, fast-growing male jobs that require lots of education don’t really help men without a college degree who have been in traditionally male jobs,” Kolko writes. Women in the middle of the education spectrum — those with some college or an associate’s degree — are the most likely to work in more female occupations. [...] both women with the least education (those with no more than a high school degree or with no high school degree) and those with the most (those with a bachelor’s degree or with a graduate or professional degree) are less likely to work in female-dominated fields. The jobs that President Trump campaigned on bringing back to the United States — coal miners, steelworkers, farmers — are all traditionally male industries that have shrunk in recent decades. ...
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